crime

Deportation arrests rise in Rockwood, Latinos say

Breaking a trend, ICE office reports 129 arrests in March.

Deportation agents are stepping up arrests in the Rockwood neighborhood, according to a prominent nonprofit leader in the Latino community.

"What we call the Rockwood area — maybe the David Douglas (School District) — it's always been a no man's land," said community organizer Francisco Lopez. "Nobody pays attention to the area, except ICE."

Lopez heads Voz Hispana Cambio Comunitario, which runs citizenship classes and has organized several marches against U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, also known as ICE.

The organization has identified hot spots in Rockwood (Multnomah County) and the Cornelius and Forest Grove areas west of Hillsboro (Washington County.)

Lopez said more undocumented immigrants are being arrested in these areas than in previous years.

Lopez says the group tracks phone calls from immigrants seeking legal help, which usually arrive after a family member has been picked up.

"The East Multnomah County area has been targeted more aggressively," Lopez argued. "We have seen a lot of phone calls saying, 'They arrested my husband,' 'They arrested my son.'"

The latest numbers from ICE, while not showing a prolonged uptick, do confirm that the business of deportation is continuing as usual.

Deportation officers based in Portland arrested 129 people in March — a big jump — before returning to 68 arrests in April, which is more in line with normal arrest figures.

For comparison, ICE's Portland office made 92 arrests in February and 64 in January. In the three months prior to President Donald Trump's inauguration, October through December 2016, ICE's Portland office made between 71 and 79 arrests each month.

The agency has previously stated it doesn't compile arrest data by location, and it's unclear how many of those arrests occurred in Multnomah County. An ICE spokeswoman notes that those numbers are preliminary and should be considered unofficial estimates.

"Deportation officers carry out enforcement actions every day in locations around the country as part of the agency's mission to protect public safety, border security and the integrity of the nation's immigration system," spokeswoman Rose M. Richeson said in a brief statement.

The large bump in March arrests may be due to a high-profile ICE sweep in Oregon and Washington, which netted 84 undocumented immigrants over a three-day period beginning Saturday, March 25.

Of those arrested during the sweep, 60 had been previously arrested and 24 had no criminal background other than their immigration status, ICE said at the time.

"Man, I'm not surprised," said Lopez after being shown the latest tally. "March was a horrible month in the metro area."

For the newest numbers, ICE also did not specify whether any of those arrests occurred at or near courthouses in Multnomah County.

High-profile deportation arrests at justice centers topped newsfeeds earlier this year, at the same time many county and city officials were loudly re-affirming their commitment to sanctuary status.

Echoing previous reports, a spokesman for Multnomah County Sheriff's Office says undocumented immigrants need to feel safe speaking to uniformed police officers, who don't enforce immigration laws but frequently need the help of eyewitnesses to solve other crimes.

But it's also clear undocumented immigrants who are arrested for non-immigration crimes by local law enforcement are likely to end up on ICE's radar.

For instance, the Sheriff's Office sends all booking records to the state police, who then share that information with ICE.

"ICE may well have access to fingerprint information from the Oregon State Police, but that's not under the Sheriff's purview," explained Lt. Chad Gaidos, an MCSO spokesman. "That's not his decision to disseminate that. He has to follow Oregon state law."

David Olen Cross, a lawful immigration advocate, notes that ICE has access to jail records and other tracking numbers used by the FBI and state law enforcement.

"ICE isn't some separate government entity that doesn't have access to what everybody else does," he said.

Approximately 130,000 unauthorized immigrants live in Oregon, according to the nonprofit pollster Pew Research Center.

Salem Oregon Man Sentenced to 210 Months in Prison for Operating a Drug Distribution Organization

PORTLAND, Ore. – On May 8, 2017, Alfredo Pena-Lopez, aka Gerionda, 43, was sentenced by United States District Court Judge Marco A. Hernández to 210 months in federal prison for conspiracy to distribute or possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine. Upon his release from prison, Pena-Lopez, who was in the United States without lawful authority, will be deported.

For at least five years, Pena-Lopez led a drug trafficking operation responsible for distributing large quantities of methamphetamine and cocaine from sources in California and Mexico to customers in the Salem area. He sold methamphetamine in pound quantities after arranging to bring 5 to 10 pounds into Oregon at a time. Court-authorized wiretaps and surveillance showed that Pena-Lopez stored his methamphetamine in a U-Haul truck parked at an automobile-repair business in Salem operated by one of Pena-Lopez’s seven co-defendants. Pena-Lopez also personally delivered methamphetamine to his customers, including once at a McDonald’s in the Salem area, and once at a Flying J Truck Stop on Interstate 5 near Salem.

At the time of his arrest on federal charges, Pena-Lopez was storing three pounds of methamphetamine, three assault rifles and body armor at the automobile-repair business in Salem, and had $35,000 in cash at his home.

This case was investigated by the Salem office of the Drug Enforcement Administration, with assistance from the Salem Police Department and investigators from the Oregon Department of Justice. The case was prosecuted by Thomas H. Edmonds and Thomas S. Ratcliffe, Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Oregon.
 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report April 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) April 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,644 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on April 1st there were 962 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.57 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 962 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on April 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

April 1, 2017

14,644

13,682

962

6.57%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 April 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on April 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

232

24.12%

Multnomah

202

21.00%

Washington

190

19.75%

Clackamas

78

8.11%

Lane

46

4.78%

Jackson

32

3.33%

Yamhill

23

2.39%

Umatilla

21

2.18%

Klamath

16

1.66%

Linn

16

1.66%

Benton

15

1.56%

Polk

15

1.56%

Deschutes

14

1.46%

Malheur

11

1.14%

Lincoln

8

0.83%

Jefferson

5

0.52%

Clatsop

4

0.42%

Coos

4

0.42%

Josephine

4

0.42%

Wasco

4

0.42%

Columbia

3

0.31%

Douglas

3

0.31%

Hood River

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Crook

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 962 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on April 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

193

20.06%

Rape

170

17.67%

Homicide

137

14.24%

Drugs

104

10.81%

Sodomy

94

9.77%

Assault

80

8.32%

Robbery

56

5.82%

Kidnapping

27

2.81%

Burglary

20

2.08%

Theft

18

1.87%

Driving Offense

8

0.83%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.42%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

51

5.30%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from April 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,744

1,551

193

11.07%

Rape

974

804

170

17.45%

Homicide

1,696

1,559

137

8.08%

Drugs

876

772

104

11.87%

Sodomy

1,016

922

94

9.25%

Assault

2,000

1,920

80

4.00%

Robbery

1,536

1,480

56

3.65%

Kidnapping

292

265

27

9.25%

Burglary

1,308

1,288

20

1.53%

Theft

1,101

1,083

18

1.63%

Driving Offense

217

209

8

3.69%

Vehicle Theft

467

463

4

0.86%

Arson

74

74

0

0.00%

Forgery

45

45

0

0.00%

Escape

36

36

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,262

1,211

51

4.04%

Total

14,644

13,682

962

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 April 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 962 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on April 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

773

80.35%

Guatemala

20

2.08%

El Salvador

13

1.35%

Vietnam

13

1.35%

Cuba

12

1.25%

Honduras

12

1.25%

Russia

9

0.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.73%

Ukraine

7

0.73%

Marshall Islands

6

0.62%

Cambodia

4

0.42%

China

4

0.42%

Laos

4

0.42%

Philippines

4

0.42%

Thailand

4

0.42%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

67

6.96%

Total

962

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 April 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 962 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,957.10) per day, ($636,699.70) per week, and ($33,199,341.50) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 962 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,419,266.50).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 962 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile April 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201704.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated April 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2016 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state.

David Olen Cross
Cell Phone: 503.991.2089
E-mail: davidolencross@hotmail.com

ORP Chair calls out Portland and it's handling of the May Day "Parade for Rioters"

It's not Trump or Republicans; Portland has a riot problem  - May 6, 2017

by Bill Currier

On Monday, protesters all over the world marched on behalf of world socialism, communism, and a bunch of other causes popular with the political left. In Portland, they rioted. To be fair, many protesters did not riot, but the ones who did showed that they rule the streets of Portland. The rioters were clad in black with scarves covering their faces, burning things, breaking windows, damaging property, and terrorizing afternoon commuters just trying to get home.

In other words, it was a Parade for Rioters.

Meanwhile, two days earlier on Saturday, April 29th, the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade and Carnival was canceled, courtesy of the threats issued by the same despicable thugs...

The stated goal of these groups is to label anyone that they object to as being "fascist" and to "shut them down." They boast about "how much power" they have, that "the police cannot stop" them, they openly threaten to "endanger future parades," and add that their threats are "non-negotiable." They are indeed "anti-free speech" groups and live up to the very definition of "fascist" themselves.

It's time to face it: First and foremost, Portland has a "riot" problem, not a Trump problem or a Republican problem. The strategy of appeasing rioters at the expense of the law-abiding citizens and business owners has entirely failed, and the people have had enough of it...
 
Local authorities must do more than catch and release these rioters...

It is time for public officials to "shut down" these groups and put them out of business in Oregon and elsewhere...

If our state and local leaders can't bring themselves to do this, and particularly if their political sympathies or fears are preventing them from doing so, then Portland and Oregon have a much bigger problem to solve.

Which is it gonna be: Family-friendly parades or Parades for Rioters?

Bill Currier is the chairman of the Oregon Republican Party.

Read the full article and comments online:  http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2017/05/its_not_trump_or_rep...

Driver who ran over girls playing in leaf pile has conviction overturned

The Oregon Court of Appeals has reversed the conviction of a young woman who killed two girls in 2013 when she ran over them...

There was insufficient evidence to establish beyond a reasonable doubt that Cinthya Garcia-Cisneros knew or had reason to know she injured stepsisters...

Authorities said the girls were likely lying in a large mound of leaves on the street in October 2013...

The Appeals Court said Oregon law doesn't require a driver to return to the scene of an accident after leaving and later learning that someone else was injured or killed.

...Garcia-Cisneros testified during her trial in January 2014 that she felt a bump while driving over the leaves, but thought she'd run over a rock.

...The boy returned home and told his sister she might have hit two children. She was arrested the next day.

A Washington County Circuit Court jury convicted Garcia-Cisneros, then 19, of failure to perform the duties of a driver. Judge Rick Knapp later sentenced her to three years of probation and 250 hours of community service.

Prosecutors argued Oregon's hit-and-run law required Garcia-Cisneros to go back to the crash site after she learned someone may have been hurt. Garcia-Cisneros initially sought an acquittal citing insufficient evidence to prove her guilt, but it was denied by the lower court. She later appealed her conviction.

Garcia-Cisneros' attorney said during the trial that she was shocked and in a state of denial after she found out about the children...

Garcia-Cisneros told the girls' parents during her sentencing hearing that she should have returned to the scene and asked for forgiveness. The girls' mother, Susan Dieter-Robinson, said they did forgive her.

After her conviction, Garcia-Cisneros was taken to the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma because she wasn't an American citizen....

Her conviction put her in danger of deportation, but an immigration judge dismissed her case in August 2014 and she was released from custody....

CA Sheriff Hits Back at "Sanctuary State" Rhetoric by Showing Just Who Would be Protected

Much attention has been given to the antics of crazy California politicians like Kamala Harris, Kevin de Leon, and Nancy Pelosi, who all advocate for sanctuary city/state policies and call anyone opposed to their view racist or "white supremacist" - and can somehow say with a straight face that this policy doesn't put Americans at risk.

But, there are elected officials and law enforcement officers in the state who strongly oppose these policies and, in particular, Senate Bill 54, which would prohibit law enforcement agencies in the state from using "agency or department moneys, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to investigate, interrogate, detain, detect, or arrest persons for immigration enforcement purposes."

Law enforcement associations have made their concerns known, but since SB 54 has passed the Senate, the Ventura County Sheriff's Department is taking their concerns straight to the public, posting a "rap sheet" of some of the actual Ventura County inmates recently detained by ICE. 

As a follow-up to our concerns over Senate Bill 54, we would like to provide more factual information regarding the types of individuals that would be released into our community if immigration authorities are not allowed in our jail as would be mandated by this bill. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has continued to review inmates in the jail who might have possibly been in the country illegally.

The report stated that ICE had detained 50 inmates in the last 30 days, but the county averages 1,373 ICE detainers a year. All but one of the 50 had either a prior arrest history, current felony charges, or prior deportation orders (yet found themselves in jail again). The Sheriff's Department then posted a sample of the charges of those detained by ICE:

  • Inmate 1 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – drunk driving; stealing a vehicle; hit and run; drunk in public; under the influence of a controlled substance; possession of drugs; possession of drug paraphernalia 
  • Inmate 2 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; dissuading a victim from testifying; obstructing the use of a communication devices to prevent summoning assistance; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence (twice); assault with a deadly weapon; child endangerment; illegal entry; previously deported 
  • Inmate 3 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; false imprisonment; resisting arrest; kidnapping; Prior Arrests – sexual battery; burglary; robbery; false information to a peace officer; brandishing a weapon; false imprisonment; kidnapping; stealing a vehicle; illegal entry; previously deported 
  • Inmate 4 Current Arrest – possession of a controlled substance for sale; transportation of a controlled substance (twice); driving on a suspended license; Prior Arrests – battery (twice); drunk in public; vandalism; transportation, sales, or distribution of a dangerous drug; transportation of a controlled substance; drunk driving (twice)
  • Inmate 5 Current Arrest – felony drunk driving; driving without an ignition interlock device; driving on a suspended license; Prior Arrests – lewd acts with a child under 14; driving on a suspended drivers’ license (five times); drunk driving (twice); unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor 
  • Inmate 6 Current Arrest – assault with a deadly weapon; attempted kidnapping; Prior Arrests – possession of drugs (twice); possession of drug paraphernalia (three times); prowling; theft (twice); false information to a peace officer (twice); drunk in public; robbery (three times); felony domestic violence; assault with a deadly weapon (three times); kidnapping (twice) 
  • Inmate 7 Current Arrest – domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony criminal threats (twice); domestic violence (twice); child endangerment; driving without a license; driving with a suspended license; possession of drugs; theft (twice); possession of stolen property; false information to a peace officer; stealing a vehicle; illegal entry
  • Inmate 8 Current Arrest – kidnapping; false imprisonment; lewd acts with a child under 14; Prior Arrests – resisting arrest; under the influence of drugs (twice); kidnapping; lewd acts with a child under 14, drunk in public 
  • Inmate 9 Current Arrest – warrant for resisting arrest, false information to a peace officer, domestic violence, violation of a domestic violence court order; Prior Arrests – brandishing a weapon; felony domestic violence; felony criminal threats; drunk in public (twice); violation of a domestic violence court order (three times); vandalism; domestic violence (twice); resisting arrest (twice); false information to a peace officer 
  • Inmate 10 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence; previously deported
  • Inmate 11 Current Arrest – possession of a short barreled shotgun; Prior Arrests – assault with a deadly weapon, possession of a short barreled shotgun (twice), assault, carrying a concealed firearm, illegal entry 
  • Inmate 12 Current Arrest – under the influence of drugs; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence, burglary, inflicting injury to a child, under the influence of drugs, resisting arrest, unlicensed driver, drunk driving, possession of drug paraphernalia, false information to a peace officer 
  • Inmate 13 Current Arrest – possession of drugs for sale; Prior Arrests – possession of drugs for sale (twice); previously deported 
  • Inmate 14 Current Arrest – under the influence of drugs; Prior Arrest – member of a street gang, assault with a deadly weapon, conspiracy, possession of drugs, drunk driving, trespassing 
  • Inmate 15 Current Arrest – felony domestic violence; Prior Arrests – felony domestic violence; child endangerment; false imprisonment; domestic battery; drunk driving; hit and run

Members of gangs, drug dealers, sex offenders, pedophiles, assault with a deadly weapon, repeat drunk drivers, repeat domestic violence, violating court orders - yeah, these are not harmless people just looking for a way to have a better life. Good for you, Sheriff, on giving the people you're sworn to protect the facts.

State firearm, drug charges turn to federal case on man accused of being illegal immigrant

An undocumented immigrant out on bail kept showing up to court in Portland to face state gun and drug charges until federal immigration agents ran his name and took him into custody on a deportation order.

The man's defense attorney described the case as "fairly extraordinary,'' noting his client, Jose Alfredo Bustos-Bustos, followed court orders to appear when necessary, despite the current national crackdown on illegal immigration.

"Only after leaving his third court appearance was he picked up by immigration officials,'' said Assistant Federal Public Defender Stephen Sady.

On Friday, a federal judge ordered Bustos-Bustos, 30, to remain in custody pending trial on new federal charges, including illegal alien in possession of a firearm and possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie B. Beckerman found Bustos-Bustos a danger to the community based on the nature of the alleged offenses...

A fingerprint suspected to be from a child under age 4 was found on the AR-15 rifle, Assistant U.S. Attorney Peter Sax said.

Officers also noticed a statute in the apartment of Mexican folk saint Jesus Malverde -- described by Beal in an affidavit as the "patron saint of drug traffickers.''

Court records in Multnomah County indicate Bustos-Bustos' children were taken into protective custody after his arrest.

He was arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Jan. 25, and the next day, posted 10 percent of his $110,000 bail and was released...

On March 24, according to the federal complaint, Special Agent Shawn Mohr, a deportation officer with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, wrote a report that a computerized check on Bustos-Bustos revealed he faced a previous deportation order out of California. Bustos-Bustos, as a result, was transferred to a federal facility in Tacoma.

The federal complaint was issued April 24. Bustos-Bustos was taken back into custody by Gresham police on April 25 on the federal gun and drug charges...

His wife, Miriam Karina Avila, 25, is out of custody, facing possession and delivery of methamphetamine and cocaine allegations...

Before Bustos-Bustos was returned to federal custody in Portland, Avila was granted permission to leave Oregon to travel to a detention center in Tacoma to visit her husband on weekends, according to court records.

Jose Alfredo Bustos-Bustos, who was out of custody on state drug and firearms charges since a January arrest, has now been detained on new federal charges, including illegal alien in possession of a firearm. A U.S. magistrate judge on Friday ordered he remain in custody pending trial.

CBP Officers Catch Man Wanted for Sexual Assault of a Minor and Burglary as he Headed to Mexico

SAN DIEGO — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the San Ysidro port of entry yesterday took an undocumented man into custody, who was wanted for sexual assault of a minor and burglary, as he was attempting to enter into Mexico.

On Wednesday, April 26, Santiago Flores-Martinez, a 48-year-old undocumented Mexican citizen, was attempting to enter Mexico when he was stopped by the port’s Anti-Terrorism Contraband Enforcement Team (A-TCET) who was conducting southbound inspections of travelers.

A CBP officer conducted a query to get biometric information on the man via the “Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System” (IAFIS). CBP officers confirmed Flores-Martinez was an exact match to active National Crime Information Center (NCIC) arrest warrants out of Clackamas County, Oregon, on charges of sexual assault of a minor and first degree burglary stipulating no bail.

“CBP officers routinely encounter and stop dangerous fugitives, attempting to depart the United States,” said Pete Flores, director of field operations for CBP in San Diego. “Working with our law enforcement partners is not only critical but necessary in order to ensure justice is served.”

After the warrants were confirmed, CBP officers turned over custody of Flores-Martinez to the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS). He will be extradited to Oregon to face charges.

CBP officers put an immigration detainer on Flores so that after the judicial process he will be returned to DHS custody.

Criminal charges are merely allegations. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

For more information about this case, please click on link to read a news release from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office: http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/pressreleases/2017-03-01-CCSOPR-SexAssaultSuspectSketch.html


For statistics on more of our apprehensions, please visit our CBP Enforcement Statistics webpage.

For statistics on criminal aliens apprehended, please visit our Criminal Alien Statistics webpage.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

BREAKING NEWS: DHS Announces Launch of new Office for Victims of Illegal Immigrant Crime

Alert date: 
2017-04-26
Alert body: 

For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

Office built with input from victims impacted by crime.

WASHINGTON – Today, Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly announced the official launch of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement Office (VOICE).  The VOICE office will assist victims of crimes committed by criminal aliens.

ICE built the VOICE office in response to the Executive Order entitled Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States, which directed DHS to create an office to support victims of crimes committed by criminal aliens.

“All crime is terrible, but these victims are unique—and too often ignored,” said Secretary Kelly. “They are casualties of crimes that should never have taken place—because the people who victimized them often times should not have been in the country in the first place.

The key objectives of the VOICE office are:

  • Use a victim-centered approach to acknowledge and support victims and their families.
  • Promote awareness of available services to crime victims.
  • Build collaborative partnerships with community stakeholders assisting victims.

ICE has established a toll-free hotline staffed with operators who will triage calls to ensure victims receive the support they need. The number is 1-855-48-VOICE or 1-855-488-6423.

The types of assistance people impacted by crimes committed by illegal aliens can expect include:

  • Local contacts to help with unique victim requests
    • ICE community relations officers will serve as a local representative explaining to victims what information is available and to help victims understand the immigration enforcement and removal process.
  • Access to social service professionals able to refer victims to resources and service providers
  • ICE has a cadre of 27 victim assistance specialists located across the country available to direct victims to a wide range of resources. The victim assistance specialists possess a high degree of specialized victim assistance expertise and training.
  • The DHS-Victim Information and Notification Exchange (DHS-VINE) is an automated service being launched today that will help victims track the immigration custody status of illegal alien perpetrators of crime. More information about DHS-VINE and how to sign-up to receive automated alerts can be found at: https://vinelink.dhs.gov.
  • ICE will work with requesting individuals to determine what releasable information is available to victims about an alien involved in a crime.
  • Assistance signing-up to receive automated custody status information
  • Additional criminal or immigration history may be available about an illegal alien to victims or their families

ICE is employing a measured approach to building the VOICE office—meaning that it intends to expand the services VOICE offers in the future. This approach allows the office to provide immediate services to victims, but will also allow the agency to collect metrics and information to determine additional resource needs and how the office can best serve victims and their families moving forward.

Suspect in sex assault of 9-year-old girl had been deported to Mexico

Oregon police were hunting an ex-con Mexican national accused of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old Portland girl while her younger sister slept just a few feet away.

Previously-deported Santiago Martinez-Flores, 48, has a decades old criminal history and already served time for assault, criminal mischief, unauthorized use of a vehicle and failure to perform the duties of a driver. He was deported in March 2001 after a two-year prison sentence but made his way back to the U.S. sometime before the February sexual assault in which he’s suspected, Fox 12 reported.

The girl was sexually assaulted as she slept in her apartment on Feb. 26, according to investigators. But she woke up during the incident and, after the intruder tried to hold her down, the girl was able to break free and run to her parents’ room, officials said.

The girl’s father quickly retrieved a gun and ran to confront the man, who had already escaped. However, the girl was able to describe her attacker and authorities said they found physical evidence linking Martinez-Flores to the crime.

Martinez-Flores may be using the alias “Felipe Coeto” or “Isidro Ramos Flores.”

“It's a terrible thing, and to have somebody take advantage of a child like that I think is one of the worst things that a human being can do,” neighbor Debra Griffith told KATU2. “I hope they put them away for a long, long time.”

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