illegal aliens

Senate rejects Trump immigration plan

The Senate rejected legislation based on President Trump's framework for an immigration deal in a 39-60 vote on Thursday, leaving an uncertain path forward for Congress with nearly a million immigrants sheltered by an Obama-era program facing the prospect of deportation.

The measure spearheaded by Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) needed 60 votes to clear a filibuster, but failed to meet the mark.

It was the fourth proposal in a row rejected by the Senate ...

The Grassley measure provided a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million immigrants brought to the country illegally as children. Many of these people could face deportation beginning in March as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is scaled back, though court rulings are complicating that matter.

It also included $25 billion for border security, tougher interior enforcement and new limits on legal immigration.

Supporters of the plan and the White House mounted an intense pressure campaign to win over the 60 votes needed to move forward with their plan.

"The president, in my view, has gone more than halfway to meet the Democrats and resolve this matter..." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said ahead of the vote.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) also called the framework a "reasonable compromise."

And Trump, in a tweet, urged senators to "strongly consider a system of merit based immigration."

"While the Republicans and Democrats in Congress are working hard to come up with a solution to DACA, they should be strongly considering a system of Merit Based Immigration so that we will have the people ready, willing and able to help all of those companies moving into the USA!" he said.

Bolstering the White House, most Senate Republicans backed the measure, despite some concerns about cuts to legal immigration. And Trump won over three Democrats — Sens. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.), Joe Donnelly (Ind.) and Joe Manchin (W.Va.) — all of whom face tough reelection races in deep-red states this fall. 

“I share the President's commitment to border security," Manchin said. "That’s why I voted for his plan. That’s why I fought to ensure the $25 billion he requested for border security was included in the bipartisan deal. That’s why I opposed the Democratic proposal that did not provide a single penny for border security." 
 
Trump and McConnell threw their support behind the Grassley plan earlier this week, bolstering its chances. Republicans are wary of moving forward with an immigration bill that the president doesn't support given that the issue is a political lightning rod amongst the party's base.

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), one of Trump's closest allies in the Senate, warned ahead of the vote that any Republicans who supported a separate bipartisan proposal should be concerned about "their electoral futures.”

But the interior enforcement measures, limits to legal immigration and nixing of the Diversity Visa Lottery program were largely considered nonstarters for Democrats.

"President Trump, since he created this problem by terminating DACA last August, has stood in the way of every single proposal that has had a chance to become law," said Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.).

Republicans tried to pressure Democrats into supporting the measure, making it the fourth of the four proposals to get a vote in the Senate Thursday. But Democrats largely scoffed at the take it-or-leave it set up.

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) separately told reporters that “I think the writing’s on the wall with the Grassley proposal. … Few if any Democrats will vote for it.”

Grassley tried to win over Democratic support by pledging they would be able to offer changes if it overcame an initial procedural hurdle.

"Aren't you at a point where here the Democrats have been pleading for months and months and months for justice," he said, "why would they turn it down?"

Where the Senate's debate goes next is unclear, though Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) told reporters that both sides would keep talking ahead of the March 5 deadline.

Where the Senate's debate goes next is unclear. 

The Trump administration announced last year that they were ending DACA, which allows undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children to work and go to school.

Under that decision Congress has until March 5 to pass a fix. But two court dates have thrown that into limbo.

McConnell said late Thursday afternoon that it had been a "disappointing week" and Democrats "couldn't take yes for an answer." 

And while noting that he had "held up my end of the bargain," the GOP leader left the door open to bringing immigration back up if a plan emerged that could pass both chambers and had the support of the White House. 

"Even though this week has been squandered, this does not have to be the end of our efforts," he said.

 

Oregon bill combats DACA termination, continues college tuition equity

Despite national efforts to end DACA, undocumented students in Oregon will continue to have access to tuition equity if Senate Bill 1563 passes.

Students who are not citizens have historically had to apply for "official federal identification" — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals documentation — before they can be eligible for resident tuition at public universities.

Otherwise, they have to pay non-resident or international tuition costs, which can be three or four times more than in-state tuition per year.

But since the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s deferred action program was terminated in 2017, the department is no longer accepting applications.

The Oregon bill is an attempt to bridge that gap, removing the restriction from undocumented students living in the state and continuing protections put into place in Oregon years ago.

In short, it would allow these students to continue getting access to lower tuition costs, scholarships and other financial aid. 

"This is the only country, the only state and the only home they have ever known," said Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, one of the chief sponsors of the bill. "Pure and simple, they are Americans in thought, word and deed."

Sen. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, Rep. Diego Hernandez, D-Portland, and Rep. Teresa Alonso León, D-Woodburn, are also chief sponsors.

Courtney worked on various bills in the past that sought similar equity for undocumented students, but did not come to fruition, including Senate Bill 10 in 2003 and Senate Bill 742 in 2011. Both passed the Senate but not the House, even with bipartisan support.

However, a Tuition Equity bill was passed via House Bill 2787 in 2013. This session's bill would protect the 2013 legislation, keeping the path to college open for the same students covered before.

"I didn’t know what I was doing at the time. I didn’t know about ‘tuition equity’ or federal immigration laws, we didn’t have DACA or DREAMers," Courtney said. " And the frustration these students felt after working so hard to graduate, only to realize they would be unable to afford college."

Not much opposition was voiced at the Senate Education Committee hearing Wednesday afternoon. However, Sen. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, requested additional stats on how many students would truly stand to benefit from the program.

The students covered by this bill must have been brought to the United States under the age of 16, are younger than 30 years old, do not pose a threat to national security or public safety and have continuously resided in the U.S. for the past five years.

Many of the education committee members, in addition to those listed as chief sponsors, are regular sponsors, including Chair Arnie Roblan, D-Coos Bay, Sen. Sara Gelser, D-Corvallis, and Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton.

"To punish young people brought here by their undocumented parents would be wrong. It would be cruel. It would be un-American," Courtney said. "They are every bit a part of our American family.

"Let’s send Senate Bill 1563 to the Floor," he said.

The work session for the bill was held over to the next committee meeting, scheduled for Monday, Feb. 12 at 1 p.m. in Hearing Room C at the Capitol.

One student's story

Edith Gomez Navarrete was brought to Oregon illegally from Mexico when she was 1 year old.

She graduated high school with honors, earned Bachelor's and Masters degrees and become a fourth-grade teacher at a dual English-Spanish immersion school in Eugene.

And even though she was one of only five students in her high school class to earn a full International Baccalaureate Diploma, she still faced many obstacles accessing higher education.

In 2012, Gomez Navarrete was accepted to Oregon State University and the University of Oregon, but was told she would have to pay international student tuition — close to $30,000 a year.

She was already living on her own and supporting herself. She said it would have been impossible to pay $120,000 for an undergraduate degree plus living costs.

"Undocumented students are ineligible for most scholarships, no matter how hard we work or how strong our academic record because the minimum documentation requirement is permanent residency," she said.

Gomez Navarrete shared her story when testifying at the hearing Wednesday.

She was able to access a school's Tuition Equity program and earn some scholarships as well, but could not access federal aid as an undocumented student.

"Without Tuition Equity, there was truly no possible chance we could ever pay for college," she said. "All we want is an opportunity."

In high school, Gomez Navarrete heard from many friends who saw no sense in even completing high school, because college seemed unattainable. Many dropped out.

"Look what happened when I had the opportunity," she said. "When we talk about the need to diversify Oregon’s teaching force so we can better reach all kids – they are talking about me."

While not all people who are undocumented at Latino, and not all Latino people are undocumented, there is a persistent educational achievement gap for Latino students.

More than 40 percent of Latinos in Oregon have earned less than a high school diploma, compared to only 9 percent of their white counterparts.

Additionally, only 23 percent of Latinos have some college or Associate Degree, only 12 percent have a Bachelor's Degree or higher. These numbers compare to 36 percent and 31 percent for their white counterparts, respectively.

"Oregon needs to pass Senate Bill 1563 to keep these opportunities alive, so young people have a reason to finish high school and have an opportunity to meet their potential," she finished. "We just want to find the chance to do what we were meant to do."

Contact Natalie Pate at npate@StatesmanJournal.com, 503-399-6745, or follow her on Twitter @Nataliempate or on Facebook a www.Facebook.com/nataliepatejournalist.

OFIR and the STOP Oregon Sanctuaries campaign at the Pacific NW Sportman's Show

Alert date: 
2018-02-08
Alert body: 

Stop by and say hello at the Stop Oregon Sanctuaries booth at the Pacific Northwest Sportsman's Show at the Expo Center - through Sunday, Feb. 11.

You'll find us in Building A - booth 445.  Sign the petition to Repeal Oregon's Sanctuary Statute.  Not coming to the Show?  Go to www.StopOregonSanctuaries.org and print out your own single signer sheet.  Simply prnt, sign and mail - it's that easy!
 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report 2017

Evaluation of 12 months of  Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) Inmate Population Profiles for year 2017 indicated the DOC’s 14 prisons incarcerated an average of 14,696 inmates per day.

Unpublished data obtained from the DOC indicated that from January 1st to December 1st of 2017 there were an average of 972 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) per day incarcerated in the state’s prison system; criminal aliens on a daily basis were 6.62 percent of the total prison population.

The number of criminal aliens in DOC prisons in 2017 increased from 953 alien inmates on January 1st to 973 alien inmates on December 1st, an increase of 20 alien inmates, a 2.10 percent increase in alien inmates for the reporting period.

Some background information, all the criminal aliens incarcerated in the DOC prisons were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and have ICE detainers placed on them.

The following four column table reveals a series of monthly first day or second day snapshots on the number of all DOC inmates, domestic inmates, criminal alien inmates, percentage of inmates who were criminal aliens and averages for all the inmate numbers incarcerated in the state’s prisons in 2017.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Daily Total Number of All Inmates

DOC Daily Total Number of Domestic Inmates

DOC Daily Total Number of Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Daily Percent of Inmates W/ICE Detainers

January 1, 2017

14,617

13,664

953

6.52%

February 1, 2017

14,594

13,627

967

6.63%

March 1, 2017

14,654

13,680

974

6.65%

April 1, 2017

14,644

13,682

962

6.57%

May 1, 2017

14,691

13,722

969

6.60%

June 1, 2017

14,708

13,727

981

6.67%

July 1, 2017

14,742

13,756

986

6.69%

August 1, 2017

14,722

13,738

984

6.68%

September 1, 2017

14,760

13,789

971

6.58%

October 2, 2017

14,728

13,757

971

6.59%

November 1, 2017

14,752

13,774

978

6.63%

December 1, 2017

14,739

13,766

973

6.60%

Average

14,696

13,724

972

6.62%

Source: Research and Evaluation 12 DOC Report ICE inmate lists 2017 and 12 Inmate Population Profiles 2017.

The number and percentage of criminal aliens sent to DOC prisons from 15 Oregon counties increased from January 1, 2017 to December 1, 2017.

Marion, Washington, Multnomah and Clackamas counties consistently had the majority of criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total change, increase or decrease, in the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates who were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for the time periods of January 1st and December 1st 2017.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated on January 1st.

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated on December 1st.

DOC Total Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by County

DOC Total Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by County

Marion

232

235

3

1.29%

Multnomah

201

201

0

0.00%

Washington

187

202

15

8.02%

Clackamas

76

82

6

7.89%

Lane

50

39

(11)

(22.00%)

Jackson

35

37

2

5.71%

Yamhill

22

23

1

4.55%

Umatilla

21

22

1

4.76%

Linn

16

14

(2)

(12.50%)

Klamath

14

15

1

7.14%

Polk

14

16

2

14.29%

Benton

13

15

2

15.38%

Malheur

11

9

(2)

(18.18%)

Deschutes

10

13

3

30.00%

Lincoln

8

7

(1)

(12.50%)

Jefferson

6

5

(1)

(16.67%)

Clatsop

5

4

(1)

(20.00%)

Coos

5

4

(1)

(20.00%)

Josephine

4

5

1

25.00%

Crook

3

1

(2)

(66.67%)

Douglas

3

4

1

33.33%

Tillamook

3

3

0

0.00%

Wasco

3

5

2

66.67%

Hood River

2

4

2

100.00%

Morrow

2

1

(1)

(50.00%)

Union

2

2

0

0.00%

Columbia

1

2

1

100.00%

Gilliam

1

1

0

0.00%

Lake

1

1

0

0.00%

OOS (Not county

1

1

0

0.00%

Sherman

1

0

(1)

(100.00%)

Baker

0

0

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0

0

0.00%

Total

953

973

20

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmate lists for 01 January 17 and 01 December 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were harmed and victimized by criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons in 2017.

The number and percentage of criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons for the crimes of sex abuse, rape and sodomy increased in 2017.

Again using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total change, increase or decrease, in the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the state’s prisons by type of crime for the time periods of January 1st and December 1st 2017.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Type of Crime on January 1st

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Type of Crime on December 1st.

DOC Total Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by Type of Crime.

DOC Total Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by Type of Crime.

Sex Abuse

185

200

15

8.11%

Rape

170

175

5

2.94%

Homicide

136

136

0

0.00%

Drugs

112

97

(15)

(13.39%)

Sodomy

93

101

8

8.60%

Assault

75

76

1

1.33%

Robbery

54

52

(2)

(3.70%)

Kidnapping

26

25

(1)

(3.85%)

Theft

21

15

(6)

(28.57%)

Burglary

20

23

3

15.00%

Driving Offense

9

7

(2)

(22.22%)

Vehicle Theft

4

5

1

25.00%

Arson

0

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

1

1

100.00%

Escape

0

1

1

100.00%

Other / Combination

48

59

11

22.92%

Total

953

973

20

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmate lists for 01 January 17 and 01 December 17.

On January 1, 2017 criminal aliens from at least 55 countries were listed as being incarcerated in DOC prisons, while on December 1, 2017 criminal aliens from at least 56 countries were listed as being incarcerated in the state’s prisons.

Throughout year 2017 Mexican nationals were the vast majority of criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons.

Once again using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total change, increase or decrease, in the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates, identifying them by their self-declared countries of origin, who were incarcerated in the state’s prisons for the time periods of January 1st and December 1st 2017.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Self-Declared Country of Origin on January 1st.

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Self-Declared Country of Origin on December 1st.

DOC Total Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by Self-Declared Country of Origin

DOC Total Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers Increase or (Decrease) by Self-Declared Country of Origin

Mexico

768

777

9

1.17%

Guatemala

20

19

(1)

(5.00%)

El Salvador

14

15

1

7.14%

Cuba

13

17

4

30.77%

Vietnam

13

14

1

7.69%

Honduras

11

14

3

27.27%

Ukraine

10

5

(5)

(50.00%)

Russia

9

9

0

0.00%

FSM 1

7

9

2

28.57%

Cambodia

4

4

0

0.00%

Laos

4

5

1

25.00%

Marshall Islands

4

4

0

0.00%

Philippines

4

4

0

0.00%

Canada

3

3

0

0.00%

Other Countries

69

74

5

7.25%

Total

953

973

20

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmate lists for 01 January 17 and 01 December 17.
1 Federated States of Micronesia (FSM).

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost to Oregonians in 2017.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for an average number of 972 criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the state’s prisons for 2017 was approximately ($91,902.60) per day, ($643,318.20) per week, and ($33,544,449.00) per year.

None of the preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profiles for 12 months of 2017:

1 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile January 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201701.pdf

2 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile February 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201702.pdf

3 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile March 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201703.pdf

4 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile April 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201704.pdf

5 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile May 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201705.pdf

6 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile June 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201706.pdf

7 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile July 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201707.pdf

8 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile August 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201708.pdf

9 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile September 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201709.pdf

10 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile October 2, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201710.pdf

11 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile November 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201711.pdf

12 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile December 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201712.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections unpublished criminal alien data for 12 months of 2017:

1 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated January 1, 2017.

2 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated February 1, 2017.

3 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated March 1, 2017.

4 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated April 1, 2017.

5 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated May 1, 2017.

6 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated June 1, 2017.

7 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated July 1, 2017.

8 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated August 1, 2017.

9 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated September 1, 2017.

10 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated October 2, 2017.

11 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated November 1, 2017.

12 - Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated December 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

Suspect accused of sexually assaulting 9-year-old girl was deported 16 years ago

 

Santiago Martinez-Flores - Photo from the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office{ }

A man who was deported to Mexico 16 years ago has been convicted of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old Oregon girl while she slept in her bedroom last year.

The girl's mother told KATU News her 9-year-old and 5-year-old daughters were asleep on the night of Feb. 26 at the Clackamas Trails Apartments when a stranger broke into their bedroom through a window.

After being pinned down by the stranger, the girl managed to escape and run to her mom's room. When they realized what happened, the girl's dad took his gun and went into the bedroom, but the suspect had already escaped through the window.

Deputies were able to find the suspect's fingerprints, the mom told KATU. The little girl was able to recall what her attacker looked like, and helped deputies create a sketch of what he looked like.

Santiago Martinez-Flores, 48, was quickly identified as the suspect in the attack. He was arrested about two months after the attack at the California and Mexico border, about 15 miles from San Diego.

READ MORE: Suspect accused of sexually assaulting 9-year-old girl was deported 16 years ago

Martinez-Flores was charged with unlawful sexual penetration, sex abuse, attempted rape and burglary. He was found guilty Friday, and will be sentenced Monday.

Martinez-Flores has a lengthy criminal history that dates back to 1994. He was deported to Mexico in 2001 after serving two years in the Oregon Department of Corrections.

 

Congressman Ron Wyden holding Towhall meetings this weekend

Alert date: 
2018-02-02
Alert body: 

Have something to say to Congressman Ron Wyden? He would like to see you at one of his upcoming Townhall Meetings this weekend.

Saturday, Feb. 3 - starts at 11:30 am
Astoria High School Auditorium
1001 W Marine Dr., Astoria, OR 97103
 
and
 
Saturday, Feb. 3, starts at 4 pm
Port of Tillamook Bay, Officers Mess Hall
6825 Officer's Row, Tillamook, OR 97141
 
-------------
 
Sunday, Feb. 4 - starts Noon
Century High School Gymnasium
2000 SE Century Blvd., Hillsboro, OR 97123
 
If you attend, please email van@numbersusa.com a brief description of your interaction and the immigration-related discussion. Or, call OFIR at 503.435.0141 and tell us about it.
 
Talking Points for your consideration:
 
You were responsible for shutting down the federal government, not Republicans. And for what? To amnesty illegal aliens. You're playing a destructive political game. You knew negotiations were ongoing. Do not vote for another shutdown.
 
You are pushing a legalization for so-called Dreamers but don't care what caused these young people to be in the country illegally in the first place. Their parents brought them while seeking to work here illegally. We'll be in this situation again unless we make it hard for employers to hire unlawful workers. That's why I want you to support mandatory E-Verify workplace eligibility checks for all employers. Don't subject another generation of young people to the same situation.
 
Our immigration system should help American workers get a decent pay raise and have a higher standard of living. That's why Sen. Tom Cotton introduced the RAISE Act, which would cut legal immigration from about one million per year to 500,000. I strongly support the bill because it will reduce job competition, including for the 50 million working-age Americans not in the workforce. Please co-sponsor the RAISE Act. Stand with American workers, not anti-American business owners who want more job competition to reduce wages.
 
The Visa Lottery must be terminated because it threatens our national security, as evidenced by the October 31 New York City terrorist attack by lottery winner Sayfullo Saipov. The program is fraud-ridden, because it has low application standards, and draws from nations that are state sponsors of terror or are known to harbor terrorist organizations. This dangerous combination made the program the subject of numerous congressional oversight hearings and a target for repeal. Please support a repeal of the Visa Lottery.
 
A biometric entry/exit system was a key recommendation of the 9/11 Commission after it learned that several of the hijackers had overstayed their visas. But despite Congressional approval and funding, the last two administrations failed to implement this essential system for tracking and removing visa over-stayers. There is no excuse for further delays in these dangerous times, so I want you to help get this done.

 

Next OFIR meeting - Saturday, Feb. 17 from 2 - 4pm

Alert date: 
2018-01-31
Alert body: 

Oregonians for Immigration Reform will be holding our next meeting Saturday, Feb. 17th,  2pm – 4pm  at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn

We will update you on what's happening with Initiative Petition #22 - to Repeal Oregon's Sanctuary Law.

Lee Vasche  - of Ballot Access LLC  - will explain how his PAID signature gatherers enhance our initiative efforts and increase the likelihood of success.

Primary elections are just around the corner and two candidates will join us toshare their ideas for making Oregon a better place -

Joey Nations – candidate for Congressional Distirct #5 and Marty Heyen – candidate for Oregon House of Representatives – District 22.

Have you signed the petition to Repeal Oregon's Sanctuary Statute?  If not, please go to www.StopOregonSanctuaries.org

Print out a single signer sheet. Simply sign, date and mail – it's that easy!  Or, if you know friends and family members that would like to sign the initiative, you can request a 10 line signature sheets to do so.

So, invite a friend to join you this Saturday, Feb. 17 at 2:00pm at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn – across from Costco in Salem.

We'll see you Saturday!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons: Criminal Alien Report December 2017

The United States having a significant foreign national population residing within the nations boundaries, be they legally or illegally present in the country, unfortunately includes those who commit crimes.

The extent and impact of foreign national crime on the U.S. citizens and residents of this country is explicitly revealed by a simple search on the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) inmates statistics website under the heading of inmate citizenship.

Here are the countries of origin, moreover, the number and percentage of those countries citizens recently incarcerated in the U.S. BOP prison system (The most recent BOP crime numbers available were from December 30, 2017.).

Inmate Citizenship:

- México 23,805 inmates, 13.0 percent;
- Colombia 1,683 inmates, 0.9 percent;
- Dominican Republic 1,443 inmates, 0.8 percent;
- Cuba 1,196 inmates, 0.7 percent;
- Other / unknown countries 9,080 inmates, 4.9 percent;
- United States 145,851 inmates, 79.7 percent;

Total Inmates: 183,058 inmates.

To clarify the meaning of these preceding criminal alien inmate numbers and percentages, I will translate them into words:

Combining December 30th BOP criminal alien inmate numbers, there were 37,207 criminal aliens in the BOP prison system. Alien inmates were 20.3 percent of the federal prison population; more than two in every ten inmates were criminal aliens.

With 23,805 Mexican nationals being incarcerated in the BOP prison system, at 64.0 percent, they were the vast majority of criminal aliens in federal prisons.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons breaks down the federal prison population into 13 types of offenses. One of the top five offenses, the reason inmates are serving time in federal prisons is for immigration crimes. There were 12,246 inmates in the BOP prison system incarcerated for immigration crimes; they were 7.1 percent of the federal prison population.

An urgent wakeup call to all American citizens, eventually the majority of these criminal aliens from México, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Cuba and other countries will be released from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons after completing their prison terms.

The country of Mexico, America’s neighbor to the south, is both historically and literally a land bridge of many frequently unsecured trails, roads, highways and railways used by persons trying and far too often successfully illegally entering our country.

United States citizens should, if they haven’t already, contact their members of the U.S. Congress (two Senators and one Representative) and tell them to support President Donald J. Trump’s commitment to build a wall (fences and technology) along the U.S. border with Mexico to stop the threat of tens of thousands of criminal aliens, once they are released from the federal prison system and deported by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to their countries of origin, ability to illegally return to this nation and harm its citizens and residents.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is an independent crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He is a weekly guest on the Lars Larson northwest radio show. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

Is Oregon's Congressional Delegation a shameful representation of America's values?

Illegal Aliens at SOTU Reveal Amnesty, Not American Interests, is Priority for Many on One Side of the Aisle

by Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) Executive Director Bob Dane

(January 30, 2018, Washington, D.C.) — Dozens of illegal aliens will attend the State of the Union address, invited as distinguished guests by Democrat lawmakers.

“This annual stunt is deeply offensive to Americans who know that the rule of law is the bedrock of our democracy. The United States Capitol is the revered building where those laws are made by the world’s greatest deliberative body; it is not an unruly theatre for flouting lawlessness. By granting VIP access to dozens of illegal aliens who consciously and proudly violate our laws, the Democrat members of Congress who invited them have clearly revealed their contempt for the rule of law as well.

“Those members have also revealed their real agenda; massive amnesty, unlimited immigration and disregard for any reforms that serve the American public’s interest. The message that will be sent by tonight’s presence of so-called ‘Dreamers’ is crystal clear and one-sided: violating our immigration laws is an inconsequential act and the public just needs to get used to it. We’re here, we’re unapologetic, we’re not going anywhere, we’re going to sit and stand anywhere we want – including the United States Capitol – and we demand to be rewarded with citizenship.  

“These tactics only serve to alienate many Americans and set back the debate. Americans have long needed – and have been promised – secure borders, robust interior enforcement, and a reduction in legal immigration levels while moving to a modern, merit-based system. None of it has happened, and tonight’s antics are an infuriating reminder of that, while also confirming who is responsible for the immigration reform stalemate.

“’Dreamers’ should consider whether they are just being used as political props by some Democrats who continue to oppose any and all reasonable immigration proposals. ‘Dreamers’ are certainly not advancing their cause with these defiant tactics that offend many Americans who might otherwise be interested in an earnest bipartisan solution, but only if it offers them what they want too.”
 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Drug Crime Report December 2017

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated that on December 1, 2017 that 97 of the 973 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for drug crimes, 9.97 percent of the criminal alien prison population.

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on December 1st in the state’s prisons for drug crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Drug Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Drug Crimes

December 1, 2017

973

97

9.97%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates incarcerated on December 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for drug crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Drug Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Drug Crimes

Multnomah

33

34.02%

Washington

18

18.56%

Clackamas

14

14.43%

Jackson

7

7.22%

Marion

7

7.22%

Klamath

3

3.09%

Benton

2

2.06%

Lane

2

2.06%

Malheur

2

2.06%

Umatilla

2

2.06%

Wasco

2

2.06%

Deschutes

1

1.03%

Douglas

1

1.03%

Josephine

1

1.03%

Lake

1

1.03%

Polk

1

1.03%

Baker

0

0.00%

Clatsop

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Coos

0

0.00%

Crook

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Gilliam

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Hood River

0

0.00%

Jefferson

0

0.00%

Lincoln

0

0.00%

Linn

0

0.00%

Morrow

0

0.00%

OOS (Not a County)

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Tillamook

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Yamhill

0

0.00%

Total

97

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 97 criminal alien inmates by number and percentage incarcerated on December 1st in the state’s prisons for drug crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Drug Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Drug Crimes

 

Mexico

85

87.63%

 

Honduras

4

4.12%

 

El Salvador

2

2.06%

 

Australia

1

1.03%

 

Italy

1

1.03%

 

Laos

1

1.03%

 

Russia

1

1.03%

 

Unknown Countries

2

2.06%

 

Total

97

100.00%

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Criminal aliens from seven different countries have committed drug crimes against residents in the State of Oregon.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

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