illegal immigration

Oregon health agency's money troubles double in new report

Money problems at the Oregon agency that oversees Medicaid could be more than twice as large as already disclosed, a new report reveals.

Due to errors involving abortion, prison, undocumented immigrants and other factors, the state might have overpaid its contractors or owe other entities as much as $78 million...

....Allen listed $34 million that he said is owed to the agency or went untapped, due to budget and accounting problems....

The disclosures hint at the red meat the reports could serve up to the campaign to overturn $340 million in health taxes enacted to fund the state's Medicaid program....

In his letter to the governor on Friday, Allen laid out problems that ranged from the state paying Medicaid benefits for unauthorized immigrants to incorrectly using federal funds to pay for abortions.

Allen was careful to say that in most cases, staffers are still investigating the problems and the figures and other details will likely change as they learn more. He cited the following problems:

Medicaid for unauthorized immigrants: Oregon incorrectly paid health care organizations it contracted with to care for an undisclosed number of unauthorized immigrants, who were mistakenly listed in the state's computer system as being eligible for more than emergency room care. Allen did not identify the time frame in which the problem occurred, but it caused $25.7 million in "payment errors....

Health officials are still investigating another potential problem related to immigrants in the country illegally. Medicaid covers some emergency care for unauthorized immigrants plus prenatal and delivery care for pregnant women. As health staffers were preparing to implement a new abortion law earlier this year, they discovered the state might have been keeping these mothers on Medicaid after their babies were born, a time when the women were no longer eligible, Allen wrote....

Bariatric surgery payments: Oregon paid more than it should have for these weight loss surgeries from 2009 through 2015, and started trying to recoup the $1.5 million in overpayments a year ago. "As of October 2017, most of the overpayments have still not been repaid by providers, resulting in an accounts receivable balance of $1.1 million," Allen wrote....

Abortion coverage: The state estimates it used $1.8 million or so in federal funds for abortions, which it will have to repay. Federal law generally bans using federal funds to pay for abortions, although there are exceptions for cases of rape, incest and when the pregnant woman's life is in danger, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

>>Money due to drug labelers: Oregon owes an estimated $22.3 million to drug labelers because the state has not passed along some of the money it was supposed to as part of the Medicaid drug rebate program.

Allen also cited problems at his agency and elsewhere with getting money to the right places. They included:

>> State accounting problem: The health authority has received an estimated $20 million from the Division of Child Support to pay for children's health care but has not properly accounted for that money. So state and federal programs were billed for the children's health care.

>>State budget problem: The health agency could gain $14.1 million for nursing facility and post-acute care that was incorrectly sent to the Department of Human Services over the past year.

The health authority might also be able to get federal money for services it has not sought reimbursement for in the past, or for which it claimed less federal funding than it could have, Allen wrote. Examples include services provided to tribal members at non-tribal facilities, and certain preventive services.

Rosario JumpingBull gets a new filling placed by dental assistant Dustie Munsey, right, and Dentist Dr. Jeff Thayer, not pictured. at Deer Ridge Correctional Institution in 2011. Brian Feulner/ The Oregonian(Brian Feulner)

Patrick Allen is director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Border Patrol Agent Killed, Another in Serious Condition in Texas

One Border Patrol agent is dead and his partner left hospitalized in serious condition in the Big Bend Sector of Texas. The FBI is leading the investigation while Border Patrol Special Operations agents and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Air and Marine Operations aircrews are currently searching the area for possible attackers.

Breitbart Texas learned from a trusted CBP official that details on the matter are scarce.

We do know that two Border Patrol agents working as partners in the Van Horn Station area of responsibility of the Big Bend Sector responded to “activity.” Whether the activity was an activated sensor or something else is currently unknown. This occurred on the morning of Sunday, November 19, 2017.

One of the Border Patrol agents later radioed into the communication center saying that he needed assistance and that he was injured. Other Border Patrol agents responded and found one agent injured and unconscious with injuries to his head and body. That agent, Rogelio Martinez, was later pronounced dead. Breitbart has learned that the agent’s family has been notified.

The responding agents also found the partner who had radioed for help. The agents transported the injured agent to the hospital where he is in “serious condition,” according to the official.

Border Patrol agents and Culberson County Sheriff’s Office deputies secured the area.

Border Patrol Agent and President of the National Border Patrol Council (NBPC) Brandon Judd spoke with Breitbart Texas and expressed the council’s deepest condolences to the family of Agent Martinez and to the family of the other agent who is not named at this time. Agent Judd said that this is another example of why the border must be secured. Judd stated, “When all facts come to light on this matter, I believe the public will be outraged as there are those who do not value life who come across our border. Our borders must be secured and criminals must be held accountable.”

Brandon Darby is managing director and editor-in-chief of Breitbart Texas. He co-founded the Cartel Chronicles project with Ildefonso Ortiz and Stephen K. Bannon. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook. He can be contacted at bdarby@breitbart.com.

Ildefonso Ortiz is an award-winning journalist with Breitbart Texas. He co-founded the Cartel Chronicles project with Brandon Darby and Stephen K. Bannon.  You can follow him on Twitter and on Facebook.

 

ICE officers face grave danger in their work

ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) agents are on the front lines of national security in guarding citizens from those immigrants, illegal and legal, who come here to kill, create chaos, and weaken this country, or commit other crimes.

A new bulletin from ICE, excerpted below, describes the human smuggling racket in unforgettable detail, giving photographs.  ICE officers deal with this challenge daily.

Although Pres. Trump promised to improve immigration enforcement drastically, the ICE agents’ union is justifiably disturbed by the slow pace and the continuing influence of hold-over employees and supervisors from the previous Administration who are dragging their feet, undermining enforcement, and making the job of ICE agents unacceptably, unnecessarily dangerous.   See the report by Stephen Dinan of the Washington Times, “ICE agents rebel, say Trump ‘betrayed’ them by retaining Obama’s people.”

Below is an excerpt from the ICE bulletin on human smuggling.  Unfortunately, we don’t learn much about these important issues in the general media.

Human Smuggling Equals Grave Danger, Big Money

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) sent this bulletin at 11/15/2017 01:54 PM EST

Moving human beings as cargo pays in the billions of dollars for transnational criminal smuggling organizations.

Human smuggling is the illegal importation of people into a country via the deliberate evasion of immigration laws. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) serves as the leading U.S. law enforcement agency responsible for the fight against human smuggling.

“They have no concern for humanity, none; it’s a money business,” said Jack Staton, acting special agent in charge for ICE Homeland Security Investigations El Paso, Texas, “they look at people as merchandise, as a way to make money.”

Staton most often encounters individuals crossing from the Juárez, Mexico area, into Texas and New Mexico.

Individuals seeking covert entry into the United States know they need to pay an organization for transport. Smuggling organizations, often associated with other transnational criminal organizations and able to take advantage of people in desperate circumstances, provide that transportation at a significant cost.

Human smuggling on the southwest border of the U.S. is a daily occurrence.

“The Rio Grande Valley is the busiest area for human smuggling activity in the U.S. right now,” said Staton, “from San Diego, California, to Brownsville, Texas, there is activity every day.”

Human smuggling operates as a contract business; an understanding exists among transnational criminal organizations, smugglers and individuals seeking transport that trying to cross the border independently is not an option. Smugglers escort the illegal aliens through the desert, across the border, to stash houses and onto their final destinations within the interior of the U.S. A portion of the smuggling fees paid to the transnational criminal organizations helps fuel their other criminal enterprises.

Endless ways exist in which to smuggle human beings and most of them don’t take into account personal safety or comfort.

Smugglers move humans as part of cargo transports, in vehicles, in boats, in tractor-trailers, in box cars on trains and in automobiles and trucks that are transported on trains as cargo. Smugglers also utilize legitimate transportation options such as commercial buses and flights.

Illicit migrants traveling to the U.S. often pay additional fees for certain types of transportation methods; for example, an individual may pay extra money for transport in a tractor-trailer because the chance of making it across the border is greater than on foot. If the trip takes place in the summer, temperatures can easily rise above 100 degrees in the truck and the situation can quickly become dangerous.

Underestimating the potential danger of human smuggling can have a deadly outcome.

Read the rest of the article here.

Oregon's sanctuary policies set to cost taxpayers $2 million in lost funding

Sanctuary jurisdictions in Oregon currently at risk of losing funding, and amounts at risk:

Multnomah County - $173,088

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission - $2,080,04


DOJ Targets More Sanctuaries

By Jessica Vaughan, Center for Immigration Studies, November 16, 2017

Yesterday DOJ sent a letter to 29 sanctuary jurisdictions that received law enforcement grants under the Byrne/Justice Assistance Grants program in 2016, warning them that they appear to be in violation of federal law and may have to repay the funds. In addition, they could be barred from receiving funds in 2017. Collectively, these jurisdictions received more than $16.7 million last year.

Our sanctuary cities maps are updated to reflect this development.

Under rules imposed in 2016 by previous Attorney General Loretta Lynch at the insistence of House appropriator John Culberson (R-Texas), all applicants for these grants must attest that they are in compliance with all federal laws, especially including 8 USC 1373. That law, passed in 1996, says that no state or local government can have a policy that in any way restricts communication or exchange of information about immigration status between local officials and federal immigration authorities.

Lynch's DOJ initiated an investigation into 10 sanctuaries that received $96.1 million from two DOJ funding programs in 2016. New Attorney General Jeff Sessions continued the process of notifying the jurisdictions, allowing them time to change their policies, and determining if they still qualify for the grants.  …

Rather than change, several of the sanctuaries have filed lawsuits to try to force DOJ to back off. So far, three judges have ruled in favor of the sanctuaries, in northern California, Chicago, and, most recently, Philadelphia. All of the judges found that, despite the sanctuaries' claims that DOJ was overstepping its authority and attempting to illegally coerce them to cooperate, it was permissible for DOJ to withhold funds based on illegal sanctuary policies. Nevertheless, all of the judges found other reasons to block DOJ from actually doing it. For example, the Philadelphia judge decided that Philadelphia was not a sanctuary. As a result of the litigation, DOJ has had to delay disbursing all of the 2017 grants. ...

----------------------------------------

See the list of sanctuary jurisdictions affected and read the full report here.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Sex Crime Report October 2017

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated that on October 2, 2017 that 470 of the 971 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for three types of sex crimes (sex abuse, rape and sodomy), 48.40 percent of the criminal alien prison population.

The following table identifies the types, numbers and percentages of sex crimes committed by the 470 criminal aliens with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers incarcerated on October 2nd in DOC prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers Incarcerated by Type of Sex Crime

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers Incarcerated by Type of Sex Crime

Sex Abuse

197

41.91%

Rape

174

37.02%

Sodomy

99

21.06%

Total

470

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of 470 criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on October 2nd that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for the crimes of sex abuse, rape and sodomy.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Sex Abuse

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Rape

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Sodomy

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

 

Marion

51

50

31

132

28.09%

 

Washington

49

44

22

115

24.47%

 

Multnomah

31

25

17

73

15.53%

 

Clackamas

12

11

4

27

5.74%

 

Lane

7

14

6

27

5.74%

 

Jackson

10

5

4

19

4.04%

 

Yamhill

4

6

3

13

2.77%

 

Deschutes

5

2

3

10

2.13%

 

Linn

6

1

1

8

1.70%

 

Benton

2

4

0

6

1.28%

 

Polk

4

1

1

6

1.28%

 

Malheur

3

2

0

5

1.06%

 

Klamath

4

0

0

4

0.85%

 

Umatilla

1

1

2

4

0.85%

 

Clatsop

2

1

0

3

0.64%

 

Coos

0

2

1

3

0.64%

 

Lincoln

1

1

1

3

0.64%

 

Hood River

0

2

0

2

0.43%

 

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

0.43%

 

Wasco

1

1

0

2

0.43%

 

Crook

0

0

1

1

0.21%

 

Douglas

0

0

1

1

0.21%

 

Josephine

1

0

0

1

0.21%

 

Morrow

1

0

0

1

0.21%

 

Tillamook

0

0

1

1

0.21%

 

Union

1

0

0

1

0.21%

 

Baker

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Columbia

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Curry

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Gilliam

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Grant

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Harney

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Lake

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

OOS

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Sherman

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Wallowa

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Wheeler

0

0

0

0

0.00%

 

Total

197

174

99

470

100.00%

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on October 2nd in the state’s prisons for the crimes of sex abuse, rape and sodomy.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Sex Abuse

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Rape

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Sodomy

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

Mexico

173

142

79

394

83.83%

Guatemala

5

5

1

11

2.34%

El Salvador

1

3

5

9

1.91%

Fed. St. Micron.

3

0

2

5

1.06%

Russia

1

3

1

5

1.06%

Ecuador

0

1

2

3

0.64%

Honduras

1

2

0

3

0.64%

Ukraine

1

1

1

3

0.64%

Vietnam

0

2

1

3

0.64%

Cuba

1

1

0

2

0.43%

England

1

0

1

2

0.43%

Peru

2

0

0

2

0.43%

Philippines

0

0

2

2

0.43%

Wales

0

2

0

2

0.43%

Other Countries

8

12

4

24

5.11%

Total

197

174

99

470

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Criminal aliens from 36 different countries sexually abused, raped and sodomized residents in the state of Oregon.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

Oregon’s Marion County First in Foreign National Crime in October 2017

On October 2, 2017 Oregon’s Marion County had 233 of the 971 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was first in foreign national crime in the state with 24.00 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Marion County residents were harmed or victimized by the 233 criminal aliens incarcerated on October 2nd in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

51

21.89%

Rape

50

21.46%

Sodomy

31

13.30%

Homicide

22

9.44%

Assault

18

7.73%

Kidnapping

10

4.29%

Robbery

9

3.86%

Drugs

8

3.43%

Burglary

7

3.00%

Theft

4

1.72%

Driving Offense

1

0.43%

Vehicle Theft

1

0.43%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

21

9.01%

Total

233

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from October 2nd, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Marion County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

51

25.89%

Rape

174

50

28.74%

Homicide

137

22

16.06%

Drugs

106

8

7.55%

Sodomy

99

31

31.31%

Assault

79

18

22.78%

Robbery

48

9

18.75%

Kidnapping

24

10

41.67%

Burglary

22

7

31.82%

Theft

16

4

25.00%

Driving Offense

8

1

12.50%

Vehicle Theft

4

1

25.00%

Escape

1

0

0.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

56

21

37.50%

Total

971

233

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 233 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Marion Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Marion County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

204

87.55%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.29%

Russia

3

1.29%

Vietnam

3

1.29%

Cambodia

2

0.86%

El Salvador

2

0.86%

Marshall Islands

2

0.86%

Other Countries

14

6.01%

Total

233

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Criminal aliens from 19 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials in Marion County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

Oregon’s Washington County Second in Foreign National Crime in October 2017

On October 2, 2017 Oregon’s Washington County had 206 of the 971 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was Second in foreign national crime in the state with 21.22 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Washington County residents were harmed or victimized by the 206 criminal aliens incarcerated on October 2nd in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

49

23.79%

Rape

44

21.36%

Sodomy

22

10.68%

Drugs

21

10.19%

Homicide

21

10.19%

Assault

20

9.71%

Robbery

11

5.34%

Burglary

5

2.43%

Kidnapping

3

1.46%

Theft

3

1.46%

Driving Offense

2

0.97%

Escape

1

0.49%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Vehicle Theft

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

4

1.94%

Total

206

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from October 2nd, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Washington County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

49

24.87%

Rape

174

44

25.29%

Homicide

137

21

15.33%

Drugs

106

21

19.81%

Sodomy

99

22

22.22%

Assault

79

20

25.32%

Robbery

48

11

22.92%

Kidnapping

24

3

12.50%

Burglary

22

5

22.73%

Theft

16

3

18.75%

Driving Offense

8

2

25.00%

Vehicle Theft

4

0

0.00%

Escape

1

1

100.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination crimes

56

4

7.14%

Total

971

206

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 206 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Washington County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Washington Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Washington County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

158

76.70%

Guatemala

9

4.37%

Cuba

5

2.43%

EL Salvador

4

1.94%

Honduras

4

1.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.46%

Philippines

2

0.97%

Other Countries

21

10.19%

Total

206

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Criminal aliens from 27 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Washington County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials in Washington County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

Absolutely worth the read - and excellent overview of immigration to America

Immigration in the National Interest

October 2017 • Volume 46, Number 10 • Tom Cotton

Tom Cotton
U.S. Senator from Arkansas

Tom Cotton was elected to the U.S. Senate from Arkansas in 2014, following one term in the U.S. House of Representatives. He serves on the Senate Banking Committee, the Senate Intelligence Committee, and the Senate Armed Services Committee. A graduate of Harvard College, he studied government at the Claremont Graduate School and received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2002. In 2005, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, rose to 1st Lieutenant, and served deployments in Iraq with the 101st Airborne and in Afghanistan with a Provincial Reconstruction Team. His military decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Combat Infantry Badge, and Ranger Tab.

The following is adapted from a speech delivered on September 18, 2017, in Washington, D.C., at Hillsdale College’s Eighth Annual Constitution Day Celebration.

Last year, for the first time in our nation’s history, the American people elected as president someone with no high government experience—not a senator, not a congressman, not a governor, not a cabinet secretary, not a general. They did this, I believe, because they’ve lost faith in both the competence and the intentions of our governing class—of both parties! Government now takes nearly half of every dollar we earn and bosses us around in every aspect of life, yet can’t deliver basic services well. Our working class—the “forgotten man,” to use the phrase favored by Ronald Reagan and FDR—has seen its wages stagnate, while the four richest counties in America are inside the Washington Beltway. The kids of the working class are those who chiefly fight our seemingly endless wars and police our streets, only to come in for criticism too often from the very elite who sleep under the blanket of security they provide.

Donald Trump understood these things, though I should add he didn’t cause them. His victory was more effect than cause of our present discontents. The multiplying failures and arrogance of our governing class are what created the conditions for his victory.

Immigration is probably the best example of this. President Trump deviated from Republican orthodoxy on several issues, but immigration was the defining issue in which he broke from the bipartisan conventional wisdom. For years, all Democrats and many Republicans have agreed on the outline of what’s commonly called “comprehensive immigration reform,” which is Washington code for amnesty, mass immigration, and open borders in perpetuity.

This approach was embodied most recently in the so-called Gang of Eight bill in 2013. It passed the Senate, but thankfully we killed it in the House, which I consider among my chief accomplishments in Congress so far. Two members of the Gang of Eight ran for my party’s nomination for president last year. Neither won a single statewide primary. Donald Trump denounced the bill, and he won the nomination.

Likewise, Hillary Clinton campaigned not just for mass immigration, but also on a policy of no deportations of anyone, ever, who is illegally present in our country. She also accused her opponent of racism and xenophobia. Yet Donald Trump beat her by winning states that no Republican had won since the 1980s.

Clearly, immigration was an issue of signal importance in the election. That’s because immigration is more than just another issue. It touches upon fundamental questions of citizenship, community, and identity. For too long, a bipartisan, cosmopolitan elite has dismissed the people’s legitimate concerns about these things and put its own interests above the national interest.

No one captured this sensibility better than President Obama, when he famously called himself “a citizen of the world.”  With that phrase, he revealed a deep misunderstanding of citizenship. After all, “citizen” and “city” share the same Greek root word: citizenship by definition means that you belong to a particular political community. Yet many of our elites share Mr. Obama’s sensibility. They believe that American citizenship—real, actual citizenship—is meaningless, ought not be foreclosed to anyone, and ought not be the basis for distinctions between citizens and foreigners. You might say they think American exceptionalism lies in not making exceptions when it comes to citizenship.

This globalist mindset is not only foreign to most Americans. It’s also foreign to the American political tradition.

Take the Declaration of Independence. Our cosmopolitan elites love to cite its stirring passages about the rights of mankind when they talk about immigration or refugees. They’re not wrong to do so. Unlike any other country, America is an idea—but it is not only an idea. America is a real, particular place with real borders and real, flesh-and-blood people. And the Declaration tells us it was so from the very beginning.

Prior to those stirring passages about “unalienable Rights” and “Nature’s God,” in the Declaration’s very first sentence in fact, the Founders say it has become “necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands” that tie them to another—one people, not all people, not citizens of the world, but actual people who make up actual colonies. The Founders frequently use the words we and us throughout the Declaration to describe that people.

Furthermore, on several occasions, the Declaration speaks of “these Colonies” or “these States.” The Founders were concerned about their own circumstances; they owed a duty to their own people who had sent them as representatives to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia. They weren’t trying to free South America from Spanish or Portuguese dominion, much as they might have opposed that dominion.

Perhaps most notably, the Founders explain towards the end of the Declaration that they had appealed not only to King George for redress, but also to their fellow British citizens, yet those fellow citizens had been “deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity.” Consanguinity!—blood ties! That’s pretty much the opposite of being a citizen of the world.

So while the Declaration is of course a universal document, it’s also a particular document about one nation and one people. Its signers pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor to each other, in English, right here in America—not in Esperanto to mankind in the abstract.

The Constitution affirms this concept of American citizenship. It includes only one reference to immigration, where it empowers Congress to establish a “uniform Rule of Naturalization.” It’s worth pondering a couple points here.

First, what’s that word uniform doing? The Constitution uses the word only three times, when requiring uniform rules for naturalization, bankruptcies, and taxation. These are things that could either knit our Union together or blow it apart—taxation by the central government, the system of credit upon which the free enterprise system depends, and the meaning of citizenship. On these, the Framers insisted upon a uniform, nationwide standard. Diverse habits and laws are suitable for many things in our continental republic, but not for all things. In particular, we can only have “one people” united by a common understanding of citizenship.

Second, the word naturalization implies a process by which foreigners can renounce their former allegiances and become citizens of the United States. They can cast off what accident and force have thrust upon them—race, class, ethnicity—and take on, by reflection and choice, a new title: American. That is a wonderful and beautiful thing, and one of which we are all justly proud. Few Americans love our land so much as the immigrants who’ve escaped the yoke of tyranny.

But our cosmopolitan elites take this to an extreme. They think because anyone can become an American, we’re morally obligated to treat everyone like an American. If you disagree, you’re considered hard-hearted, bigoted, intolerant, xenophobic. So the only policies that aren’t inherently un-American are those that effectively erase our borders and erase the distinction between citizen and foreigner: don’t erect barriers on the border; give sanctuary cities a pass; spare illegal immigrants from deportation; allow American businesses to import as much cheap labor as they want. Anything less, the elites say, is a betrayal of our ideals.

But that’s wrong. Just because you can become an American doesn’t mean you are an American. And it certainly doesn’t mean we must treat you as an American, especially if you don’t play by our rules. After all, in our unique brand of nationalism, which connects our people through our ideas, repudiating our law is kind of like renouncing your blood ties in the monarchical lands of old. And what law is more fundamental to a political community than who gets to become a citizen, under what conditions, and when?

While we wish our fellow man well, it’s only our fellow citizens to whom we have a duty and whose rights our government was created to protect. And among the highest obligations we owe to each other is to ensure that every working American can lead a dignified life. If you look across our history, I’d argue that’s always been the purpose of our immigration system: to create conditions in which normal, hard-working Americans can thrive.

Look no further than what James Madison said on the floor of the House of Representatives in 1790, when the very first Congress was debating our very first naturalization law. He said, “It is no doubt very desirable that we should hold out as many inducements as possible for the worthy part of mankind to come and settle amongst us, and throw their fortunes into a common lot with ours.”  “The worthy part,” not the entire world. Madison continued, “But why is this desirable? Not merely to swell the catalogue of people. No, sir, it is to increase the wealth and strength of the community.”

“To increase the wealth and strength of the community.” That’s quite a contrast to today’s elite consensus. Our immigration system shouldn’t exist to serve the interests of foreigners or wealthy Americans. No, it ought to benefit working Americans and serve the national interest—that’s the purpose of immigration and the theme of the story of American immigration.

When open-borders enthusiasts tell that story, it sounds more like a fairy tale. The way they tell it, America at first was a land that accepted all comers without conditions. But then, periodically, the forces of nativism and bigotry reared their ugly head and placed restrictions on who could immigrate. The forces of darkness triumphed, by this telling, with the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924. But they were defeated with the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which again opened our shores and is still the law governing our immigration system today. Since 1965, everyone has lived happily ever after.

If I were to grade these storytellers, I would give them an F for history and an A for creative writing. The history of immigration in America is not one of ever-growing tides of huddled masses from the Pilgrims to today. On the contrary, throughout our history, American immigration has followed a surge-and-pause pattern. The first big wave was the Irish and German immigrants in the 1840s and 1850s. Then immigration tapered off during the Civil War. The second big wave was the central and southern European immigrants in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. That wave ended with the 1924 Act and the years of lower immigration that followed. And now we’re in the longest wave yet, the surge of immigration from Latin America and East and South Asia, which has followed from the 1965 Act.

In this actual history—not the fairy tale history—the 1924 Act is not an aberration, but an ebb in the regular ebb and flow of immigration to America. After decades of unskilled mass immigration, that law responded by controlling future immigration flows. One result of lower levels of immigration was that it allowed those earlier immigrants to assimilate, learn new skills, and move up the economic ladder, creating the conditions for mass affluence in the post-war era.

Now, there’s no denying that the story of American immigration has its uglier chapters: the Chinese Exclusion Act, the national-origins quota system imposed by the 1924 Act, the indifference to Jews in the 1930s. We ought to remember and learn from this history. One important lesson, though, is this: if the political class had heeded the concerns of working Americans during the second big wave, the 1924 Act would likely have passed earlier and been less restrictionist. The danger lies not in addressing the people’s legitimate, reasonable concerns about immigration, but in ignoring those concerns and slandering the people as bigots.

But then, we shouldn’t be surprised when politicians fail to understand fully the implications of their actions. Take the 1965 Act. That law ended the national-origins quota system, and at the time its importance was minimized. When President Johnson signed it into law, he said, “This bill . . . is not a revolutionary bill. It does not affect the lives of millions. It will not reshape the structure of our daily lives, or really add importantly to either our wealth or our power.”

How wrong he was.

The economy we’re living in today is in no small part a result of the 1965 Act, which opened the door to mass immigration of unskilled and low-skilled workers, primarily through unlimited family chain migration. And that’s not an economy anyone should be satisfied with.

Today, we have about a million immigrants per year. That’s like adding the population of Montana every year—or the population of Arkansas every three years. But only one in 15—one in 15 of those millions of immigrants—comes here for employment-based reasons. The vast majority come here simply because they happen to be related to someone already here. That’s why, for example, we have more Somalia-born residents than Australia-born residents, even though Australia is nearly twice the size of Somalia and Australians are better prepared, as a general matter, to integrate and assimilate into the American way of life.

In sum, over 36 million immigrants, or 94 percent of the total, have come to America over the last 50 years for reasons having nothing to do with employment. And that’s to say nothing of the over 24 million illegal immigrants who have come here. Put them together and you have 60 million immigrants, legal and illegal, who did not come to this country because of a job offer or because of their skills. That’s like adding almost the entire population of the United Kingdom. And this is still leaving aside the millions of temporary guest workers who we import every year into our country.

Unlike many open-border zealots, I don’t believe the law of supply and demand is magically repealed for the labor markets. That means that our immigration system has been depressing wages for people who work with their hands and on their feet. Wages for Americans with high school diplomas are down two percent since the late 1970s. For Americans who didn’t finish high school, they’re down by a staggering 17 percent. Although immigration has a minimal effect overall on the wages of Americans, it has a severe negative effect on low-skilled workers, minorities, and even recent immigrants.

Is automation to blame in part? Sure. Globalized trade? Yes, of course. But there’s no denying that a steady supply of cheap, unskilled labor has hurt working-class wages as well. Among those three factors, immigration policy is the one that we can control most easily for the benefit of American workers. Yet we’ve done the opposite.

I know the response of open-border enthusiasts: they plead that we need a steady supply of cheap unskilled labor because there are “jobs that no American will do.” But that just isn’t so. There is no job Americans won’t do. In fact, there’s no industry in America in which the majority of workers are not natural-born Americans—not landscapers, not construction workers, not ski instructors, not lifeguards, not resort workers, not childcare workers—not a single job that over-educated elites associate with immigrants. The simple fact is, if the wage is decent and the employer obeys the law, Americans will do any job. And for tough, dangerous, and physically demanding jobs, maybe working folks do deserve a bit of a raise.

“No American will do that job.” Let me just pause for a moment and confess how much I detest that sentiment. In addition to being ignorant of the economic facts, it’s insulting, condescending, and demeaning to our countrymen. Millions of Americans make our hotel beds and build our houses and clean our offices; imagine how they feel when they hear some pampered elite say no American will do their job. And finally, I must say, that sentiment also carries more than a whiff of the very prejudice of which they accuse those concerned about the effects of mass immigration.

But the harmful impact on blue-collar workers isn’t the only problem with the current system. Because we give two-thirds of our green cards to relatives of people here, there are huge backlogs in the system. This forces highly talented immigrants to wait in line for years behind applicants whose only claim to naturalization is a random family connection to someone who happened to get here years ago. We therefore lose out on the very best talent coming into our country—the ultra-high-skilled immigrants who can come to America, stand on their own two feet, pay taxes, and through their entrepreneurial spirit and innovation create more and higher-paying jobs for our citizens.

To put it simply, we have an immigration system that is badly failing Madison’s test of increasing the wealth and strength of the community. It might work to the advantage of a favored few, but not for the common good, and especially not the good of working-class Americans.

This is why I’ve introduced legislation to fix our naturalization system. It’s called the RAISE Act: Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy.

The RAISE Act will correct the flaws in the 1965 Act by reorienting our immigration system towards foreigners who have the most to contribute to our country. It would create a skills-based points system similar to Canada’s and Australia’s. Here’s how it would work. When people apply to immigrate, they’d be given an easy-to-calculate score, on a scale of 0 to 100, based on their education, age, job salary, investment ability, English-language skills, and any extraordinary achievements. Then, twice a year, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services would invite the top scorers to complete their applications, and it would invite enough high-scoring applicants to fill the current 140,000 annual employment-based green-card slots.

We’d still admit spouses and unmarried minor children of citizens and legal permanent residents. But we’d end the preferences for most extended and adult family members—no more unlimited chain migration. We’d also eliminate the so-called diversity visa lottery, which hands out green cards randomly without regard to skills or family connections, and which is plagued by fraud. We’d remove per-country caps on immigration, too, so that high-skilled applicants aren’t shut out of the process simply because of their country of origin. And finally, we’d cap the number of refugees offered permanent residency to 50,000 per year, in line with the recent average for the Bush era and most of the Obama era—and still quite generous.

Add it all up and our annual immigrant pool would be younger, higher-skilled, and ready to contribute to our economy without using welfare, as more than half of immigrant households do today. No longer would we distribute green cards essentially based on random chance. Nor would we import millions of unskilled workers to take jobs from blue-collar Americans and undercut their wages. And over a ten-year period, our annual immigration levels would decrease by half, gradually returning to historical norms.

Given current events, this legislation is timelier than ever. Earlier this month, President Trump announced that he would wind down, over six months, the unconstitutional Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. President Obama abused his authority with DACA—which purported to give legal status to illegal immigrants who arrived here as children and who are now in their twenties and thirties—because, as we’ve seen, the Constitution reserves to Congress the power to make uniform laws of naturalization.

Because of President Obama’s unlawful action, about 700,000 people are now in a kind of legal limbo. President Trump did the right thing as a matter of law by ending DACA, though as a matter of policy he’d prefer its beneficiaries don’t face deportation. Democrats agree, as do a lot of Republicans. So the question isn’t so much about deportation, but rather if and what kind of compromise Congress can strike.

Here’s where the RAISE Act comes in. We can, if we choose, grant citizenship to those illegal immigrants who came here through no fault of their own as kids and who’ve otherwise been law-abiding, productive citizens. But if we do, it will have the effect of legalizing through chain migration their parents—the very people who created the problem by bringing the kids here illegally. Some like to say that children shouldn’t pay for the crimes of the parents, but surely parents can pay for the crimes of the parents. And that’s to say nothing of their siblings and spouses, and then all the second- and third-order chain migration those people create. So simply codifying DACA without ending chain migration would rapidly accelerate the wave of unskilled immigrant labor that’s been depressing the wages of working Americans.

An obvious compromise, then, is to pair any attempt to codify DACA with reform of the green card system to protect American workers. A stand-alone amnesty will not do. Nor will an amnesty with vague promises of “border security,” which never seem to materialize or get funded once the pressure is off Congress. But if we codify DACA along with the reforms in the RAISE Act, we will protect working Americans from the worst consequences of President Obama’s irresponsible decision.

President Trump has said that chain migration must be ended in any legislative compromise, and he’s highlighted the RAISE Act as a good starting point for those negotiations. I support that approach, and I’m committed to working with my colleagues, Democrats and Republicans alike, on a deal that protects American workers and strengthens our community.

Immigration has emerged in recent years as a kind of acid test for our leaders—a test they’ve mostly failed. Our cosmopolitan elite—in both parties—has pursued a radical immigration policy that’s inconsistent with our history and our political tradition. They’ve celebrated the American idea, yet undermined the actual American people of the here and now. They’ve forgotten that the Declaration speaks of “one people” and the Constitution of “We the People.” At the same time, they’ve enriched themselves and improved their quality of life, while creating a new class of forgotten men.

There’s probably no issue that calls more for an “America first” approach than immigration. After all, the guidepost of our immigration policy should be putting Americans first—not foreigners and not a tiny elite. Our immigration policy should serve the “wealth and strength” of our people, as Madison said in that first Congress. It should not divide our nation, impoverish our workers, or promote hyphenated Americanism.

Citizenship is the most cherished thing our nation can bestow. Our governing class ought to treat it as something special. We ought to put the interests of our citizens first and welcome those foreigners best prepared to handle the duties of citizenship and contribute positively to our country. When we do, our fellow Americans will begin to trust us once again.

OFIR Membership Meeting Sat. Nov. 18th at 2:00pm

Alert date: 
2017-11-11
Alert body: 

You're invited to attend OFIR's upcoming membership meeting Saturday, Nov. 18th at 2:00pm.

OFIR will provide an update of our progress on Initiative Petition #22 and our efforts to Repeal Oregon's Sanctuary Law.

The NEW signature sheets that include our certified ballot title will be available for those that want to gather signatures of friends, family, neighbors or, who plan to attend an event or particular location to gather signatures.

We'll share many great tips and ideas for successful signature gathering, too.

While the election is a year away, candidates are interested in meeting you and sharing their plans for Oregon with you.  We'll see who stops by to say hello.

We will meet from 2:00 - 4:00pm at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn across from Costco, in Salem.

If you have any questions, please call the OFIR line at 503.435.0141.

Invite a friend to join you!  See you Saturday!

Oregon’s Multnomah County Third in Foreign National Crime in October 2017

 

On October 1, 2017 Oregon’s Multnomah County had 199 of the 971 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was third in foreign national crime in the state with 20.49 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Multnomah County residents were harmed or victimized by the 199 criminal aliens incarcerated on October 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Homicide

39

19.60%

Drugs

34

17.09%

Sex Abuse

31

15.58%

Rape

25

12.56%

Robbery

20

10.05%

Assault

18

9.05%

Sodomy

17

8.54%

Kidnapping

6

3.02%

Burglary

4

2.01%

Driving Offense

2

1.01%

Vehicle Theft

1

0.50%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Theft

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

2

1.01%

Total

199

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 October 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from October 1st, the total number criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Multnomah County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Multnomah County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

31

15.74%

Rape

174

25

14.37%

Homicide

137

39

28.47%

Drugs

106

34

32.08%

Sodomy

99

17

17.17%

Assault

79

18

22.78%

Robbery

48

20

41.67%

Kidnapping

24

6

25.00%

Burglary

22

4

18.18%

Theft

16

0

0.00%

Driving Offense

8

2

25.00%

Vehicle Theft

4

1

25.00%

Escape

1

0

0.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

56

2

3.57%

Total

971

199

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 October 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 199 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Multnomah County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Multnomah Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Multnomah County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

133

66.83%

Vietnam

10

5.03%

Cuba

8

4.02%

Honduras

5

2.51%

Russia

5

2.51%

Guatemala

4

2.01%

Ukraine

4

2.01%

Egypt

2

1.01%

EL Salvador

2

1.01%

England

2

1.01%

Federated States of Micronesia

2

1.01%

Somalia

2

1.01%

Other Countries

20

10.05%

Total

199

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 October 17.

Criminal aliens from 32 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Multnomah County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials in Multnomah County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

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