About OFIR - Oregonians For Immigration Reform

OFIR's History

Oregonians for Immigration Reform was organized in 2000 by Frank Brehm, Jim Ludwick, and Elizabeth Van Staaveren. There had been an earlier organization of the same name, led by Sharon Sheppard, which functioned from about 1993 to 1997.

In January 2000, plans for organizing a new OFIR began to be laid. In June 2000, a letter was mailed to prospective members inviting them to join together in creating OFIR. On the basis of positive responses, the first meeting was held on Sept. 18, 2000, in Wilsonville. The group functioned for several months informally, without officers, although by-laws were adopted at the Feb. 24, 2001 meeting. At the meeting on June 2, 2001, Vern Cook brought up the need for a titular head of OFIR, and members voted to name these officers temporarily: Jim Ludwick, President; Frank Brehm, Vice President; Elizabeth Van Staaveren, Secretary and Treasurer. At the meeting on Nov. 10, 2001, those officers were formally elected.

There have been several changes in officers and Board members over the years. Jim Ludwick, served as OFIR’s President from June 2001 until November 2010, when Cynthia Kendoll was appointed by the Board to serve the remainder of his term which was to end in November 2011. In November 2011, Cynthia Kendoll was elected President of OFIR, and Richard F. La Mountain, Vice President, with Mr. Ludwick, retiring President, continuing to serve as Director of Communications and Legislative Liaison with the State Legislature.
 
Current (2017) officers are:  Cynthia Kendoll – President; Richard F. LaMountain – Vice President; Jim Ludwick, Communications Director; Lyneil Vandermolen – Secretary; Rep. Mike Nearman – Member at Large.
 
All officers and Board members serve as unpaid volunteers. Some of their expenses are reimbursed when occasioned by OFIR duties. Due to the growth of membership in recent years, a bookkeeper is employed part-time to manage financial records of OFIR and OFIR PAC. OFIR does not receive any grants from the government, unlike many organizations and lobbies advocating for massive immigration and illegal immigrants. OFIR is a group of citizens concerned for the future of our country and working to assure that the national interest comes first in immigration matters – specifically, that illegal immigration be stopped and legal immigration reduced to environmentally and socially sustainable numbers.

Since OFIR was established, immigration – especially illegal immigration – has become a much more visible issue state-wide and nationally. We count among our achievements, passage of the 2008 bill requiring proof of citizenship to obtain an Oregon driver license, and the defeat of bills granting instate tuition to illegal aliens introduced in each session in the state Legislature from 2003 through 2011.

The 2013 Oregon Legislature, despite OFIR's continued efforts to educate Legislators about the negative effects of such legislation, passed an in-state tuition bill for illegal alien students and included an emergency clause so that citizens could not contest the new law. It has already been implemented.

However, our most recent success is the citizen's veto referendum petition drive to overturn SB 833 - a new law giving state issued ID, in the form of driver privilege cards, to illegal aliens. Protect Oregon Driver Licenses collected enough signatures from concerned citizens across the state to qualify for the November 2014 ballot as Ballot Measure 88.

Ballot Measure 88 was defeated with 66% of Oregonians voting NO - nearly a million voters!  Thirty five of thirty six counties defeated Measure 88. 

For more information about the Measure 88 campaign - please visit our dedicated campaign website: http://www.protectoregondl.org/

 

Principles of Oregonians for Immigration Reform

 
Oregonians for Immigration Reform believes that the first duty of government is to protect the safety and well-being of its citizens. Every nation has the right to decide how many and which non-citizens may enter or settle there. Immigration laws exist to carry out that mandate, and must be written with the safety and well-being of citizens as the primary goal, then fully and faithfully enforced.
 
Every American citizen has the Constitutional right to advocate for immigration at levels they believe are appropriate. For the first 200 years of our nation we averaged about 236,000 immigrants per year, and we grew into the most successful nation in history.  Current immigration levels of over 1.5 million a year are unsustainable for us environmentally, socially, fiscally and politically.  Immigration at that level dissuades assimilation of new immigrants into becoming Americans.  We need to return to our traditional levels of immigration.
 
We believe that FAIR, the Federation for American Immigration Reform, is correct in stating:  “America has reached a point where perpetual growth cannot realistically continue within limited space. … without common sense limitations on immigration and the resulting population growth, virtually every social cause is a lost cause.”
 
Also, from NumbersUSA: “A succession of scientific and governmental commissions for three decades have come to the same conclusion - that there is a scientific rationale for stabilizing the U.S. population in order to meet environmental goals. While national environmental groups have dramatically changed their stance on U.S. population stabilization, government and scientific bodies have not. …”
 
FAIR issues an agenda for Congressional legislation periodically.  Here is the agenda for the 115th Congress (2017-2018):  ihttp://www.fairus.org/DocServer/GR/115th_Agenda_web.pdf.  This is a detailed list of steps needed to repair deficiencies and problems in the present immigration system.
 
OFIR also supports the recommendations of the Center for Immigration Studies’ expert on immigration law enforcement, in her testimony to Congress in March 2017, Restoring Enforcement of Our Nation's Immigration Laws, U.S. House Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security.