cost

Oregon’s Washington County Second in Foreign National Crime in January 2019

On January 1, 2019 Oregon’s Washington County had 192 of the 909 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was second in foreign national crime in the state with 21.12 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Washington County residents were harmed or victimized by the 192 criminal aliens incarcerated on January 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ICE detainers.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Rape

45

23.44%

Sex Abuse

44

22.92%

Homicide

21

10.94%

Sodomy

21

10.94%

Assault

19

9.90%

Drugs

14

7.29%

Robbery

11

5.73%

Burglary

9

4.69%

Theft

3

1.56%

Kidnapping

2

1.04%

Driving Offense

1

0.52%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Vehicle Theft

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

2

1.04%

Total

192

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from January 1st, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Washington County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Washington County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

189

44

23.28%

Rape

169

45

26.63%

Homicide

131

21

16.03%

Sodomy

99

21

21.21%

Drugs

77

14

18.18%

Assault

75

19

25.33%

Robbery

46

11

23.91%

Kidnapping

27

2

7.41%

Burglary

23

9

39.13%

Theft

14

3

21.43%

Vehicle Theft

4

0

0.00%

Driving Offense

3

1

33.33%

Arson

1

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

51

2

3.92%

Total

909

192

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Criminal aliens from 25 identified countries have harmed or victimized Washington County residents.

Foreign nationals who declared their country or origin as being Mexico were 148 of 192 criminal aliens from Washington County incarcerated in the DOC prison system — 77.08 percent of the county’s alien inmates in the state’s prisons.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 192 criminal aliens with ICE detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Washington County in the DOC prison system.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Washington County by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Washington County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

148

77.08%

Guatemala

10

5.21%

EL Salvador

5

2.60%

Cuba

3

1.56%

Honduras

3

1.56%

Ukraine

2

1.04%

Vietnam

2

1.04%

Other Countries

19

9.90%

Total

192

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

USBP Agents Arrest Previously Removed Rapist

TUCSON, Ariz. – Tucson Sector Border Patrol Agents apprehended a previously deported Mexican national with a violent criminal history after he entered the U.S. illegally Thursday morning east of Nogales.

During processing, agents conducting a records check on 38-year-old Juan Maldonado-Martinez discovered his Oregon convictions for rape in the third degree in 2003 and forgery in the first degree in 2004.

Maldonado will remain in federal custody to face felony immigration prosecution.

All persons apprehended by the Border Patrol undergo criminal history checks using biometrics to ensure illegal aliens with criminal histories are positively identified.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Mexican National Crime Report January 2019

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on January 1, 2019 that 726 of the 909 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were Mexican nationals — 79.87 percent of the criminal alien prison population (Note: The number of Mexican nationals incarcerated in DOC prisons does not necessarily equal the number of Oregon residents victimized by this specific group of criminal aliens).

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on January 1st in the state’s prisons who declared themselves as being Mexican nationals.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

January 1, 2019

909

726

79.87%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Mexican (MEX) national criminals were sent to DOC prisons from 27 of 36 Oregon counties —75.00 percent of the counties in the state.

Seven Oregon counties, Marion (192 MEX inmates), Washington (148 MEX inmates), Multnomah (114 MEX inmates), Clackamas (63 MEX inmates), Lane (33 MEX inmates), Jackson (28 MEX inmates) and Umatilla (24 MEX inmates) had 602 of the 726 Mexican national inmates incarcerated in DOC prisons — 82.92 percent of the MEX inmates.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on January 1st that were sent  to prison from the state’s 36 counties.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ICE Detainers

Marion

192

26.45%

Washington

148

20.39%

Multnomah

114

15.70%

Clackamas

63

8.68%

Lane

33

4.55%

Jackson

28

3.86%

Umatilla

24

3.31%

Yamhill

19

2.62%

Linn

16

2.20%

Polk

12

1.65%

Deschutes

11

1.52%

Benton

10

1.38%

Klamath

10

1.38%

Malheur

9

1.24%

Jefferson

6

0.83%

Wasco

5

0.69%

Douglas

4

0.55%

Lincoln

4

0.55%

Tillamook

4

0.55%

Clatsop

3

0.41%

Coos

3

0.41%

Hood River

2

0.28%

Josephine

2

0.28%

Crook

1

0.14%

Gilliam

1

0.14%

Lake

1

0.14%

Morrow

1

0.14%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

726

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 726 Mexican national criminals.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on January 1st by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

166

22.87%

Rape

137

18.87%

Homicide

101

13.91%

Sodomy

78

10.74%

Drugs

72

9.92%

Assault

54

7.74%

Robbery

30

4.13%

Kidnapping

18

2.48%

Burglary

13

1.79%

Theft

5

0.69%

Driving Offense

3

0.41%

Vehicle Theft

2

0.28%

Arson

1

0.14%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

46

6.34%

Total

726

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from January 1st, the following table reveals the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated by type of crime, the number of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Number of Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

189

166

87.83%

Rape

169

137

81.07%

Homicide

131

101

77.10%

Sodomy

99

78

78.79%

Drugs

77

72

93.51%

Assault

75

54

72.00%

Robbery

46

30

65.22%

Kidnapping

27

18

66.67%

Burglary

23

13

56.52%

Theft

14

5

35.71%

Vehicle Theft

4

2

50.00%

Driving Offense

3

3

100.00%

Arson

1

1

100.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

51

46

90.20%

Total

909

726

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Beyond the DOC Mexican national incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per type of crime, criminal aliens from Mexico place a substantial economic burden on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($108.26) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for 726 Mexican national inmates is approximately ($78,596.76) per day, ($550,177.32) per week, and ($28,687,817.40) per year.

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 726 Mexican national inmates includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography:

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated January 1, 2019.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, February 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Sex Crime Report January 2019

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on January 1, 2019 that 457 of 909 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for three types of sex crimes — sex abuse, rape and sodomy — 50.28 percent of the criminal alien prison population (Note: The number of criminal aliens incarcerated for sex crimes in DOC prisons does not necessarily equal the number of Oregon residents victimized by alien sex abuse, rape and sodomy.).

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table is a numerical breakdown by number and percentage of the 457 criminal alien inmates incarcerated on January 1st in the state’s prisons for the crimes of sex abuse, rape and sodomy.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers Incarcerated by Type of Sex Crime

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers Incarcerated by Type of Sex Crime

Sex Abuse

189

41.36%

Rape

169

36.98%

Sodomy

99

21.66%

Total

457

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons committed at least one sex crime in 26 of 36 Oregon counties —72.22 percent of the counties in the state.

Seven Oregon counties, Marion (128 alien sex offenders), Washington (110 alien sex offenders), Multnomah (73 alien sex offenders), Lane (27 alien sex offenders), Clackamas (23 alien sex offenders), Jackson (18 alien sex offenders) and Yamhill (13 alien sex offenders) had 392 of 457 criminal alien inmates incarcerated in DOC prisons for sex crimes — 85.78 percent of the alien sex offenders incarcerated in the state’s prisons.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table indicates the location by county of where the 457 criminal alien inmates were sent to serve time in the state’s prison system for sex crimes; furthermore, the table is a numerical breakdown by county of the type of sex crimes alien inmates committed that got them sent to the state’s prison system; finally, the table gives the total number and percentage of alien inmates by county incarcerated for sex crimes in the state’s prison system.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Sex Abuse

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Rape

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for the Crime of Sodomy

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

Marion

47

49

32

128

28.01%

Washington

44

45

21

110

24.07%

Multnomah

33

24

16

73

15.97%

Lane

8

13

6

27

5.91%

Clackamas

9

9

5

23

5.03%

Jackson

10

4

4

18

3.94%

Yamhill

3

6

4

13

2.84%

Deschutes

4

2

3

9

1.97%

Linn

7

1

1

9

1.97%

Benton

1

4

1

6

1.31%

Umatilla

3

1

2

6

1.31%

Malheur

3

2

0

5

1.09%

Polk

3

1

1

5

1.09%

Clatsop

2

1

0

3

0.66%

Coos

0

2

1

3

0.66%

Klamath

3

0

0

3

0.66%

Lincoln

2

1

0

3

0.66%

Jefferson

1

1

0

2

0.44%

Josephine

2

0

0

2

0.44%

Morrow

1

1

0

2

0.44%

Wasco

1

1

0

2

0.44%

Crook

0

0

1

1

0.22%

Douglas

0

0

1

1

0.22%

Hood River

0

1

0

1

0.22%

Tillamook

1

0

0

1

0.22%

Union

1

0

0

1

0.22%

Baker

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Gilliam

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Lake

0

0

0

0

0.00%

OOS

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Total

189

169

99

457

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Criminal aliens from 37 identified countries were incarcerated in DOC prisons for sex crimes in the State of Oregon.

Foreign nationals who declared their country or origin as being Mexico were 381 of 457 criminal alien inmates incarcerated for sex crimes in the DOC prison system — 83.37 percent of the alien sex offenders in the state’s prisons.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table indicates the self-declared countries of origin of the 457 criminal alien inmates that were sent to serve time in the state’s prison system for sex crimes; furthermore, the table is a numerical breakdown by country of the type of sex crimes alien inmates committed that got them sent to the state’s prison system; finally, the table gives the total number and percentage of alien inmates by country incarcerated for sex crimes in the state’s prison system.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Sex Abuse

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Rape

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for the Crime of Sodomy

DOC Number Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

DOC Percent Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Sex Crimes

Mexico

166

137

78

381

83.37%

Guatemala

5

6

2

13

2.84%

El Salvador

1

2

5

8

1.75%

Russia

0

3

1

4

0.88%

Vietnam

0

3

1

4

0.88%

Ecuador

0

1

2

3

0.66%

Honduras

1

2

0

3

0.66%

Cuba

1

1

0

2

0.44%

England

1

0

1

2

0.44%

Fed. St. Micron.

1

0

1

2

0.44%

Laos

0

1

1

2

0.44%

Peru

2

0

0

2

0.44%

Philippines

0

0

2

2

0.44%

Sierra Leone

2

0

0

2

0.44%

Ukraine

0

1

1

2

0.44%

Wales

0

2

0

2

0.44%

Other Countries

9

10

4

23

5.03%

Total

189

169

99

457

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

Washington Post: Farm Industry Is Being Forced to Replace Illegal Workforce

Excerpts:

The paper [Washington Post] reported February 21:

... With the election of Trump, employers said they knew that finding undocumented workers would probably become even more difficult. One Washington state farmer said he watched as his entire pool of undocumented workers crossed the border into Canada after Trump’s inauguration, fearing deportation. Another farmer, failing to find domestic workers in 2017, formed a partnership with a local prison, hiring detainees to work the fields as part of a voluntary work program.

Farm companies are importing more temporary visa workers via the H-2A program. In 2016, farm companies hired 165,000 temporary workers via the H2A program. In 2018, the number rose to 242,000 H-2A workers, who are expected to return home after 10 months of work.

Apple farms in Oregon are also looking to machines to curb their reliance on migrants to pick the most profitable fruit:  [photo]

The two articles in the Washington Post are notable because they recognize the impact of cheap-labor migration on U.S. technology and economics.

Most articles by establishment media outlets focus on the demands of U.S. employers and of foreign migrants and ignore the deeply damaging impact illegal and legal migration on Americans’ wages, salaries, productivity, and technological development.

For example, many major U.S. companies ally with foreign outsourcing firms to keep at least 1.5 million foreign college-graduates — including at least 650,000 H-1B workers — in the jobs sought by U.S. college graduates. That business strategy is made possible by government labor policy, and it spikes Wall Street values, shrinks salaries, and steers middle-class Americans away from technology jobs.

Overall, the U.S. agriculture industry is heavily mechanized and automated. High-tech machinery allows farmers and a few workers to plant, help, and harvest vast acreages of row crops, such as wheat, corn, potatoes, carrots, and soybeans. The huge harvests feed Americans and many people abroad.

The U.S. dairy industry is partly automated but lags behind European dairy farms who have shrunk their labor costs by buying cow-milking robots. Dairy farmers are lobbying to be allowed into the H-2A program and complain that government-set milk prices are too low for them to afford the cow-milking robots.

But there is little automation in the business of picking fruit, such as peaches, apples, and strawberries. Cheap illegal labor has allowed farm companies to ignore technology, but that strategy has run into a ditch.

Farms in Mexico and South America are using their expert managers, extra sunshine, and cheaper labor to deliver more food to their countries and to export more food to the U.S., so cutting into U.S. farmers’ share of the U.S. market.

That international competition is also forcing American farms to consider automating their harvests.

The asparagus industry shows the connection between labor costs and automation.

In California and Idaho, asparagus is picked by migrants carrying a long tool. In Michigan, where there are fewer migrants, farms use buggies to help a team of several migrants pick the crop faster. In Europe, where migrants are expensive, companies are trying to use bigger machines that can pick the asparagus crop with few workers.

SCAAP Data Suggest Illegal Aliens Commit Crime at a Much Higher Rate Than Citizens and Lawful Immigrants

Excerpts:

This report examines the rate at which illegal aliens are incarcerated in state and local correctional facilities after being convicted of a crime. To determine that rate:

  • We analyzed incarceration data from the federal government’s State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) and compared it to the public records of state and local prisons.[5]
  • Via SCAAP, state entities apply to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to obtain reimbursement for the costs associated with incarcerating illegal aliens.
  • Accordingly, the rate at which a state seeks reimbursement provides a good snapshot of the number of illegal aliens in its criminal justice system.
  • In order to estimate how many illegal aliens are currently incarcerated in a given state, we relied on data from the most recent SCAAP report published by the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA).[6]
  • Our other calculations are based on commonly available state corrections/criminal justice reports and other non-SCAPP federal data.

...

SCAAP data indicate that illegal aliens are typically at least three times as likely to be incarcerated than citizens and lawfully-present aliens.

...

Other critics assert that any claims that illegal aliens commit crimes at a higher rate than lawfully-present immigrants or U.S. citizens are motivated solely by racism inherent in American law enforcement. However, data on conviction rates and plea bargains generally indicate that the correlation between arrest and subsequent conviction in the United States is high. Conviction rates in state jurisdictions vary but are typically over 50 percent. For example, 84 percent in Texas, 82 percent in California and 67 percent in New York.[23] Accordingly, courts appear to be regularly finding that police and prosecutors have sustained their burden in proving that charged illegal aliens have actually committed the crimes of which they are accused. There does not appear to be any indication that illegal alien incarceration rates are being artificially inflated by overly aggressive enforcement activity.

Migrant Caravans Prove a Successful Formula for Mass Illegal Entry to US

Portillo, 38, said she joined the migrant caravan after hearing about it on social media. She brought her 6-year-old daughter from Honduras.

"I was coming with the original caravan that was going to Tijuana, but the first people that arrived in Tijuana were causing trouble, so I decided to sidetrack and not continue on with the group," Portillo said on Feb. 15, through a translator.  "When this other caravan started coming over here, I joined it."
 
She arrived in Piedras Negras, Mexico, on Feb. 4 with 1,800 other mostly Central American migrants, and has been staying in an old factory. Mexican officials say the de facto migrant camp will be cleared out by Feb. 21.
 
Portillo said that while she was in Tapachula, Mexico, the United Nations gave her 3,700 pesos (US $193) for her daughter, to help with food and other necessities.
 
As with many other migrants, Portillo had been told she could easily walk into the United States and claim asylum. However, in reality, it's not quite so simple, as she discovered when she arrived at the old factory after being transported in buses and trucks most of the way.
 
Mexican authorities issued Portillo and her daughter humanitarian visitor visas that are good until July 2020. But she wants to cross to the United States and apply for asylum as soon as possible.
 
Dispersing the Caravan
 
Over the past week, the caravan of mostly Central Americans has been broken into smaller groups and bused to other border cities in Mexico, including Juarez, Acuata, Reynosa, and Matamoros. On the U.S. side of those cities are El Paso, Del Rio, McAllen, and Brownsville.
 
Piedras Negras Mayor Claudio Bres told Mexican media that about 500 of the migrants have had their legal stay in Mexico rejected and now have 30 days to leave the country. Many others were granted a one-year humanitarian visa to live and work.
 
At least 100 criminals were identified among the migrants and subsequently deported, according to Secretary of Public Security of Coahuila José Luis Pliego Corona.
 
About 25 MS-13 gang members who travelled with the caravan also have been deported, according to Coahuila Gov. Miguel Riquelme.
 
"We had around 10 gang members identified. Today, there are around 25 identified, who have been deported by [our] joint efforts with the Mexican government," Riquelme told Mexican media on Feb. 18.
 
President Donald Trump signed a national emergency declaration on Feb. 15, saying the southern border is in crisis. The administration has identified $6.1 billion in the defense budget and $600 million from the Treasury Department to reappropriate toward building more fencing along the border.
 
"If you're going to have drugs pouring across the border, if you're going to have human traffickers pouring across the border in areas where we have no protection, in areas where we don't have a barrier, then it's very hard to make America great again," Trump said on Feb. 15.
 
Marvin Ruiz, 26, said he's fleeing the MS-13 gang, whose members tried to recruit him in Honduras. He said he heard about the caravan on social media and left his wife and child to join it.
 
"My wife and child are in danger now, but I didn't have the finances to bring them," he said.
 
Ruiz has a visitor visa for Mexico that expires in February 2020, but his goal is to get into the United States.
 
"Yes, I will cross river illegally. At the right time, I will go across," he said. He said he has a relative in Georgia.
 
Araceli Davila, 42, traveled from El Salvador with her two children, aged 24 and 14. She also heard about the caravan through social media. She only has a 45-day temporary permit, which expires on Feb. 23. Davila said she applied for a humanitarian visitor visa when in Tapachula, but left with the caravan before she received it.
 
"My brother lives in North Carolina, and I want to go there and work," she said.
 
Illegal Crossings Spike
 
Even running at 150-percent capacity, Customs and Border Protection in Eagle Pass, Texas, can only handle around 20 asylum claims per day.
 
Consequently, illegal crossings into the United States have surged in the area, and Border Patrol has been busy rescuing migrants who attempt to cross the deceptively swift and deep Rio Grande.
 
Many small groups cross easily from Mexico onto one of several small islands in the river under the international bridges; but the second part of the crossing is highly risky.
 
On Feb. 18, border agents saved a 12-year-old Honduran boy's life after hauling him unconscious from the Rio Grande, as he tried to cross with his brother and a Nicaraguan man. Agents pulled the boy's limp body onto their boat and resuscitated him with CPR, according to Customs and Border Protection.
 
"This incident highlights the dangers of attempting to enter the United States illegally," said Del Rio Sector acting Chief Patrol Agent Matthew Hudak. "If not for the training and quick response by our marine agents, this young boy would have lost his life."
 
On the same day, Border Patrol agents arrested a 35-year-old Honduran who crossed illegally into the United States. The man was a confirmed member of the MS-13 gang who had previously been deported in 2006.
 
"Violent criminals continue to illegally cross the border and attempt to enter the United States," Hudak said.  "Our agents remain vigilant to prevent these types of criminals from entering and harming our communities."
 
The Epoch Times watched several groups attempt to cross the river on Feb. 16, with most getting into distress and having to be rescued, while some retreated to Mexico.
 
Border Patrol agents joked that their boat is called "the ferry"—as they basically ferry illegal crosserrs to the United States.
 
Border Patrol apprehended almost 400,000 illegal border crossers in fiscal year 2018. The volume this fiscal year is on target to hit 600,000. Border Patrol agents have encountered 58 groups of 100 or more people so far this fiscal year, compared to 13 total in fiscal 2018.
 
On Feb. 19 Mexican media reported violence on the country's southern border, as a group of at least 600 migrants from Central America forced its way over the border, throwing rocks at police.
 
Caravan Rumors
 
Rumors and folklore are rife in the migrant caravans and this one was no exception. When asked who was organizing it, several people mentioned a Honduran man named Carlos, an unnamed Mexican man, and a lawyer.
 
Portillo said a Mexican man joined the caravan as it passed through Oaxaca, Mexico, and took over the organization, escorting it all the way to Piedras Negras. She said the migrants were told to do what the man said, and that he was getting paid a lot of money to make sure they got to the U.S. border. Portillo couldn't provide the man's name, but said he had already gone back to get another caravan organized.
 
Ruiz said the lawyer was advising them on what to say, what to watch out for, and what to expect when entering the United States.
 
San Diego-based open borders group Pueblos Sin Fronteras ("People Without Borders") has been involved in assisting previous caravans, but there were no verifiable ties to this one. The group provided major assistance to last year's caravan that ended up in Tijuana, Mexico.
 
Another group, Los Angeles-based Al Otro Lado ("To the other side") was also in the Tijuana migrant camp advising migrants on the asylum process and how to deal with certain questions.
 
"It's important to be eligible for asylum," the organization's litigation director, Erika Pinheiro, said over a loudspeaker at the migrant camp at the Benito Juarez sports complex on Nov. 19.
 
"[Withholding of removal] is not a road towards residency and citizenship. That is, you'll only have a work permit; you'll never be able to leave the United States; you can't apply for your family members; you can't vote in the United States. Basically, you won't be deported but it doesn't have many benefits."
 
Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen traveled to El Salvador on Feb. 20 to meet with her counterparts from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador to discuss migration and security issues in the region.
 
The meeting is part of a campaign to step up cooperation in the region to bolster border security, target human-smuggling and trafficking organizations, prevent the formation of new migrant caravans, and address the root causes of the migration crisis, according to a Homeland Security statement.
 
The Trump administration announced a $10.6 billion foreign aid package for southern Mexico and Central America on Dec. 18.
 
The administration is also expanding the scope of the Alliance for Prosperity plan that began at the end of 2014. It was started by Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador and has been supported each year since by a U.S. congressional allocation of $460 million to $750 million.
 
The plan was based on a similar one in Colombia that helped to dismantle drug cartels, increase security, and foster economic activity.
 
About half of Central America's population located in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras—lives in poveerty, according to State Department estimates.
 
In 2015, El Salvador and Honduras had the highest global rates of intentional homicides, respectively, according to data from the United Nations. And although the homicide rates in both countries dramatically declined in 2017, according to State Department data, they still exceed those of most countries in the region.
 
However, the migration flow is primarily driven by economic concerns and lack of economic opportunity, and poverty and localized violence aren't grounds for asylum under United States and international law.
 
Asylum-seekers need to prove that they have suffered past persecution or have a well-founded fear of future persecution in their home country because of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group.
 
But persecution is generally considered state-sanctioned or -condoned, which means the government of the alien's home country is the sponsor of the persecution. For example, in North Korea, the regime itself persecutes Christians

U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons: Criminal Alien Report January 2019

The United States having a significant foreign national population residing within the nations boundaries, be they legally or illegally present in the country, unfortunately includes those who commit crimes.

The extent and impact of foreign national crime on the U.S. citizens and residents of this country is clearly revealed by a simple search on the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) inmates statistics website under the heading of inmate citizenship.

Here are the countries of origin, moreover, the number and percentage of those countries citizens recently incarcerated in the U.S. BOP prison system (Note: The most recent BOP crime numbers available were from January 26, 2019.).

Inmate Citizenship:

- México 21,691 inmates, 12.1 percent;
- Colombia 1,648 inmates, 0.9 percent;
- Dominican Republic 1,443 inmates, 0.8 percent;
- Cuba 1,192 inmates, 0.7 percent;
- Other / unknown countries 8,804 inmates, 4.9 percent;
- United States 145,133 inmates, 80.7 percent;

Total Inmates: 179,911 inmates.

To explain the meaning of these preceding criminal alien inmate numbers and percentages, I will translate them into words:

Combining January 26th BOP criminal alien inmate numbers, there were 34,778 criminal aliens in the BOP prison system. Alien inmates were 19.3 percent of the federal prison population.

With 21,691 Mexican nationals being incarcerated in the BOP prison system, at 62.4 percent, they were the vast majority of criminal aliens in federal prisons.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons breaks down the federal prison population into 13 types of offenses. One of the top five offenses, the reason inmates are serving time in federal prisons is for immigration crimes. There were 10,778 inmates in the BOP prison system incarcerated for immigration crimes; they were 6.4 percent of the federal prison population.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to federal, state, county and city elected and non elected governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the United States of America. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

Enthusiasm is contagious!

OFIR hosted their first membership meeting of the New Year on Saturday, Feb. 16.

How amazing, that even after the disappointing defeat of Measure 105, folks were full of enthusiasm and energy to move forward.

What a great group of folks - we look forward to what 2019 will bring!  If you are interested in making a difference, please join us as we work to save our state and our country from unfettered illegal immigration and excessive legal imigration.

Sign up for our OFIR email alerts and plan to attend our next meeting Saturday, May 11, 2019 - get involved and learn how you can make a difference!
 

Swamp Swallows Trump

By Joe Guzzardi

President Trump wants more people to come to the United States! With my own two ears, I heard the President say on back-to-back days that he wants historically high immigration levels, and more people that he foolishly claims “we need.”

Since President Trump was referring to more legal immigration, one could be forgiven for thinking that he had never heard of chain migration where eventually one legal immigrant petitions an average of 3.5 family members to come to the U.S. But analysts who follow and study the nation’s suicidal immigration laws and their loopholes know that President Trump is fully aware of chain migration and its consequences.

Last year, in his State of the Union address, Trump touted ending chain migration. At various times in 2018 he enthusiastically supported Reforming American Immigration for a Stronger Economy (RAISE), legislation from senators Tom Cotton (R-AR) and David Purdue (R-GA), that favored skill-based over the current family-based immigration which drives more than 75 percent of the nation’s population growth. Assuming the status quo continues, by 2065, America will see an increase in population from today’s 328 million to more than 400 million.

Ignore for the moment the effect adding more work-authorized immigrants has on job competition and stagnant wages, and concentrate on the practical significance of adding ever-more people to the ever-swelling population of our country. Of course, adding more and more people to an already overpopulated country is something that apparently neither President Trump, nor private citizen Trump, has a clue about.

Whether President Trump is in the White House, Trump Tower or Mar-a-Lago, he’s isolated from the everyday reality of getting from one place to another. Among the many headaches the President doesn’t endure that are all too familiar to the rest of us are paralyzing Beltway traffic jams, maddening Florida I-95 traffic jams, and the stifling, undependable DC Metro or NYC Subway. President Trump will never be forced to, as I recently was, make a half-mile sprint and then jump on a tram through the sprawling Minneapolis/St. Paul Airport, carry-on luggage in hand, in a failed and frustrating effort to make my connecting flight.

When Trump returns to private citizen status, he will travel on his personal 757 equipped with 24-karat gold seat belts, the $100 million T-Bird as he lovingly calls his jumbo jet. In American presidential history, President Trump is the only office holder for which Air Force One represents a downgrade. For those shorter jaunts, the President owns a $7 million Sikorsky S-76 helicopter. The President sails through city streets preceded by a Secret Service manned motorcade.

But for most of us, more people means we’ll have to deal with more cars and buses that will hit the road, generating more traffic and inevitably more sprawl. Hard to believe though it is, air travel will become more uncomfortable as airports expand, and airline manufacturers produce larger seating capacity commercial jets.

On immigration and specifically on more immigration, President Trump is rejecting Americans’ wishes. A survey of 1,000 voters after the 2018 mid-term election found that 53 percent want to reduce legal immigration from its annual level of more than 1 million, while only 30 percent of voters want immigration increases.

With President Trump’s promotion of more immigration to grow our population even larger, it appears the Swamp has swallowed whole the country’s Chief Executive.

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Joe Guzzardi

Joe Guzzardi is a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist who writes about immigration and related social issues. Joe joined Progressives for Immigration Reform in 2018 as an analyst after a ten-year career directing media relations for Californians for Population Stabilization, where he also was a Senior Writing Fellow. A native Californian, Joe now lives in Pennsylvania. Contact him at jguzzardi@pfirdc.org

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