ICE

ICE ERO immigration arrests climb nearly 40 percent

 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – In the 100 days since President Donald J. Trump signed Executive Orders (EOs) regarding immigration enforcement priorities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has arrested more than 41,000 individuals who are either known or suspected of being in the country illegally. This reflects an increase of 37.6 percent over the same period in 2016.
 
Between Jan. 22 and April 29, 2017, ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) deportation officers administratively arrested 41,318 individuals on civil immigration charges. Between Jan. 24 and April 30, 2016, ERO arrested 30,028.
 
“These statistics reflect President Trump’s commitment to enforce our immigration laws fairly and across the board. ICE agents and officers have been given clear direction to focus on threats to public safety and national security, which has resulted in a substantial increase in the arrest of convicted criminal aliens. However, when we encounter others who are in the country unlawfully, we will execute our sworn duty and enforce the law. As the data demonstrates, ICE continues to execute our mission professionally and in accordance with the law, and our communities will be much safer for it,” said ICE Acting Director Thomas Homan.
 
Nearly 75 percent of those arrested during this period in 2017 are convicted criminals, with offenses ranging from homicide and assault to sexual abuse and drug-related charges.
 
The arrest of aliens at-large in the community increased by more than 50 percent, from 8,381 last year to 12,766 arrests this year during the same period.
 
The arrest of convicted criminal aliens climbed nearly 20 percent, from 25,786 last year to 30,473 this year.
 
Violent crimes such as homicide, rape, kidnapping and assault accounted for more than 2,700 convictions.
 
...
While these data clearly reflect the fact that convicted criminals are an immigration enforcement priority, Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly has made it clear that ICE will no longer exempt any class of individuals from removal proceedings if they are found to be in the country illegally. This is evident by the rise in non-criminal arrests over the same period, which increased from approximately 4,200 in 2016 to more than 10,800 in 2017.
 
“All of those arrested will receive the due process afforded to them under the law. ICE will take action to remove individuals subject to a final order by a federal immigration judge. We are a nation of laws, and ignoring orders issued by federal judges undermines our constitutional government,” said Homan.
 
Read the entire report here.

Deportation arrests rise in Rockwood, Latinos say

Breaking a trend, ICE office reports 129 arrests in March.

Deportation agents are stepping up arrests in the Rockwood neighborhood, according to a prominent nonprofit leader in the Latino community.

"What we call the Rockwood area — maybe the David Douglas (School District) — it's always been a no man's land," said community organizer Francisco Lopez. "Nobody pays attention to the area, except ICE."

Lopez heads Voz Hispana Cambio Comunitario, which runs citizenship classes and has organized several marches against U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, also known as ICE.

The organization has identified hot spots in Rockwood (Multnomah County) and the Cornelius and Forest Grove areas west of Hillsboro (Washington County.)

Lopez said more undocumented immigrants are being arrested in these areas than in previous years.

Lopez says the group tracks phone calls from immigrants seeking legal help, which usually arrive after a family member has been picked up.

"The East Multnomah County area has been targeted more aggressively," Lopez argued. "We have seen a lot of phone calls saying, 'They arrested my husband,' 'They arrested my son.'"

The latest numbers from ICE, while not showing a prolonged uptick, do confirm that the business of deportation is continuing as usual.

Deportation officers based in Portland arrested 129 people in March — a big jump — before returning to 68 arrests in April, which is more in line with normal arrest figures.

For comparison, ICE's Portland office made 92 arrests in February and 64 in January. In the three months prior to President Donald Trump's inauguration, October through December 2016, ICE's Portland office made between 71 and 79 arrests each month.

The agency has previously stated it doesn't compile arrest data by location, and it's unclear how many of those arrests occurred in Multnomah County. An ICE spokeswoman notes that those numbers are preliminary and should be considered unofficial estimates.

"Deportation officers carry out enforcement actions every day in locations around the country as part of the agency's mission to protect public safety, border security and the integrity of the nation's immigration system," spokeswoman Rose M. Richeson said in a brief statement.

The large bump in March arrests may be due to a high-profile ICE sweep in Oregon and Washington, which netted 84 undocumented immigrants over a three-day period beginning Saturday, March 25.

Of those arrested during the sweep, 60 had been previously arrested and 24 had no criminal background other than their immigration status, ICE said at the time.

"Man, I'm not surprised," said Lopez after being shown the latest tally. "March was a horrible month in the metro area."

For the newest numbers, ICE also did not specify whether any of those arrests occurred at or near courthouses in Multnomah County.

High-profile deportation arrests at justice centers topped newsfeeds earlier this year, at the same time many county and city officials were loudly re-affirming their commitment to sanctuary status.

Echoing previous reports, a spokesman for Multnomah County Sheriff's Office says undocumented immigrants need to feel safe speaking to uniformed police officers, who don't enforce immigration laws but frequently need the help of eyewitnesses to solve other crimes.

But it's also clear undocumented immigrants who are arrested for non-immigration crimes by local law enforcement are likely to end up on ICE's radar.

For instance, the Sheriff's Office sends all booking records to the state police, who then share that information with ICE.

"ICE may well have access to fingerprint information from the Oregon State Police, but that's not under the Sheriff's purview," explained Lt. Chad Gaidos, an MCSO spokesman. "That's not his decision to disseminate that. He has to follow Oregon state law."

David Olen Cross, a lawful immigration advocate, notes that ICE has access to jail records and other tracking numbers used by the FBI and state law enforcement.

"ICE isn't some separate government entity that doesn't have access to what everybody else does," he said.

Approximately 130,000 unauthorized immigrants live in Oregon, according to the nonprofit pollster Pew Research Center.

'Sanctuary city' resolution on the agenda for Tualatin City Council's next meeting

The council heard from several residents last week who urged it to declare Tualatin a sanctuary for undocumented immigrants. The statement would be mostly a symbolic gesture.

Tualatin could become a self-declared "sanctuary city" as soon as Monday, May 22, if its City Council votes to adopt a resolution slated for discussion on the meeting agenda.

The City Council heard from two students and two staff members at Tualatin High School last Monday, May 8, who asked the council to adopt a resolution similar to those passed in Beaverton and Hillsboro earlier this year. Although receptive, with at least three councilors saying explicitly at the meeting that they are in favor of Tualatin becoming a sanctuary city, the council opted then to continue discussion at least to their next meeting.

An agenda for the council's work session, which begins at 5:30 p.m., includes an estimated 45-minute discussion of the resolution, along with other actions the city could take in a similar vein, such as "a series of listening sessions to address the need and concern of the broader community to feel safe and welcome."

The draft resolution itself is on the agenda for the council's business meeting, which starts at 7 p.m.

Draft resolution provides definition of 'sanctuary city'

It defines a "sanctuary city" as "as a city that is committed to providing a safe community for individuals, regardless of race, ethnicity, place or origin, or immigration status, and works to ensure that all members of our community are sage and can call for public safety assistance without being questioned about federal immigration laws and without fear or reprisal based solely on legal status, in accordance with current Oregon law."

Sanctuary city status in Oregon is largely symbolic, as the state has had a law on the books since 1987 prohibiting state and local law enforcement from using their resources to pursue or detain people on the sole basis of their immigration status.

However, the group that appeared at the May 8 meeting said such a declaration by the Tualatin City Council would affirm Tualatin's place as a community where immigrants can feel welcome. Activists have made similar arguments in Tigard, where the city has responded to groups asking for a sanctuary city declaration with a statement of unity read by Mayor John L. Cook at one recent meeting.

The draft resolution specifies that Tualatin's sanctuary city declaration would be made "as a statement of unity for our community."

Councilor Paul Morrison suggested at the May 8 meeting that the council could consider changing the word "sanctuary," to something else, such as "unity." He and five other council members argued against voting on a resolution at that meeting, the agenda for which did not list sanctuary cities as a discussion item.

Councilor Jeff DeHaan disagreed, saying that he saw neither a need to change the term "sanctuary city" nor a compelling reason to wait until a future meeting to hold a vote. He made a motion that the council adopt the resolution proposed by the group from Tualatin High, but the motion did not receive a second.

Resolution would not prevent ICE from making arrests

Some 17.3 percent of Tualatin residents were identified as "Hispanic or Latino" by the 2010 Census. One of Tualatin's neighborhood schools, Bridgeport Elementary School in east Tualatin, is roughly even-split between students who speak English at home and students who speak Spanish at home, and it has a dual language immersion program to encourage bilingualism in its student population.

A school counselor at Tualatin High who spoke at the May 8 council meeting said that some students have stopped regularly attending classes, staying home due to fears that members of their family could be arrested for being in the United States without legal documentation.

President Donald Trump was elected last November on a campaign platform that included taking a tougher line on illegal immigration. Trump has said he wants to deport millions of undocumented immigrants. Since his inauguration in January, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stepped up its activity, reportedly arresting dozens in the Portland area alone.

Mayor Lou Ogden cautioned at the May 8 meeting that even if Tualatin declares itself a sanctuary city, it cannot stop ICE from operating in the city. Furthermore, state law does allow law enforcement agencies to exchange information with federal authorities in order to verify arrested suspects' immigration status.

The Tualatin City Council work session and meeting at which the resolution is expected to be discussed will be held at the Juanita Pohl Center, 8513 S.W. Tualatin Road.

The May 8 meeting was held at the Tualatin Police Department, not the usual venue for council meetings, due to a budget advisory committee meeting there that immediately preceded it.

FILE - Tualatin City Councilor Jeff DeHaan moved unsuccessfully for the council to approve a resolution declaring Tualatin a sanctuary city at its May 8 meeting.

Victory in Texas: Governor Abbott Signs Anti-Sanctuary Bill

On Sunday, May 7, Texas Governor Greg Abbott (R) signed Senate Bill (SB) 4, strong anti-sanctuary legislation to promote public safety and ensure law enforcement is able to fully cooperate with federal immigration officials. (Texas Tribune, May 7, 2017) Texas is the second state to pass a state-wide anti-sanctuary law this year. Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant (R) signed a bill into law outlawing sanctuary cities in March. (US News, Mar. 27, 2017)

Specifically, SB 4 prohibits state and local entities from adopting, enforcing, or endorsing policies that prohibit or materially limit the enforcement of immigration laws. (SB 4) Public university and college campuses are explicitly included in these requirements. (Id.) SB 4, however, does make an exception for local school districts, public health centers, and other community centers. (Id.) SB 4 also authorizes law enforcement to inquire into a person’s immigration status during a lawful investigation to a criminal offense. (Id.)

To ensure officers comply with the law, SB 4 subjects law enforcement officials with criminal, Class A misdemeanor, charges if they do not comply with detainers sent by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. (Id.) Additionally, localities or colleges who defiantly impose sanctuary policies may be subject to pay a fine, between $1,000 and $25,500 per day the policy is in place. (Id.)

Governor Abbott has consistently taken strong positions on immigration enforcement since taking office and made passing state-wide anti-sanctuary legislation a legislative priority for 2017. (FAIR Legislative Update, Jan. 10, 2017; FAIR Legislative Update, Feb. 7, 2017) “As governor, my top priority is public safety, and this bill furthers that objective by keeping dangerous criminals off our streets,” Abbott said. (Reuters, May 8, 2017)

Texas has been on the front lines of the illegal immigration surge that expanded during the Obama Administration. (FAIR Legislative Update, July 5, 2017) Former President Obama’s lax enforcement policies encouraged record numbers of illegal alien minors and families from Central America to cross the southern border into Texas over recent years. (Id.) As a result, Texas taxpayers have fronted billions in costs associated illegal immigration, particularly with regard to law enforcement, education, and public benefits spending. (Id.)

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report April 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) April 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,644 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on April 1st there were 962 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.57 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 962 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on April 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

April 1, 2017

14,644

13,682

962

6.57%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 April 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on April 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

232

24.12%

Multnomah

202

21.00%

Washington

190

19.75%

Clackamas

78

8.11%

Lane

46

4.78%

Jackson

32

3.33%

Yamhill

23

2.39%

Umatilla

21

2.18%

Klamath

16

1.66%

Linn

16

1.66%

Benton

15

1.56%

Polk

15

1.56%

Deschutes

14

1.46%

Malheur

11

1.14%

Lincoln

8

0.83%

Jefferson

5

0.52%

Clatsop

4

0.42%

Coos

4

0.42%

Josephine

4

0.42%

Wasco

4

0.42%

Columbia

3

0.31%

Douglas

3

0.31%

Hood River

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Crook

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 962 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on April 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

193

20.06%

Rape

170

17.67%

Homicide

137

14.24%

Drugs

104

10.81%

Sodomy

94

9.77%

Assault

80

8.32%

Robbery

56

5.82%

Kidnapping

27

2.81%

Burglary

20

2.08%

Theft

18

1.87%

Driving Offense

8

0.83%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.42%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

51

5.30%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from April 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,744

1,551

193

11.07%

Rape

974

804

170

17.45%

Homicide

1,696

1,559

137

8.08%

Drugs

876

772

104

11.87%

Sodomy

1,016

922

94

9.25%

Assault

2,000

1,920

80

4.00%

Robbery

1,536

1,480

56

3.65%

Kidnapping

292

265

27

9.25%

Burglary

1,308

1,288

20

1.53%

Theft

1,101

1,083

18

1.63%

Driving Offense

217

209

8

3.69%

Vehicle Theft

467

463

4

0.86%

Arson

74

74

0

0.00%

Forgery

45

45

0

0.00%

Escape

36

36

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,262

1,211

51

4.04%

Total

14,644

13,682

962

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 April 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 962 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on April 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

773

80.35%

Guatemala

20

2.08%

El Salvador

13

1.35%

Vietnam

13

1.35%

Cuba

12

1.25%

Honduras

12

1.25%

Russia

9

0.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.73%

Ukraine

7

0.73%

Marshall Islands

6

0.62%

Cambodia

4

0.42%

China

4

0.42%

Laos

4

0.42%

Philippines

4

0.42%

Thailand

4

0.42%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

67

6.96%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 962 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,957.10) per day, ($636,699.70) per week, and ($33,199,341.50) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 962 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,419,266.50).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 962 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile April 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201704.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated April 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2016 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state.

David Olen Cross
Cell Phone: 503.991.2089
E-mail: davidolencross@hotmail.com

CA Sheriff Hits Back at "Sanctuary State" Rhetoric by Showing Just Who Would be Protected

Much attention has been given to the antics of crazy California politicians like Kamala Harris, Kevin de Leon, and Nancy Pelosi, who all advocate for sanctuary city/state policies and call anyone opposed to their view racist or "white supremacist" - and can somehow say with a straight face that this policy doesn't put Americans at risk.

But, there are elected officials and law enforcement officers in the state who strongly oppose these policies and, in particular, Senate Bill 54, which would prohibit law enforcement agencies in the state from using "agency or department moneys, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to investigate, interrogate, detain, detect, or arrest persons for immigration enforcement purposes."

Law enforcement associations have made their concerns known, but since SB 54 has passed the Senate, the Ventura County Sheriff's Department is taking their concerns straight to the public, posting a "rap sheet" of some of the actual Ventura County inmates recently detained by ICE. 

As a follow-up to our concerns over Senate Bill 54, we would like to provide more factual information regarding the types of individuals that would be released into our community if immigration authorities are not allowed in our jail as would be mandated by this bill. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has continued to review inmates in the jail who might have possibly been in the country illegally.

The report stated that ICE had detained 50 inmates in the last 30 days, but the county averages 1,373 ICE detainers a year. All but one of the 50 had either a prior arrest history, current felony charges, or prior deportation orders (yet found themselves in jail again). The Sheriff's Department then posted a sample of the charges of those detained by ICE:

  • Inmate 1 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – drunk driving; stealing a vehicle; hit and run; drunk in public; under the influence of a controlled substance; possession of drugs; possession of drug paraphernalia 
  • Inmate 2 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; dissuading a victim from testifying; obstructing the use of a communication devices to prevent summoning assistance; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence (twice); assault with a deadly weapon; child endangerment; illegal entry; previously deported 
  • Inmate 3 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; false imprisonment; resisting arrest; kidnapping; Prior Arrests – sexual battery; burglary; robbery; false information to a peace officer; brandishing a weapon; false imprisonment; kidnapping; stealing a vehicle; illegal entry; previously deported 
  • Inmate 4 Current Arrest – possession of a controlled substance for sale; transportation of a controlled substance (twice); driving on a suspended license; Prior Arrests – battery (twice); drunk in public; vandalism; transportation, sales, or distribution of a dangerous drug; transportation of a controlled substance; drunk driving (twice)
  • Inmate 5 Current Arrest – felony drunk driving; driving without an ignition interlock device; driving on a suspended license; Prior Arrests – lewd acts with a child under 14; driving on a suspended drivers’ license (five times); drunk driving (twice); unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor 
  • Inmate 6 Current Arrest – assault with a deadly weapon; attempted kidnapping; Prior Arrests – possession of drugs (twice); possession of drug paraphernalia (three times); prowling; theft (twice); false information to a peace officer (twice); drunk in public; robbery (three times); felony domestic violence; assault with a deadly weapon (three times); kidnapping (twice) 
  • Inmate 7 Current Arrest – domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony criminal threats (twice); domestic violence (twice); child endangerment; driving without a license; driving with a suspended license; possession of drugs; theft (twice); possession of stolen property; false information to a peace officer; stealing a vehicle; illegal entry
  • Inmate 8 Current Arrest – kidnapping; false imprisonment; lewd acts with a child under 14; Prior Arrests – resisting arrest; under the influence of drugs (twice); kidnapping; lewd acts with a child under 14, drunk in public 
  • Inmate 9 Current Arrest – warrant for resisting arrest, false information to a peace officer, domestic violence, violation of a domestic violence court order; Prior Arrests – brandishing a weapon; felony domestic violence; felony criminal threats; drunk in public (twice); violation of a domestic violence court order (three times); vandalism; domestic violence (twice); resisting arrest (twice); false information to a peace officer 
  • Inmate 10 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence; previously deported
  • Inmate 11 Current Arrest – possession of a short barreled shotgun; Prior Arrests – assault with a deadly weapon, possession of a short barreled shotgun (twice), assault, carrying a concealed firearm, illegal entry 
  • Inmate 12 Current Arrest – under the influence of drugs; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence, burglary, inflicting injury to a child, under the influence of drugs, resisting arrest, unlicensed driver, drunk driving, possession of drug paraphernalia, false information to a peace officer 
  • Inmate 13 Current Arrest – possession of drugs for sale; Prior Arrests – possession of drugs for sale (twice); previously deported 
  • Inmate 14 Current Arrest – under the influence of drugs; Prior Arrest – member of a street gang, assault with a deadly weapon, conspiracy, possession of drugs, drunk driving, trespassing 
  • Inmate 15 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence; child endangerment; false imprisonment; domestic battery; drunk driving; hit and run

Members of gangs, drug dealers, sex offenders, pedophiles, assault with a deadly weapon, repeat drunk drivers, repeat domestic violence, violating court orders - yeah, these are not harmless people just looking for a way to have a better life. Good for you, Sheriff, on giving the people you're sworn to protect the facts.

OFIR launches STOP Oregon Sanctuaries ballot measure drive

Alert date: 
2017-05-01
Alert body: 

Oregonians for Immigration Reform announces the launching of a new initiative: Initiative Petition 22 -- "Stop Oregon Sanctuaries" - to be placed on the November 2018 statewide ballot.  OFIR is now collecting sponsorship signatures.

"Since 1987, Oregon Revised Statute 181A.820 has prevented Oregon's state and local law-enforcement agencies from offering their fullest cooperation to the U.S. authorities who seek to identify and detain illegal aliens," said OFIR president Cynthia Kendoll.  She stated further:

"The law has effectively rendered ours a 'sanctuary state' for those in the country illegally.  ORS 181A.820 undermines the rule of law generally and federal immigration law specifically, thwarts the enforcement efforts of the brave men and women who serve on our national-security front lines, and endangers innocent Americans and legal residents."

As an example of the latter, Kendoll noted last summer's murder of three people in Woodburn.  Bonifacio Oseguera-Gonzalez, an illegal alien who had been deported six times, is charged with this crime, is incarcerated and awaiting trial.  "If not for ORS 181A.820," Kendoll said, "Oseguera-Gonzalez might have been identified previously as an illegal alien by state or local police and deported by ICE."

OFIR vice president Richard LaMountain points out: "Illegal aliens can and do harm the very people to whom Oregon and its counties and cities owe their foremost responsibility: American citizens.  For this reason, enforcement of U.S. immigration law is not extrinsic, but central, to the duties of state and local law enforcement."

Besides the deaths and injuries to innocent citizens in Oregon caused by illegal aliens, there are significant fiscal costs to taxpayers for services to illegal aliens.

The current threshold for initiatives to be placed on the 2018 ballot is 88,184 signatures of registered Oregon voters, collected by July 2018.

Founded in 2000, Oregonians for Immigration Reform advocates ending illegal immigration and reducing the excessive levels of legal immigration.  In 2014, OFIR spearheaded the successful Ballot Measure 88 referendum by which Oregon voters rejected Senate Bill 833 that would have granted legal driving privileges to illegal aliens.

For further information about OFIR's goals and activities, see the website at:  http://www.oregonir.org.

Oregon's sanctuary law when passed in 1987 was cited as ORS 181.850.  It has subsequently been amended and is now cited as ORS 181A.820.

State firearm, drug charges turn to federal case on man accused of being illegal immigrant

An undocumented immigrant out on bail kept showing up to court in Portland to face state gun and drug charges until federal immigration agents ran his name and took him into custody on a deportation order.

The man's defense attorney described the case as "fairly extraordinary,'' noting his client, Jose Alfredo Bustos-Bustos, followed court orders to appear when necessary, despite the current national crackdown on illegal immigration.

"Only after leaving his third court appearance was he picked up by immigration officials,'' said Assistant Federal Public Defender Stephen Sady.

On Friday, a federal judge ordered Bustos-Bustos, 30, to remain in custody pending trial on new federal charges, including illegal alien in possession of a firearm and possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie B. Beckerman found Bustos-Bustos a danger to the community based on the nature of the alleged offenses...

A fingerprint suspected to be from a child under age 4 was found on the AR-15 rifle, Assistant U.S. Attorney Peter Sax said.

Officers also noticed a statute in the apartment of Mexican folk saint Jesus Malverde -- described by Beal in an affidavit as the "patron saint of drug traffickers.''

Court records in Multnomah County indicate Bustos-Bustos' children were taken into protective custody after his arrest.

He was arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Jan. 25, and the next day, posted 10 percent of his $110,000 bail and was released...

On March 24, according to the federal complaint, Special Agent Shawn Mohr, a deportation officer with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, wrote a report that a computerized check on Bustos-Bustos revealed he faced a previous deportation order out of California. Bustos-Bustos, as a result, was transferred to a federal facility in Tacoma.

The federal complaint was issued April 24. Bustos-Bustos was taken back into custody by Gresham police on April 25 on the federal gun and drug charges...

His wife, Miriam Karina Avila, 25, is out of custody, facing possession and delivery of methamphetamine and cocaine allegations...

Before Bustos-Bustos was returned to federal custody in Portland, Avila was granted permission to leave Oregon to travel to a detention center in Tacoma to visit her husband on weekends, according to court records.

Jose Alfredo Bustos-Bustos, who was out of custody on state drug and firearms charges since a January arrest, has now been detained on new federal charges, including illegal alien in possession of a firearm. A U.S. magistrate judge on Friday ordered he remain in custody pending trial.

Pres. Trump's first 100 days make improvements to immigration enforcement and begin laying the groundwork for worker visa reforms

Tomorrow marks President Donald Trump's 100th day in office, and immigration has been a key component of his 100-day agenda. Thus far, Trump has solely relied on his executive powers to stem the tide of illegal border crossings and beef up interior enforcement. And while he's taken some good first steps in addressing legal immigration, he's yet to take strong action on protecting American workers from the steady flow of cheap foreign labor that drives down wages and increases job competition for workers.

THE HIGH POINTS

Past presidents and candidates have talked tough on immigration, but none have followed through on that tough talk. In fact, a clip from Bill Clinton's 1996 State of the Union Address is one of the most watched videos we've ever posted on our Facebook page (94 million views). But neither Clinton, George W. Bush, nor Barack Obama were ever committed to ending illegal immigration.

Candidate Trump used some of the toughest pro-enforcement language ever during his White House run, and we've already seen its impact. Border Apprehensions -- the measure used to determine overall illegal border crossings -- are at a 17-year low, and the administration has significantly stepped up interior enforcement efforts across the country.

In just his first week after being sworn in, Pres. Trump signed two Executive Orders aimed at securing the border and strengthening interior enforcement. Those Executive Orders called for:

  • Increases in Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents,
  • Increase in immigration judges,
  • Withholding visas from countries that refuse to repatriate deported aliens,
  • An end to catch-and-release,
  • The construction of more detention facilities for detained illegal aliens along the border,
  • Granting Border Patrol access to federal lands,
  • Ending Pres. Obama's Priority Enforcement Program (PEP),
  • Reinstating Secure Communities and encouraging increased participation from local police in immigration enforcement, and
  • Creation of an office for victims of illegal-alien crimes.

Trump needs money from Congress to accomplish a few of the above points, but his Administration has already moved forward on many of the points using existing funds.

LAYING THE GROUND WORK

Pres. Trump will need help from Congress on several more of his immigration priorities, but he's at least started the discussion on a few of them. Most notably, his FY2018 budget request to Congress asked for funding to make E-Verify mandatory for all employers. Congress will need to pass a mandatory E-Verify law to make that request a reality, but budget requests typically reveal the White House's policy priorities for the next fiscal year.

NumbersUSA believes requiring all employers to use E-Verify to end the jobs magnet is the single, strongest step that can be taken in ending illegal immigration and protecting American workers. But over the years, we have also advocated for full implementation of the Secure Fence Act of 2006 that requires double-layered, reinforced fencing along 700-miles of the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump's campaign mantra was to 'build the wall', and while the details of 'the wall' remain a bit fuzzy, he's continued to push for some sort of barrier construction along the border.

The Administration is also off to a good start at ending sanctuary policies. Both Pres. Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions have called for withholding federal funds from jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement efforts. This week, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled that withholding all federal funds from a sanctuary jurisdiction was unconstitutional, but ruled that it may be okay for the administration to withhold federal grants that require local law enforcement to cooperate with federal law enforcement. That's exactly what the Trump Administration aims to do.

There hasn't been much action on legal immigration, but the Trump Administration did step up its efforts in recent weeks on the H-1B issue. The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have put tech employers on notice that any misuse of H-1B visas will be investigated, and Trump signed an executive order last week, calling for a review of the H-1B application process. Current federal regulations require that H-1B applications be awarded through a lottery process, but Trump has called for a new process that would award visas to the most skilled or highest paid applicants.

Pres. Trump has done little, yet, to address permanent, legal immigration, but he did include a strong statement in his Joint Address to Congress in February that called for reforming the current legal immigration system to a merit-based system that serves the national interest. He's also met with Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and David Perdue (R-Ga.) to discuss their RAISE Act, which would end Chain Migration and the Visa Lottery and reduce overall immigration by up to 50%.

AREAS NEEDING ATTENTION

The Trump Administration has continued Obama's unconstitutional executive amnesty, DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Trump said he would end the program on Day 1 of his presidency, but one of his January Executive Orders, calling for a review of all of the Obama-era immigration orders, specifically excluded a review of DACA. While the renewals and decisions over what to do with the current DACA population may be more difficult, his Administration's refusal to stop issuing NEW work permits flies in the face of his clearly stated campaign promise on that issue.

Trump has also allowed the Optional Training Program (OPT) to continue. OPT allows foreign students who graduate from a U.S. college or university with a STEM degree to stay and work in the U.S. for up to two years. The program places recent American STEM students in direct competition with foreign students for jobs immediately after graduation. OPT was started by George W. Bush, expanded by Barack Obama, and has never been authorized by Congress. It would be easy for the Administration to eliminate the program.

Perhaps the most important immigration lesson of the first 100 days of the Trump Administration is that simply sending a strong message of enforcement is enough to begin to dramatically reduce illegal entries. That alone has been a tremendous success. Yes, there are some unfulfilled immigration-campaign promises and some areas that need more attention, but it's only been 100 days. There's clear evidence that immigration enforcement is improving, and there are hopeful signs that legal immigration reductions could be on the horizon.

 
 

 

Pendleton City Council declines sanctuary city status

The City Council took no action on the mostly symbolic measure of making Pendleton a sanctuary city.

At a Tuesday meeting, city resident Shaindel Beers asked the council to declare Pendleton a sanctuary city by adopting an American Civil Liberties Union-endorsed list of nine policies and rules that limited local police cooperation with federal immigration enforcement.

Beers’ request only drew public support from city councilor Scott Fairley, whose motion to adopt the policies died from a lack of a second.

In her presentation, Beers said that although Oregon is already considered a “sanctuary state,” adopting the ACLU’s policies and rules would send a message to undocumented immigrants that Pendleton was a safe and inclusive place.

“A scared population isn’t a safe population,” she said. “If we can make people feel safe and included we would be a better community and a community that people would be proud to be a part of.”

Beers, an English instructor at Blue Mountain Community College, said BMCC already had “safe spaces” on campus, although she was unaware if any other cities in Eastern Oregon had adopted the ACLU’s list.

Thanks to state law, police chief Stuart Roberts told the council that the city was already practicing many of the policies and rules listed by the ACLU.

Roberts said the exception was a rule that required immigration enforcement agents to always wear duty jackets and make their badges visible at all times while in city facilities.

He added that officers don’t usually detain suspects in the police department and rarely come into contact with immigration enforcement.

Roberts said adopting the ACLU policies wouldn’t affect how Pendleton police conduct business or the department’s budget, meaning he didn’t have a strong opinion on the list one way or the other.

Councilor John Brenne worried that President Donald Trump’s threats to strip federal funding from sanctuary cities would hurt Pendleton.

Both Roberts and city attorney Nancy Kerns were unsure if the Trump administration would legally be able to level punitive measures against sanctuary cities.

Sometimes the council’s deliberations resembled glass half-empty or glass half-full argument. While Fairley thought there was no downside to adopting the ACLU policies, councilor Neil Brown saw no upside.

Ultimately, Beers’ request couldn’t find enough supporters on the council besides Fairley and the council took no action.
 

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