cost

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report February 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) February 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,594 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on February 1st there were 967 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.63 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 967 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on February 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

February 1, 2017

14,594

13,627

967

6.63%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 February 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on February 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

234

24.20%

Multnomah

203

20.99%

Washington

191

19.75%

Clackamas

80

8.27%

Lane

49

5.07%

Jackson

34

3.52%

Yamhill

22

2.28%

Umatilla

21

2.17%

Linn

16

1.65%

Benton

14

1.45%

Klamath

14

1.45%

Polk

14

1.45%

Deschutes

11

1.14%

Malheur

11

1.14%

Lincoln

8

0.83%

Jefferson

6

0.62%

Clatsop

5

0.52%

Coos

5

0.52%

Douglas

4

0.41%

Josephine

4

0.41%

Crook

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Columbia

2

0.21%

Hood River

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

967

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 967 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on February 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

190

19.65%

Rape

172

17.79%

Homicide

136

14.06%

Drugs

112

11.58%

Sodomy

96

9.93%

Assault

76

7.86%

Robbery

53

5.48%

Kidnapping

26

2.69%

Burglary

21

2.17%

Theft

20

2.07%

Driving Offense

9

0.93%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.41%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

52

5.38%

Total

967

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from February 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,755

1,565

190

12.14%

Rape

968

796

172

21.61%

Homicide

1,677

1,541

136

8.83%

Drugs

886

774

112

14.47%

Sodomy

1,020

924

96

10.39%

Assault

1,988

1,912

76

3.97%

Robbery

1,530

1,477

53

3.59%

Kidnapping

287

261

26

9.96%

Burglary

1,292

1,271

21

1.65%

Theft

1,099

1,079

20

1.85%

Driving Offense

229

220

9

4.09%

Vehicle Theft

452

448

4

0.89%

Arson

73

73

0

0.00%

Forgery

45

45

0

0.00%

Escape

33

33

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,260

1,208

52

4.30%

Total

14,594

13,627

967

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 February 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 967 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on February 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

779

80.56%

Guatemala

20

2.07%

Cuba

13

1.34%

El Salvador

13

1.34%

Vietnam

13

1.34%

Honduras

12

1.24%

Ukraine

10

1.03%

Russia

8

0.83%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.72%

Marshall Islands

5

0.52%

Cambodia

4

0.41%

Laos

4

0.41%

Philippines

4

0.41%

Thailand

4

0.41%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

68

7.03%

Total

967

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 967 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($91,429.85) per day, ($640,008.95) per week, and ($33,371,895.25) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 967 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,583,820.25).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 967 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile February 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201702.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated February 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2017 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF
 


 

Oregon’s Washington County Third in Foreign National Crime in February 2017

On February 1, 2017 Oregon’s Washington County had 191 of the 967 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was third in foreign national crime in the state with 19.75 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Washington County residents were harmed or victimized by the 191 criminal aliens incarcerated on February 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

45

23.56%

Rape

41

21.47%

Homicide

20

10.47%

Assault

19

9.95%

Sodomy

19

9.95%

Drugs

16

8.38%

Robbery

11

5.76%

Burglary

5

2.62%

Theft

5

2.62%

Driving Offense

3

1.57%

Kidnapping

3

1.57%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Vehicle Theft

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

4

2.09%

Total

191

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from February 1st, the total number criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Washington County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

190

45

23.68%

Rape

172

41

23.84%

Homicide

136

20

14.71%

Drugs

112

16

14.29%

Sodomy

96

19

19.79%

Assault

76

19

25.00%

Robbery

53

11

20.75%

Kidnapping

26

3

11.54%

Burglary

21

5

23.81%

Theft

20

5

25.00%

Driving Offense

9

3

33.33%

Vehicle Theft

4

0

0.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

52

4

7.69%

Total

967

191

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 191 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Washington County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Washington Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Washington County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

147

76.96%

Guatemala

8

4.19%

Cuba

4

2.09%

Ukraine

4

2.09%

EL Salvador

3

1.57%

Honduras

3

1.57%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.57%

Marshall Islands

2

1.05%

Philippines

2

1.05%

Other Countries

15

7.85%

Total

191

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 17.

Criminal aliens from 23 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Washington County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He is a weekly guest on the Lars Larson Northwest Show. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

Nonprofits Helping Illegal Immigrants Took $291 Million From Taxpayers

Taxpayers funded eight nonprofits that serve, protect or advocate for illegal immigrants with more than $291 million between 2012 to 2016, according to an analysis of federal spending data and tax documents Daily Caller News Foundation Investigative Group.

The eight groups — including at least one that endorsed Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in 2016 — provide a variety of support to illegal aliens, ranging from legal and social services to political advocacy.

Ninety-four percent of the public funds — or nearly $274 million — came from the federal government...

The $291 million total in public funding, however, is almost certainly an underestimate...   Additionally, those groups only represent a small sample of publicly-funded pro-illegal immigrant nonprofits.

“At least 684 nonprofits nationwide provide some form of legal aid to immigrants,” a 2013 Urban Institute study said.
 
....The study estimated that California’s 111 nonprofits then providing legal aid to immigrants could serve as many as 22,973 illegal immigrants each.

The Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) received the most in government grants of the eight charities....$255 million — or 87 percent — of the total funding.... A large portion of that money was awarded to assist refugees.

And government grants accounted for 92 percent of the LIRS budget between 2013 and 2015.

LIRS wants to ensure “all migrants and refugees are protected, embraced and empowered,” and seeks to end detention centers, according to its website. Instead, the group advocates for “community-based alternatives to immigration detention” to house “individuals as they await a final decision on their immigration status.”

The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) was the second most publicly-funded charity among the eight analyzed nonprofits, receiving more than $17 million between 2013 and 2015, data shows. Government grants accounted for only a small portion of its revenue.

The group’s 2012 and 2016 990s were unavailable, but NCLR received an average of more than $5 million each year. La Raza’s political action committee endorsed Clinton for president during the 2016 campaign. It was the group’s first-ever presidential candidate endorsement.

La Raza’s president and CEO Janet Murguia is an outspoken critic of President Donald Trump’s immigration enforcement strategies...

Americans For Immigrant Justice received nearly $8 million in government grants between 2012 and 2014 (its 2015 and 2016 990s were unavailable) — the third largest amount among the eight charities reviewed by TheDCNF. Public money accounted for nearly 91 percent of its total revenue, and it annually received $2.6 million on average.

The nonprofit legal defense fund has represented detained illegal immigrants, and cases often involve the conditions of the facilities....

Below are the five remaining publicly-funded nonprofits TheDCNF analyzed.

TheDCNF was highly selective when deciding which charities it would sample. Ultimately, only groups with a national scope and focus that overtly assisted illegal immigrants and dealt exclusively in immigration matters were included.

Nonprofits operating at local or state levels, those more covert about dealings with illegal immigrants, and groups that handle a variety of issues in addition to immigration were excluded.

One group awarded significant public funding that TheDCNF excluded was the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Migration and Refugee Services, since its funding is lumped together with other services it provides.

The Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc. (CLINIC) was the only nonprofit analyzed that responded to requests for comment, besides Americans for Immigrant Justice.

CLINIC initiated its “text4refugees” project with a federal grant of $525,000. Anonymous subscribers receive up to two texts per month from CLINIC about the citizenship application process....

“Our affiliates, the local nonprofit immigration service agencies, are the ones who deal directly with immigrants,” Zapor told TheDCNF. “So, indirectly, some subset of undocumented women who are victims of violence may benefit from the funding. But they do not get any direct ‘benefit’ beyond a better-trained legal representative.”

Follow Ethan on Twitter. Send tips to ethan@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Immigration Impunity

WASHINGTON (March 7, 2017) – In the third of a series of reports on the placement of Unaccompanied Alien Children (UACs) in communities across the country, the Center for Immigration Studies explores the implications of tens of thousands of UACs being entrusted to illegal immigrant sponsors. These sponsors, of whom more than 80 percent are already defying U.S. law by living in the country illegally, often also fail to comply with their responsibilities as sponsors, and the Obama administration simply ignored this non-compliance and the resulting safety consequences.

According to Joe Kolb, a Center fellow and author of the report, "From FY 2014 – FY 2016, 106,802 UACs were placed in illegal alien households throughout the country as a result of Obama administration policies. Approximately 13,000 of these minors skipped out on their immigration court hearings. This represents 36 percent of the cases completed. Of those whose cases have finished, a mere 25 percent have qualified for permission to stay."

View the three UAC reports:

Thirty days after placement, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) calls each household to ensure the child is safe and still residing with the sponsor, attending school, and is aware of court dates. But "only nine percent of parental sponsors, 15-18 percent of non-parental sponsors, and less than half of the youths have been reached in these calls." The lowest rates of participation in the follow up phone calls were the family friend or distant relative sponsors. "For those who aren't reached, there is no further action by ORR and for those who decline to participate there is no penalty or enforcement attached to non-compliance."

Jessica Vaughan, the Center's Director of Policy Studies, stated, "The Obama administration policies on the surge of youth and family arrivals from Central America has been a failure, not only for communities where they have settled but often for the kids too, as many have fallen prey to abuse, exploitation, and conscription into gangs. The Obama administration's overriding goal was to releasing the kids from custody, leaving schools, police, and immigration courts to deal with the problem. The solution has to be to deal with the cases at the border, and to hold family members who have broken our laws responsible for their choices."

Contact: Marguerite Telford
202-466-8185, mrt@cis.org

Bill would provide health care for all kids

More than 17,000 children are currently excluded from the Oregon Health Plan because of their residency status.

To address this, Governor Kate Brown testified Monday before the House Committee on Health Care in support of a bill known as “Cover All Kids.” If passed, House Bill 2726 would extend health care coverage through the Oregon Health Plan to all Oregon children, expanding legislation passed in 2012.

"It is our duty to ensure that our youngest Oregonians have the tools to grow into healthy adults with access to education, health care, and a bright future," Brown said. "Oregon children should have the opportunity to be healthy and ready to learn, and Oregon families should feel confident that a medical event will not dramatically change the trajectory of their lives."

Brown has included the expansion in her proposed budget, allocating $55 million in General Fund money. Brown highlighted the importance of all children having health care coverage in her inaugural address.

Uninsured children are much more likely than insured children to forgo necessary medical care due to costs, and more likely to have unmet medical needs, according to a report by the Campaign for Children’s Health Care.

Additionally, the Oregon Latino Health Coalition cites insured children are 9.7 percent less likely to drop out of high school and 5.5 percent more likely to graduate from college.

The bipartisan legislation currently facing the Oregon State Legislature is co-sponsored by Representatives Alonso Leon, Gilliam, Hernandez, Huffman and Olson and by Senators Boquist, Monnes Anderson, and Roblan.

Fatima Preciado, 18, a Portland State University student and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient, was one of the kids who did not qualify due to her residency.

“Because my siblings and I lacked proper health insurance, we were denied the right to live a normal childhood,” Preciado said in a statement. "Fear and worry instead consumed my everyday childhood.

"My mother struggled severely when it came to purchasing my sister’s medication," she said. "There were times when my sister went weeks without medication, causing her to suffer severe uncontrollable epileptic seizures.”

The Senate Committee on Health Care will hold a hearing on Senate Bill 558, a companion bill, on at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 in Hearing Room B.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report January 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) January 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,617 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on January 1st there were 953 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.52 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 953 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on January 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

January 1, 2017

14,617

13,664

953

6.52

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 January 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on January 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

232

24.34%

Multnomah

201

21.09%

Washington

187

19.62%

Clackamas

76

7.97%

Lane

50

5.25%

Jackson

35

3.67%

Yamhill

22

2.31%

Umatilla

21

2.20%

Linn

16

1.68%

Klamath

14

1.47%

Polk

14

1.47%

Benton

13

1.36%

Malheur

11

1.15%

Deschutes

10

1.05%

Lincoln

8

0.84%

Jefferson

6

0.63%

Clatsop

5

0.52%

Coos

5

0.52%

Josephine

4

0.42%

Crook

3

0.31%

Douglas

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Hood River

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Columbia

1

0.10%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

953

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 953 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on January 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

185

19.41%

Rape

170

17.84%

Homicide

136

14.27%

Drugs

112

11.75%

Sodomy

93

9.76%

Assault

75

7.87%

Robbery

54

5.67%

Kidnapping

26

2.73%

Theft

21

2.20%

Burglary

20

2.10%

Driving Offense

9

0.94%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.42%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

48

5.04%

Total

953

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from January 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,764

1,579

185

10.49%

Rape

974

804

170

17.45%

Homicide

1,672

1,536

136

8.13%

Drugs

889

777

112

12.60%

Sodomy

1,020

927

93

9.12%

Assault

1,973

1,898

75

3.80%

Robbery

1,528

1,474

54

3.53%

Kidnapping

287

261

26

9.06%

Burglary

1,314

1,293

21

1.60%

Theft

1,132

1,112

20

1.77%

Driving Offense

241

232

9

3.73%

Vehicle Theft

456

452

4

0.88%

Arson

73

73

0

0.00%

Forgery

45

45

0

0.00%

Escape

39

39

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,210

1,162

48

3.97%

Total

14,617

13,664

953

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 January 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 953 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on January 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

768

80.59%

Guatemala

20

2.10%

El Salvador

14

1.47%

Cuba

13

1.36%

Vietnam

13

1.36%

Honduras

11

1.15%

Ukraine

10

1.05%

Russia

9

0.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.73%

Cambodia

4

0.42%

Laos

4

0.42%

Marshall Islands

4

0.42%

Philippines

4

0.42%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

69

7.24%

Total

953

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 953 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,106.15) per day, ($630,743.05) per week, and ($32,888,744.75) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 953 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,100,669.75).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 953 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile January 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201701.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated January 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2017 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

 

Will the U.S. take Australia's Unwanted Asylum Seekers

WASHINGTON (February 3, 2017) – A report from the Center for Immigration Studies covers the asylum seeker resettlement deal the Obama administration entered into with Australia, which is currently on hold. President Trump is considering honoring the agreement, which would bring to the U.S. 1,250 detainees – mostly men (1,161 men, 49 women and 44 children) from Iran. But he questions the security risk of offering permanent resettlement to the population who refuse to return to their country of origin or to accept an offer of asylum from Cambodia.
 
The asylum seekers reside at Australia's offshore detention centers on the small island nation of Nauru and on Manus Island, part of Papua New Guinea. The Australian government spent at least $3.6 billion on offshore processing at these detention centers between 2013 and 2016, but is now closing the facilities and hopes to transfer the costs and security risks of resettling these individuals to the U.S.
 
Nayla Rush, a senior researcher at the Center and author of the report said, “Convincing the U.S. to take Australia's unwanted asylum seekers would be a great achievement for Australia, but one of America's worst deals.”
 
Although negotiations between the two governments were ongoing for months, President Obama did not announce the agreement until just a few days after the U.S. presidential election. Australia is unwilling to take the detainees as the nation follows a policy of mandatory and indefinite detention of unlawful non-citizens, including asylum seekers.
 
View the entire report at: http://cis.org/rush/australias-unwanted-asylum-seekers-mostly-iranians-be-resettled-us
 
The detainees were offered the opportunity to return home or to resettle in Cambodia. To encourage resettlement to Cambodia, Australia offered cash incentives of $15,000 per person and promises of family reunification with the same cash amount given to these family members. Five refugees accepted the offer.
 
Rush writes, “The refugee resettlement program is not about 'picking and choosing' one's resettlement country. Resettlement, by definition, is to be implemented when no other viable option is available. Cambodia (or other countries) might not be ideal for asylum seekers trying to reach Australia and family members already settled there. But America is no consolation prize either.”

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report December 2016

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) December 1, 2016 Inmate Population Profile
indicated there were 14,717 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on December 1st there were 957 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.50 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 957 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on December 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

December 1, 2016

14,717

13,760

957

6.50

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 December 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on December 1st that weresentto prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

227

23.72%

Multnomah

206

21.53%

Washington

189

19.75%

Clackamas

75

7.84%

Lane

50

5.22%

Jackson

36

3.76%

Yamhill

22

2.30%

Umatilla

21

2.19%

Linn

16

1.67%

Polk

15

1.57%

Klamath

14

1.46%

Benton

13

1.36%

Malheur

12

1.25%

Deschutes

10

1.04%

Lincoln

8

0.84%

Jefferson

6

0.63%

Clatsop

5

0.52%

Coos

5

0.52%

Douglas

4

0.42%

Josephine

4

0.42%

Crook

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Hood River

2

0.21%

Morrow

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Columbia

1

0.10%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

957

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 16.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 957 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on December 1stby type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

184

19.23%

Rape

171

17.87%

Homicide

136

14.21%

Drugs

113

11.81%

Sodomy

94

9.82%

Assault

78

8.15%

Robbery

54

5.64%

Kidnapping

25

2.61%

Theft

23

2.40%

Burglary

20

2.09%

Driving Offense

9

0.94%

Vehicle Theft

5

0.52%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

45

4.70%

Total

957

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 16.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from December 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,771

1,587

184

10.39%

Rape

977

806

171

17.50%

Homicide

1,672

1,536

136

8.13%

Drugs

900

787

113

12.56%

Sodomy

1,026

932

94

9.16%

Assault

1,965

1,887

78

3.97%

Robbery

1,536

1.482

54

3.52%

Kidnapping

289

264

25

8.65%

Burglary

1,333

1,310

23

1.73%

Theft

1,142

1,122

20

1.75%

Driving Offense

251

242

9

3.59%

Vehicle Theft

447

442

5

1.12%

Arson

75

75

0

0.00%

Forgery

43

43

0

0.00%

Escape

39

39

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,251

1,206

45

3.60%

Total

14,717

13,760

957

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 December 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 957 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on December 1stin the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

767

80.15%

Guatemala

19

1.99%

Cuba

15

1.57%

El Salvador

14

1.46%

Vietnam

13

1.36%

Honduras

12

1.25%

Ukraine

10

1.04%

Russia

9

0.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

6

0.63%

Cambodia

4

0.42%

Canada

4

0.42%

Laos

4

0.42%

Marshall Islands

4

0.42%

Philippines

4

0.42%

Other Countries

72

7.52%

Total

957

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 16.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 957 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,484.35) per day, ($633,390.45) per week, and ($33,026,787.75) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 957 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,238,712.75).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 957 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile December 1, 2016:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201612.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated December 1, 2016.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts 53-DOC/GECO: 3/23/16:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2016 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

Law enforcement hands tied by Oregon Legislature

In 1987, the Oregon Legislature passed a bill making it against the law for our law enforcement officers to enforce the law.  It's time to put an end to this ridiculous loophole known as state statute 181A.820.

How many illegal aliens do you suppose are in Oregon and the only "crime" they have committed is to be in our country illegally - thus breaking our immigration laws?

Think about that for a moment...

Illegal aliens often come to this country illegally to work - which is in violation of our employment laws.  And, they are likely hired by an employer who knows full well that they are an illegal alien.

But, before securing employment, they must first acquire identification.  I hear that one can be bought on the streets for about $75.  It's not a quality ID, but it's enough to pass for the willing employer.   Isn't that against the law - to buy and sell fake identification?  And, whose identity is being stolen?  Yours, mine - or, your grandchild's?

Now, the only in the country illegally, illegal alien needs a way to get to their new found job.  They have a buddy that gets them a car which they proceed to drive to work - without a license or insurance.  That too, is against the law! 

So, please explain how it's a necessity to forego enforcement of our immigration laws to protect those that are only in our country illegally!

The Sheriffs of Oregon have released a statement - I encourage you to read it - then call your elected officials and tell them to repeal State Statute 181A.820

Oregon sheriffs: Quick change in immigration actions 'unlikely'

WILSONVILLE, Ore. - Oregon sheriffs issued a statement Friday explaining the background to their stance on not reporting all undocumented immigrants to federal authorities, due to state law, and how that likely means no immediate change in their agencies’ procedures.

Here’s the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association’s posted “legal analysis,” in full:

Many Oregon residents are asking their local Sheriff how President Trump’s January 25, 2017 Executive Order on Immigration will change local practices. The Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association provides the following analysis of this complex issue. The answer, at least in the short term, is that immediate changes to police practices are unlikely.

All Oregon police agencies are prohibited by state statute, ORS 181A.820, from spending public dollars, resources or personnel to locate or arrest a person whose only violation of law is that they are in the country in violation of federal immigration law.

That statute has been in place since 1987, and unless the Oregon legislature changes it, that law will continue to prohibit Oregon police officers from acting as immigration enforcement officers.

The county or city governing body may enact local ordinances that further restrict police officers in that jurisdiction from cooperating with ICE or otherwise assisting in immigration enforcement. The executive order signed by the President does not directly affect Oregon law enforcement officers – it is binding only upon federal agencies.

If a person is illegally in the country, and commits another violation of law, Oregon police officers are specifically allowed by Oregon law to cooperate by exchanging information with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and Oregon jails do so routinely. We believe Oregon jails are fully compliant with federal law requiring local cooperation in accordance with 8 USC 1373.

Oregon jails do not honor requests by ICE to detain persons past their local release date, because doing so is a violation of the person’s rights and subjects the jail to serious civil liability. See link to court case below.

Oregon jails will hold a person for ICE if presented with a warrant signed by a federal magistrate.

In light of ORS 181A.820, and the fact that the federal court has made it clear that Oregon jails do not honor ICE detainer requests in keeping with the binding federal district court decision, Oregon could be considered a “sanctuary state” under the policies of the Trump administration, and the state may be threatened with loss of federal grant funding.

 At this time, the “sanctuary” definition is unclear. Cities or counties that have declared themselves “sanctuary cities” may also face threats of loss of federal grant funds. There will undoubtedly be legal challenges if the federal government actually does take away federal grant funds for sanctuary states, counties or cities, but there is some legal authority for them to do so.

There are still many unknowns in terms of future federal immigration enforcement policy. Congress could make changes in the federal law, the Oregon legislature could modify state statute, and a city or county could reconsider their level of cooperation with federal immigration authorities. Federal courts will almost certainly weigh in on these issues at some point. Oregon Sheriffs will continue to keep the lines of communication open with federal officials and state partners as this issue unfolds.

For the time being, Oregon Sheriffs are bound to follow state law, which currently only allows exchange of information with ICE when a foreign-born person is arrested. Oregon Sheriffs are also required to follow local ordinances enacted by their county governing bodies. Each Sheriff in Oregon is elected by the people and stands ready to answer law enforcement questions you may have about your county.

Executive Order on Immigration

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/25/executive-order-border-security-andimmigration-enforcement-improvements

ORS 181A.820

https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/181A.820

Oregon court case finding 4th Amendment Violation for honoring ICE detainer request

http://crimmigration.com/2014/04/17/oregon-federal-court-detainer-led-to-fourth-amendmentviolation/

8 U.S. Code 1373 

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/8/1373

Sincerely,

Pat Garrett

Sheriff, Washington County

President, Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association

http://www.ktvz.com/news/oregon-sheriffs-quick-change-in-immigration-actions-unlikely/296477600
 

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