crime

Oregon’s Marion County First in Foreign National Crime in March 2017

On March 1, 2017 Oregon’s Marion County had 236 of the 974 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was first in foreign national crime in the state with 24.23 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Marion County residents were harmed or victimized by the 236 criminal aliens incarcerated on March 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

50

21.19%

Rape

47

19.92%

Sodomy

33

13.98%

Homicide

22

9.32%

Assault

15

6.36%

Drugs

12

5.08%

Robbery

12

5.08%

Kidnapping

10

4.24%

Theft

7

2.97%

Burglary

4

1.69%

Driving Offense

2

0.85%

Vehicle Theft

1

0.42%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

21

8.90%

Total

236

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from March 1st, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Marion County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

50

25.38%

Rape

170

47

27.65%

Homicide

137

22

16.06%

Drugs

111

12

10.81%

Sodomy

97

33

34.02%

Assault

76

15

19.74%

Robbery

55

12

21.82%

Kidnapping

26

10

38.46%

Burglary

22

4

18.18%

Theft

19

7

36.84%

Driving Offense

7

2

28.57%

Vehicle Theft

4

1

25.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

53

21

39.62%

Total

974

236

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 236 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Marion County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Marion Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Marion County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

208

88.14%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.27%

Cambodia

2

0.85%

El Salvador

2

0.85%

Marshall Islands

2

0.85%

Russia

2

0.85%

Other Countries

17

7.20%

Total

236

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Criminal aliens from 21 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to state, county and city governmental officials in Marion County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

https://docfnc.wordpress.com/2017/04/17/oregons-marion-county-first-in-foreign-national-crime-in-march-2017/


 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report March 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) March 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,654inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on March 1st there were 974 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; almost one in every fifteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.65 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 974 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on March 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

March 1, 2017

14,654

13,680

974

6.65%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 March 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on March 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

236

24.23%

Multnomah

207

21.25%

Washington

189

19.40%

Clackamas

80

8.21%

Lane

49

5.03%

Jackson

36

3.70%

Yamhill

22

2.26%

Umatilla

21

2.16%

Linn

16

1.64%

Klamath

15

1.54%

Benton

14

1.44%

Polk

14

1.44%

Deschutes

13

1.33%

Malheur

11

1.13%

Lincoln

8

0.82%

Jefferson

5

0.51%

Clatsop

4

0.41%

Coos

4

0.41%

Douglas

4

0.41%

Josephine

4

0.41%

Columbia

3

0.31%

Hood River

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Crook

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 974 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on March 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

197

20.23%

Rape

170

17.45%

Homicide

137

14.07%

Drugs

111

11.40%

Sodomy

97

9.96%

Assault

76

7.80%

Robbery

55

5.65%

Kidnapping

26

2.67%

Burglary

22

2.26%

Theft

19

1.95%

Driving Offense

7

0.72%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.41%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

53

5.44%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from March 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,750

1,553

197

11.26%

Rape

964

794

170

17.63%

Homicide

1,686

1,549

137

8.13%

Drugs

877

766

111

12.66%

Sodomy

1,021

924

97

9.50%

Assault

1,999

1,923

76

3.80%

Robbery

1,536

1,481

55

3.58%

Kidnapping

291

265

26

8.93%

Burglary

1,310

1,288

22

1.68%

Theft

1,096

1,077

19

1.73%

Driving Offense

230

223

7

3.04%

Vehicle Theft

457

453

4

0.88%

Arson

75

75

0

0.00%

Forgery

47

47

0

0.00%

Escape

34

34

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,281

1,228

53

4.14%

Total

14,654

13,680

974

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 March 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 974 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on March 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

785

80.60%

Guatemala

20

2.05%

Cuba

13

1.33%

El Salvador

13

1.33%

Vietnam

13

1.33%

Honduras

12

1.23%

Ukraine

9

0.92%

Russia

8

0.82%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.72%

Marshall Islands

5

0.51%

Cambodia

4

0.41%

Laos

4

0.41%

Philippines

4

0.41%

Thailand

4

0.41%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

70

7.19%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 974 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($92,091.70) per day, ($644,641.90) per week, and ($33,613,470.50) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 974 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,825,395.50).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 974 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.


 

Legislation could prevent some deportations of legal immigrants

SALEM — State lawmakers are considering a change to sentencing law that could help prevent the mandatory federal deportation of legal immigrants convicted of gross misdemeanors.

The proposal is in an amendment to Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s bill:[HB 2355] to discourage racial profiling.

The change would reduce the maximum sentence for a Class A misdemeanor from 365 days to 364 days. A 365-day sentence is one of several triggers for mandatory federal deportation of green card holders, refugees and other legal noncitizens. Other triggers are violent crimes and felonies, said Stephen Manning, a Portland immigration attorney.

The change would have no effect on illegal immigrants.

“This is an equity issue,” said state House Speaker Tina Kotek, D-Portland. “People should not be torn from their families and their communities because of an arbitrary difference between state and federal sentencing law for low-level, nonviolent misdemeanors.”

If adopted, the law would make Oregon uniform with Washington state and California, which already made the change in the last several years.

It would serve to strengthen the three states’ governors’ efforts to create “a zone of inclusivity” along the West Coast, Manning said.

Gov. Kate Brown has been defiant in the face of President Donald Trump’s executive orders limiting immigration and banning refugees, which also have been halted by the courts.

In February, Brown issued her own executive order barring the use of state resources to enforce federal immigration policy. Rosenblum subsequently sought to join Washington’s lawsuit against the Trump administration’s immigration orders.

“Gov. Brown supports the amendment and looks forward to signing the racial profiling bill into law to better protect all Oregonians,” said Bryan Hockaday, the governor’s press secretary.

Kotek requested the sentencing change to be added to an amendment to a bill that requires police to collect data on race when they pull over drivers or pedestrians. The bill is meant to discourage racial profiling by law enforcement.

Kotek made the request after receiving feedback from community groups, law enforcement, immigration attorneys and others working on the racial profiling bill, said Lindsey O’Brien, a spokeswoman in the Speaker’s Office.

Felonies, certain violent crimes and 365-day or greater sentences for gross misdemeanors can trigger mandatory deportation under federal law. Class A misdemeanors in Oregon can range from falsifying information and writing a bad check to fourth-degree assault.

“Shifting to 364 days means our fellow Oregonians are not subject to that very drastic penalty,” Manning said.

As an immigration attorney, Manning said he sees legal immigrants deported for misdemeanor crimes all of the time.

“I couldn’t even count for you how many times,” he said. “It’s extremely painful and sad … and is a form of stigmatization against noncitizens.”

The House Judiciary Committee adopted the amendment and approved the overarching bill in March. No one addressed the significance of the sentencing change at that time.

Reps. Sal Esquivel of Medford, and Mike Nearman of Independence said they oppose the change because they see it as an attempt to circumvent federal law.

“To me that is a way to dodge the federal law,” said Esquivel, who is the son of a legal Mexican immigrant. “You’re on probation when you come here on a green card.”

The two Republican lawmakers co-sponsored legislation this session to outlaw sanctuary city designations and to make English the state’s official language.

Several Oregon cities, including Portland, have declared themselves sanctuary cities for immigrants, and the Trump administration has threatened to pull federal grants and other funding from those jurisdictions.

The bill is now before the Joint Committee on Ways and Means but won’t have another hearing until May, said Rep. Duane Stark, R-Grants Pass, chairman of the Subcommittee on Public Safety.

The Capital Bureau is a collaboration between EO Media Group and Pamplin Media Group.
 

Fast and Furious scandal: Suspected triggerman in border agent's murder arrested

EXCLUSIVE –  The cartel member suspected of shooting and killing Border Patrol agent Brian Terry in 2010 with a gun supplied by the U.S. government was arrested in Mexico Wednesday, senior law enforcement, Border Patrol, and congressional sources told Fox News. 

The suspect, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes, was apprehended by a joint U.S.-Mexico law enforcement task force that included the Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Marshals and the Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC).

A $250,000 reward had been sought for information leading to the arrest of Osorio-Arellanes, who was captured at a ranch on the border of the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Chihuahua. U.S. authorities have said they will seek his extradition.

Terry was killed on Dec. 14, 2010 in a gunfight between Border Patrol agents and members of a five-man cartel "rip crew," which regularly patrolled the desert along the U.S.-Mexico border looking for drug dealers to rob. 

The agent's death exposed Operation Fast and Furious, a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) operation in which the federal government allowed criminals to buy guns in Phoenix-area shops with the intention of tracking them once they made their way into Mexico. But the agency lost track of more than 1,400 of the 2,000 guns they allowed smugglers to buy. Two of those guns were found at the scene of Terry's killing. 

The operation set off a political firestorm, and then-Attorney General Eric Holder was held in contempt of Congress after he refused to divulge documents for a congressional investigation.

Four members of the "rip crew" already been sentenced to jail time in the U.S. Manual Osorio-Arellanes was sentenced to 30 years in federal prison after pleading guilty to first-degree murder in February 2014. 

In October 2015, Ivan Soto-Barraza and Jesus Sanchez-Meza were convicted by a federal jury of nine different charges, including first-degree murder and attempted armed robbery. 

Rosario Rafael Burboa-Alvarez, accused of assembling the "rip crew," was sentenced to 27 years in prison after striking a plea agreement with prosecutors.

The last remaining member of the "rip crew," Jesus Rosario Favela-Astorga, is believed to still be at large.

Lewis & Clark students, faculty push back against controversial speaker as protest continues

When student organizers invited Jessica Vaughan to speak at Lewis & Clark College's International Affairs Symposium, they knew there would be pushback.

The policy director for the right-wing Center for Immigration Studies, recently designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, repeatedly told the audience gathered inside the Agnes Flanagan Chapel that she's not against refugees seeking asylum in the U.S.

"Then how can you explain your Twitter feed?" a professor asked during the Q&A section of the panel discussion Vaughan shared with Galya Ruffer, founding director of The Center of Forced Migration Studies at Northwestern University.

Ads by ZINC
 

"I choose certain cases to share," Vaughan explained...

(She does, it should be noted, also share stories from outlets such as CBS News and The Daily Beast that may be seen as detrimental to the White House's arguments for its stance on immigration and refugee issues.)

The discussion was at times difficult to hear as a protest, organized by Portland's Resistance...20 demonstrators chanted, at times employing the siren feature of a bullhorn...

The protest was organized on Monday after history professor Elliott Young...

Catherine Kodat, dean of Lewis & Clark's College of Arts and Sciences, said student organizers began preparing for the possibility of a protest after the post began to spread...

On at least two occasions, a pair of doors near the stage shook as someone outside pounded on them. A shout of "Nazi scum" could be heard between the sound of boots on wood...

Vaughan's critics Tuesday evening contended that those "certain cases" paint immigrants and refugees in broad strokes, stoking racism against both groups.

"I don't think immigration has anything to do with crime. At all," she said.

The back-and-forth on crime among refugee and immigrant populations was a departure from the debate...

The discussion, moderated by associate professor Heather Smith-Cannoy, was supposed to center around the question of whether countries were obligated to offer refugees asylum within their borders or help them re-settle within their country of origin.

At the outset of the debate, Ruffer thanked the student organizers for their decision to not create a "safe space" but rather promote conversation.

Yet all but three questions from debate attendees were directed at Vaughan, criticizing her previously published works.

Smith-Cannoy may have drawn the loudest applause of the evening when she challenged Vaughan's previous assertions that the Obama Administration released 36,000 undocumented immigrants from detention in 2013 and that 72 individuals from countries listed in President Trump's original executive order had been linked to terrorist activity.

(Both claims had been debunked by The Washington Post and other fact-checking agencies.)

Vaughan pushed back, telling the crowd that her research was open-sourced.

And so it went, until professor Bob Mandel approached the stage to signal the end of the discussion....

Gregory McKelvey, leader of Portland's Resistance, was among those standing outside...

"The people here are intelligent people," McKelvey said. "It doesn't take much for them to argue effectively against people who use made-up facts to make their points."

Attorney General Jeff Sessions Announces the Department of Justice’s Renewed Commitment to Criminal Immigration Enforcement

Attorney General Jeff Sessions today spoke to Customs and Border Protection personnel at the United States-Mexico border in Nogales, Arizona.

In his remarks, the Attorney General announced that he has issued the attached memo to United States Attorneys that mandates the prioritization of criminal immigration enforcement. The memo directs federal prosecutors to focus on particular offenses that, if aggressively charged and prosecuted, can help prevent and deter illegal immigration.

Additionally, the Attorney General revealed that the Department of Justice will add 50 more immigration judges to the bench this year and 75 next year. He also highlighted the Department's plan to streamline its hiring of judges, reflecting the dire need to reduce the backlogs in our immigration courts.

Please find below the full remarks from Attorney General Sessions.

* * *

Remarks Prepared for Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Meeting with Customs and Border Protection Personnel and Immigration Policy Announcement

NOGALES, ARIZONA

Good morning, everyone. Let me start by thanking the brave men and women of Customs and Border Protection, who not only served as our gracious hosts today, but who put themselves in harm’s way each day to secure our borders and protect us.

Here, along our nation’s southwest border, is ground zero in this fight. Here, under the Arizona sun, ranchers work the land to make an honest living, and law-abiding citizens seek to provide for their families.

But it is also here, along this border, that transnational gangs like MS-13 and international cartels flood our country with drugs and leave death and violence in their wake. And it is here that criminal aliens and the coyotes and the document-forgers seek to overthrow our system of lawful immigration.

Let’s stop here for a minute. When we talk about MS-13 and the cartels, what do we mean? We mean criminal organizations that turn cities and suburbs into warzones, that rape and kill innocent citizens and who profit by smuggling poison and other human beings across our borders. Depravity and violence are their calling cards, including brutal machete attacks and beheadings.

It is here, on this sliver of land, where we first take our stand against this filth.

In this fight, I am here to tell you, the brave men and women of Customs and Border Protection: we hear you and we have your back. Under the President’s leadership and through his Executive Orders, we will secure this border and bring the full weight of both the immigration courts and federal criminal enforcement to combat this attack on our national security and sovereignty.

The President has made this a priority — and already we are seeing the results. From January to February of this year, illegal crossings dropped by 40 percent, which was unprecedented. Then, last month, we saw a 72 percent drop compared to the month before the President was inaugurated. That’s the lowest monthly figure for at least 17 years.

This is no accident. This is what happens when you have a President who understands the threat, who is not afraid to publically identify the threat and stand up to it, and who makes clear to law enforcement that the leadership of their country finally has their back. Together, we will drastically reduce the danger posed by criminal aliens, gang members and cartel henchmen.

To that end, the President and I want to do our best to arm you, and the prosecutors who partner with you, with more tools in your fight against criminal aliens. So today, I am pleased to stand here with you and announce new guidance regarding our commitment to criminal immigration enforcement. As we speak, I am issuing a document to all federal prosecutors that mandates the prioritization of such enforcement.

Starting today, federal prosecutors are now required to consider for prosecution all of the following offenses:

  • The transportation or harboring of aliens. As you know too well, this is a booming business down here. No more. We are going to shut down and jail those who have been profiting off this lawlessness — people smuggling gang members across the border, helping convicted criminals re-enter this country and preying on those who don’t know how dangerous the journey can be.
  • Further, where an alien has unlawfully entered the country, which is a misdemeanor, that alien will now be charged with a felony if they unlawfully enter or attempt enter a second time and certain aggravating circumstances are present.
  • Also, aliens that illegally re-enter the country after prior removal will be referred for felony prosecution — and a priority will be given to such offenses, especially where indicators of gang affiliation, a risk to public safety or criminal history are present.
  • Fourth: where possible, prosecutors are directed to charge criminal aliens with document fraud and aggravated identity theft — the latter carrying a two-year mandatory minimum sentence.
  • Finally, and perhaps most importantly: I have directed that all 94 U.S. Attorneys Offices make the prosecution of assault on a federal law enforcement officer — that’s all of you — a top priority. If someone dares to assault one of our folks in the line of duty, they will do federal time for it.

To ensure that these priorities are implemented, starting today, each U.S. Attorney’s Office, whether on the border or interior, will designate an Assistant United States Attorney as the Border Security Coordinator for their District. It will be this experienced prosecutor’s job to coordinate the criminal immigration enforcement response for their respective offices.

For those that continue to seek improper and illegal entry into this country, be forewarned: This is a new era. This is the Trump era. The lawlessness, the abdication of the duty to enforce our immigration laws and the catch and release practices of old are over.

In that vein, I am also pleased to announce a series of reforms regarding immigration judges to reduce the significant backlogs in our immigration courts.

Pursuant to the President’s executive order, we will now be detaining all adults who are apprehended at the border. To support this mission, we have already surged 25 immigration judges to detention centers along the border. I want to thank personally the judges who answered the call to help us with this new initiative.

In addition, we will put 50 more immigration judges on the bench this year and 75 next year. We can no longer afford to wait 18 to 24 months to get these new judges on the bench. So today, I have implemented a new, streamlined hiring plan. It requires just as much vetting as before, but reduces the timeline, reflecting the dire need to reduce the backlogs in our immigration courts.

With the President’s Executive Orders on Border Security, Transnational Criminal Organizations and Public Safety as our guideposts, we will execute a strategy that once again secures the border; apprehends and prosecutes those criminal aliens that threaten our public safety; takes the fight to gangs like MS-13 and Los Zetas; and makes dismantlement and destruction of the cartels a top priority. We will deploy a multifaceted approach in these efforts: we are going to interdict your drugs on the way in, your money on the way out and investigate and prosecute your trafficking networks to the fullest extent of the law.

Why are we doing this? Because it is what the duly enacted laws of the United States require. I took an oath to protect this country from all enemies, foreign and domestic. How else can we look the parents and loved ones of Kate Steinle, Grant Ronnebeck and so many others in eye and say we are doing everything possible to prevent such tragedies from ever occurring again?

Let me finish where I started, by thanking you — the brave men and women in uniform who are at the front lines of this fight. I know we ask a tremendous amount from all of you, but know this: we have your back, and will do all we can to empower you and support you in your work.

God bless you and thank you.

Courthouses as Sanctuaries?

There are over 300 jurisdictions today that obstruct cooperation with federal immigration efforts, by enacting laws or policies prohibiting police agencies from honoring immigration detainers or providing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents with the information needed to identify and apprehend alien criminals.

One of those sanctuaries is Multnomah County, Ore., in which an activist open-borders mentality apparently percolates through all three branches of government.

The county sheriff was recently interviewed after his office released a convicted sex offender rather than tender the alien to ICE on the detainer it had filed — a routine occurrence in that sheriff's office. The sheriff defended his decision by claiming the office couldn't afford to expend resources "toward immigration enforcement". I'm hard pressed to figure out exactly what resources are needed to simply hand an alien criminal over to ICE, or how the community's safety is better served by that choice.

But the sheriff's actions pale in comparison to those of Multnomah County judge Monica Herranz, who is "under internal investigation" after it's alleged that she helped an illegal alien escape from her courtroom rather than end up in the hands of waiting ICE agents. She apparently escorted him through back corridors available only to court employees and on to freedom. This happened in late February. ICE agents brought it to the attention of the U.S. Attorney's Office, whose chief, Billy Williams, an Obama administration appointee, apparently then simply took the complaint back to the Multnomah County judiciary for said "internal investigation" rather than do his job by convening a grand jury to begin the process of indicting and prosecuting Judge Herranz for harboring and shielding from detection an alien illegally in the United States — a federal felony (see 8 U.S.C. Sec. 1324(a)(1)(A)(iii)).

It's been more than a month now and there is little reason to think that the matter is being handled in any way other than sweeping it under the rug. I'm presuming that Williams was one of those Obama holdovers whose resignation was recently requested by new Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (I hope so.) Perhaps it's time for someone under Sessions' leadership at the Department of Justice (DOJ) to revisit the patently obvious shuffling-off of this outrageous and prosecutable offense, and to direct the U.S. Attorney's Office to do its job.

But following on the heels of this judge's disgraceful and illegal conduct — assuming it to be true, and all indications are that it is — how has the judiciary generally reacted?

Rather than express outrage at the conduct, or speak in a measured way about the proper role of the judiciary, California's chief justice weighed in to blast renewed federal immigration enforcement efforts under the new administration, and called ICE presence at courthouses an assault against the rule of law.

Washington State's chief justice also got involved and wrote to John Kelly, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), to urge him to direct ICE agents to stay away from courthouses by declaring them to be "sensitive locations".

Since then, both DOJ and DHS have rejected the suggestion that courthouses should be put off limits, and they're right to have done so. Think about the whole thing for a moment: officers of the law being told that courthouses, those bastions of the law, are out of bounds? How logical is that?

At any rate, judges need to accept the reality that ICE agents are at those courthouses because it is one of the few avenues available to them to take alien criminals into custody when it becomes evident that the police or sheriff's office refuse to cooperate. It would be in everyone's best interest that custody transfers take place in a secure location like a county jail — but when that opportunity is by denied to them by foolish and misplaced sanctuary policies, ICE agents go where they must to do their jobs.

Of course, following the declination of DHS and DOJ to pursue such a course, along comes a member of Congress to file a bill attempting to force the matter through enactment of a law. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, from Oregon (no surprise), has joined with several other Democratic colleagues to introduce the "Protecting Sensitive Locations Act".

This is typical. If Democrats had their way, they would simply legislate away the ability of ICE agents to do their jobs by making the "sensitive locations" list so large and cumbersome that nothing would be left.

It's already been made hard enough in the past eight years through a horrendous admixture of former White House policy, and activist judicial decisions:

Worksites? Nope, pretty much off the table. Why actually do enforcement operations to remove aliens working illegally at various employer sites? Just make the pretense through occasional paperwork audits.

Homes? Heaven forbid! What kind of country is this, you jackbooted minions of the law?

Colleges or universities? How dare you intrude on this sacred institution of learning? Our students need their safe spaces.

Jails, prisons, sheriff's offices, or police booking stations? Absolutely not. How dare you try to "commandeer" our resources by asking for information or trying to take custody of an alien on our premises?

You get the idea.

But to go back to the matter of the judiciary: When asked during his confirmation hearings, newly invested Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch was asked about tweets from the president lambasting the judiciary, which he dutifully lamented in his gentlemanly way, saying among other things, "I find that disheartening and I find that demoralizing."

My own take is that the current atmosphere of disrespect for the judiciary — by the public as well as the president — is in large measure a self-inflicted wound.

The question in many minds is: Why, exactly, do we support an institution, at least at the federal level, in which individuals are given lifetime sinecures for jobs in which they themselves are the only ones who hold the power to decide the limit of their power? This leads ultimately to an unbridled lack of restraint and the inevitable taint of politicization into the third branch of government, the only one of the three intended specifically to avoid that taint.

Perhaps it is time we in America undertook a reformation to see them systemically defrocked of such unlimited lifetime power. After all, the only members of the federal judiciary for whom this appears to be a constitutional requirement (and the language even there is not straightforward) are members of the Supreme Court. Legislative change would suffice for all of the rest.

I am not the first to make such a suggestion, nor to observe that lifetime appointments have not served to preclude politicization of the judiciary. If judges have come to see themselves as demigods, it is our own fault, for we have allowed them to invest themselves with those qualities. A judge who had to consider his future might be more prudent in the present.


 

Oregon’s Multnomah County Second in Foreign National Crime in March 2017

On March 1, 2017 Oregon’s Multnomah County had 207 of the 974 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was second in foreign national crime in the state with 21.25 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Multnomah County residents were harmed or victimized by the 207 criminal aliens incarcerated on March 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Drugs

39

18.84%

Homicide

37

17.87%

Sex Abuse

30

14.49%

Rape

26

12.56%

Robbery

23

11.11%

Assault

17

8.21%

Sodomy

16

7.73%

Burglary

6

2.90%

Kidnapping

6

2.90%

Driving Offense

2

0.97%

Theft

1

0.48%

Vehicle Theft

1

0.48%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

3

1.45%

Total

207

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from March 1st, the total number criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Multnomah County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

30

15.23%

Rape

170

26

15.29%

Homicide

137

37

27.01%

Drugs

111

39

35.14%

Sodomy

97

16

16.49%

Assault

76

17

22.37%

Robbery

55

23

41.82%

Kidnapping

26

6

23.08%

Burglary

22

6

27.27%

Theft

19

1

5.26%

Driving Offense

7

2

28.57%

Vehicle Theft

4

1

25.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

53

3

5.66%

Total

974

207

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 207 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Multnomah County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Multnomah Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Multnomah County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

138

66.67%

Vietnam

10

4.83%

Cuba

8

3.86%

Guatemala

7

3.38%

Russia

5

2.42%

Honduras

4

1.93%

Ukraine

4

1.93%

Egypt

2

0.97%

England

2

0.97%

Ethiopia

2

0.97%

Somalia

2

0.97%

Tonga

2

0.97%

Other Countries

21

10.14%

Total

207

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Criminal aliens from 32 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Multnomah County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to state, county and city governmental officials in Multnomah County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

https://docfnc.wordpress.com/2017/04/11/oregons-multnomah-county-second-in-foreign-national-crime-in-march-2017/

Oregon’s Washington County Third in Foreign National Crime in March 2017

On March 1, 2017 Oregon’s Washington County had 189 of the 974 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was third in foreign national crime in the state with 19.40 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Washington County residents were harmed or victimized by the 189 criminal aliens incarcerated on March 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

47

24.87%

Rape

41

21.69%

Assault

20

10.58%

Homicide

20

10.58%

Sodomy

18

9.52%

Drugs

15

7.94%

Robbery

11

5.82%

Burglary

5

2.65%

Kidnapping

3

1.59%

Theft

3

1.59%

Driving Offense

2

1.06%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Vehicle Theft

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

4

2.12%

Total

189

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from March 1st, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Washington County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

47

23.86%

Rape

170

41

24.12%

Homicide

137

20

14.60%

Drugs

111

15

13.51%

Sodomy

97

18

18.56%

Assault

76

20

26.32%

Robbery

55

11

20.00%

Kidnapping

26

3

11.54%

Burglary

22

5

22.73%

Theft

19

3

15.79%

Driving Offense

7

2

28.57%

Vehicle Theft

4

0

0.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

53

4

7.55%

Total

974

189

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 189 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Washington County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Washington Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Washington County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

147

77.78%

Guatemala

8

4.23%

Cuba

4

2.12%

EL Salvador

3

1.59%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.59%

Honduras

3

1.59%

Ukraine

3

1.59%

Marshall Islands

2

1.06%

Philippines

2

1.06%

Other Countries

14

7.41%

Total

189

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Criminal aliens from 23 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Washington County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to state, county and city governmental officials in Washington County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

https://docfnc.wordpress.com/2017/04/09/oregons-washington-county-third-in-foreign-national-crime-in-march-2017/

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report March 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) March 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,654inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on March 1st there were 974 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; almost one in every fifteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.65 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 974 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on March 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

March 1, 2017

14,654

13,680

974

6.65%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 March 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on March 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

236

24.23%

Multnomah

207

21.25%

Washington

189

19.40%

Clackamas

80

8.21%

Lane

49

5.03%

Jackson

36

3.70%

Yamhill

22

2.26%

Umatilla

21

2.16%

Linn

16

1.64%

Klamath

15

1.54%

Benton

14

1.44%

Polk

14

1.44%

Deschutes

13

1.33%

Malheur

11

1.13%

Lincoln

8

0.82%

Jefferson

5

0.51%

Clatsop

4

0.41%

Coos

4

0.41%

Douglas

4

0.41%

Josephine

4

0.41%

Columbia

3

0.31%

Hood River

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Crook

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 974 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on March 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

197

20.23%

Rape

170

17.45%

Homicide

137

14.07%

Drugs

111

11.40%

Sodomy

97

9.96%

Assault

76

7.80%

Robbery

55

5.65%

Kidnapping

26

2.67%

Burglary

22

2.26%

Theft

19

1.95%

Driving Offense

7

0.72%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.41%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

53

5.44%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from March 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,750

1,553

197

11.26%

Rape

964

794

170

17.63%

Homicide

1,686

1,549

137

8.13%

Drugs

877

766

111

12.66%

Sodomy

1,021

924

97

9.50%

Assault

1,999

1,923

76

3.80%

Robbery

1,536

1,481

55

3.58%

Kidnapping

291

265

26

8.93%

Burglary

1,310

1,288

22

1.68%

Theft

1,096

1,077

19

1.73%

Driving Offense

230

223

7

3.04%

Vehicle Theft

457

453

4

0.88%

Arson

75

75

0

0.00%

Forgery

47

47

0

0.00%

Escape

34

34

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,281

1,228

53

4.14%

Total

14,654

13,680

974

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 March 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 974 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on March 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

785

80.60%

Guatemala

20

2.05%

Cuba

13

1.33%

El Salvador

13

1.33%

Vietnam

13

1.33%

Honduras

12

1.23%

Ukraine

9

0.92%

Russia

8

0.82%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.72%

Marshall Islands

5

0.51%

Cambodia

4

0.41%

Laos

4

0.41%

Philippines

4

0.41%

Thailand

4

0.41%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

70

7.19%

Total

974

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 March 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 974 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($92,091.70) per day, ($644,641.90) per week, and ($33,613,470.50) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 974 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,825,395.50).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 974 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile March 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201703.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated March 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2016 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state.

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