state legislation

Ninety days sine die - the end is near

Alert date: 
June 30, 2013
Alert body: 

The 2013 session of the Oregon Legislature is drawing to a close.  What that means to Protect Oregon Driver Licenses is that we have only 90 days sine die (from adjournment) to gather the 58,142 valid signatures we need to qualify and to get the SB 833 referendum on the November 2014 ballot.

So many of you are working so very hard and PODL appreciates each and every one of you.  But, now we need to really step on the gas and drive this buggy over the finish line with room to spare.

For those of you that have not yet started collecting signatures, I urge you to get started ASAP.  It's amazing to me how easy it is to collect signatures for this particular issue.  Remember, all we are doing is getting the new Legislation, SB 833 - giving driver privilege cards to illegal aliens - on the ballot so that Oregon voters have the opportunity to decide if they want this kind of law in our state.

There is no need to debate the immigration issue (which takes time away from signature gathering, too). 

Simply ask:  Do you think Oregon voters should have the opportunity to vote on SB 833 - a new law giving driver privilege cards to illegal aliens.

Most likely that's all you will need to say.  It's that easy!  So get out there, get going and start collecting signatures!  Our state's future depends on you!

Got to:  http://www.protectoregondl.org/announcements/tips-where-to-gather-signat... or  http://www.protectoregondl.org/announcements/upcoming-signature-gatherin... for great ideas.

Is your city or town on the honor list of signature gatherers?  If not, let us know!  http://www.oregonir.org/alerts/your-city-or-town-honor-list-get-game-today

Is our Legislature really on top of the situation?

According to a recent article in the Oregonian, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum has requested additional funding to help fight the cartels in Oregon. The request has gotten new interest in the Legislature because of a recent 5 part series of articles in the Oregonian about the cartel presence in Oregon. 

Last fall, I personally invited every Sheriff in the state to attend National Sheriff's Border School in El Paso, Texas with me.  Only two Oregon law enforcement officers attended.  Sheriff Ken Matlack of Morrow County and Tim Moore, Multnomah County Under-sheriff.  We learned things that were extremely alarming and very disturbing even for the lawmen.  Above all, we learned that what happens on the border doesn't stay on the border!  It was a chilling experience filling me with a sense of responsibility to inform our lawmakers and the public. 

I brought home with me a frightening documentary about the malignant spread of cartels into Oregon and across the country. I personally met with the producer who imbedded himself in a brutal Mexican drug cartel.

Upon my return, I took the documentary to Chris Gibson, HIDTA Director, for his input.  He told me he thought the film would be of great value to the public.  I reserved the Salem Public Library and put up posters all over town.  I printed invitations that I hand delivered to every Legislator with an email follow up invitation.  Not a single Legislator attended the presentation...although about 125 citizens did and they were shocked!  They asked why no Legislators attended.

Over the next month OFIR Board members visited many Legislators and explained what is happening with the invasion of drug cartels. We provided alarming maps showing Salem, OR, our Capitol city, on one of the main cartel routes. The majority of them seemed uninterested in our information.

Because the Legislature had opened the session, I decided to bring the documentary to them.  I showed the film two separate days at the Capitol Building.   Again, personal invitations, emails and phone calls were made and not a single Legislator attended the viewing, although many citizens did. 

Oregon is in serious trouble.  Cartels have established themselves and are conducting business every single day in our state. Yet, our Legislature seems completely clueless...or are they?

In spite of our continued correspondence, personal visits and research, in its infinite wisdom the Oregon Legislature fast tracked SB 833, giving driver privilege cards to illegal aliens.  The unintended consequences were never addressed and were ignored when OFIR pointed them out.  Never discussed publicly by Legislators was that one of the most prized possessions of a cartel operative is a STATE ISSUED ID and that's exactly what we will be giving them. 

Does anyone think this won't attract even more illegal alien criminals into our state, as well?

Protect Oregon Driver Licenses has filed a referendum to overturn SB 833.  Learn more about driver privilege cards for illegal aliens.

Does it take a series of articles in the Oregonian to capture the attention of the Legislature?  It shouldn't.  Legislators have had this information, courtesy of OFIR, for over 8 months now.  Read more about Is our Legislature really on top of the situation?

Florida governor vetoes 'Dream Act' driver's license bill

TALLAHASSEE, Fla., June 5 (UPI) -- The governor of Florida has vetoed a "well-intentioned" bill that would have allowed children of undocumented immigrants to get temporary drivers' licenses.

The "Dream Act Driver License" bill had passed through both chambers of the Legislature with only two dissenting votes, The Miami Herald and Tampa Bay Times reported Tuesday.

The bill used as its foundation a 2012 policy of the Obama administration that suspended for two years deportation actions against children illegally brought to the United States by their parents.

Gov. Rick Scott said lawmakers were "well-intentioned" in approving the measure, but that "it should not have been done by relying on a federal government policy adopted without legal basis."

Scott said the Obama policy did not have the force of law, noting that Florida law already allows non-citizens with federal work permits to get temporary drivers licenses.

Sen. Darren Soto, D-Orlando, called the governor's veto "simply unconscionable," adding that Scott had "missed an opportunity."

Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte, a former Florida state legislator, said the lack of citizenship does not prevent anyone from practicing any profession regulated by the state.

"Somebody in Florida who is not yet a citizen can get a doctor's license but not a driver's license," he said. "How absurd can we be?" Read more about Florida governor vetoes 'Dream Act' driver's license bill

Boxer Amendment: Redirect Border Funds for Immigrant Health Care

Sen. Barbara Boxer is planning an amendment to the Senate's immigration bill which would redirect funds committed to border security to reimburse state and local governments providing health care to newly legalized immigrants. Boxer plans to take $250 million, and likely much more, out of border security and use it to underwrite uninsured immigrants health care costs.

Supporters of the Senate bill have stressed repeatedly that newly legalized immigrants wouldn't be eligible for federal welfare benefits. In almost half the states, however, they would be eligible for state and local government assistance. The legalization in the Senate bill would put a strain on already stretched government budgets.

Boxer's amendment funds this assistance by using fees paid by illegal immigrants applying for legalization. Under the Senate bill currently, that money is earmarked for border security. The amendment is an admission that the rush to legalization will put a strain on taxpayers. It is also an admission that border security isn't a big priority for many of those supporting this bill.

Boxer is also seeking to allow newly legalized immigrants to access federal welfare benefits sooner. Currently, it could take up to 15 years for immigrants to access the full range of federal assistance programs. Boxer would like to reduce that by 5 years.

 

 

 

Read more about Boxer Amendment: Redirect Border Funds for Immigrant Health Care

Yet another state takes the hit

Oregonians should lend a shoulder to cry on for our friends in Colorado who have just had a bill signed into law giving driver licenses to illegal aliens in their state.  Unfortunately for them, their bill was loaded with a Public Safety clause so that it can't be challenged by Colorado's citizens.

Protect Oregon Driver Licenses filed a referendum just days after a similar bill, SB 833 was signed into law by Governor Kitzhaber here in Oregon.  We intend to collect 58,142 valid signatures so that we can get this issue on the ballot and give Oregon voters a voice and a vote on whether illegal aliens should be given driver licenses so they can drive to their jobs.

Our goal is to be the domino that just won't go down in the long line of dominoes at risk of falling.  Hopefully it will cause other states to take notice...citizens can and will fight back if pushed too hard.

The fact remains that liberal Democrats and even some off track Republicans are willfully ruining our country with horrendous legislation that undermines the rule of law, rewards illegal behavior and fails to protect the citizens of this great country from the damage caused by illegal immigration.

It would be a wonderful thing if so many of our politicians would get their eye off the ballot box and get their head in the game.  Our country, and our way of life, is deteriorating at an alarming rate and many State Legislatures and Congress are so arrogant they don't notice and don't even seem to care about the damage they are causing. Their concern about being re-elected is clouding their vision.

I told my State Senator, Peter Courtney, that when he retires I hope he looks back at all the damage he has done to our state and finally sees and acknowledges the results of his efforts.  I doubt he will, but at least the idea is planted.

It's a good thing we have elections...well, at least for now. Read more about Yet another state takes the hit

Immigrant driver's licenses signed in Colorado

DENVER (AP) — Immigrants living illegally in Colorado will be able to get driver's licenses under a bill signed Wednesday by Gov. John Hickenlooper, adding the state to a handful of others that provide a legal way for immigrants to use the roads.

The issue has picked up momentum this year, with Oregon and Nevada passing laws in recent weeks, and Connecticut's governor expected to pass a measure that lawmakers approved last week.

Hickenlooper said he saw the proposal as a step toward changing the nation's immigration laws.

"I'm not trying to tell Congress what form that takes, any of the details, but we are moving in that direction, and this is something that's a first step," the Democratic governor said.

The bill was signed in private, before the governor signed several other bills in front of lawmakers and the media. But Hickenlooper's office said the private signing was simply because one of the lead sponsors was out of town.

"We weren't trying to downplay it," spokesman Eric Brown said.

Supporters of the bill argued that everyone on the roads should know the rules and be insured, regardless of their immigration status.

The licenses would be labeled to say they are not valid for federal identification and can't be used to vote, obtain public benefits or board a plane. Hickenlooper said immigrants should have licenses that allow them to drive to work, get insurance, and be identified in car accidents, while at the same time making clear they are not U.S. citizens.

New Mexico, Illinois and Washington state already grant driver's licenses to immigrants who are in the country illegally. Utah grants immigrants a driving permit that can't be used for identification. Nevada's bill, signed into law last week, requires immigrants to prove their identity with a passport or birth certificate, and the "driving privilege cards" must be renewed annually.

In Colorado, immigrants pass a driver's license test and prove they're paying state and federal taxes. They also must show an identification card from their country of origin. The licenses would be renewed every three years.

But opponents argued there's no way to verify the identities of immigrants with certainty, and they worried the licenses wouldn't necessarily lead to more people having insurance. Republican Sen. Kevin Lundberg said he worried the proposal would encourage more people to come to Colorado illegally.

Colorado's bill takes effect Aug. 1, 2014. Legislative analysts who worked on the bill estimate that more than 45,000 immigrants will apply for licenses the first year. Read more about Immigrant driver's licenses signed in Colorado

Immigration group gears up for referendum on driver's card bill

An immigration group looking to overturn a recently passed law that allows residents without proof of legal presence to get driver’s cards ramped up their efforts Tuesday to bring the issue before Oregon voters.

Beneath a canopy outside the state Capitol, Oregonians for Immigration Reform officials passed out manila envelopes that included signature sheets for a referendum on Senate Bill 833.

The driver’s cards under the bill, which Gov. John Kitzhaber signed in May, would last four years instead of the standard eight years. Driver card applicants must meet other requirements, including knowledge of traffic laws and driving skills.

Sponsors of the referendum efforts would have to gather 58,142 valid signatures and file them by Sept. 26, which is 90 days after the targeted adjournment of the 2013 Legislature. The law would be suspended instead of taking effect in January if enough signatures were gathered to force a statewide election on the bill.

“It’s a herculean task but I think that Oregonians are really angry that this (bill) was rammed through,” said Cynthia Kendoll, the president for Oregonians for Immigration Reform.

The group was also protesting a federal immigration bill that would provide undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship. Buttons that read “Stop Illegal Immigration” were scattered on a table.

Supporters of the short-term driver cards argue the bill is about increasing public safety on the state’s roads not about immigration. But opponents say the new law would just condone illegal behavior.

Republican Reps. Sal Esquivel of Medford and Kim Thatcher of Keizer, and Richard LaMountain of Portland, recently filed the referendum papers for the bill with the secretary of state.

Esquivel told about two dozen people gathered on the Capitol steps in the rain that he doesn’t think the bill will help increase public safety and lawmakers who voted for the bill aren’t upholding the law.

“We are a country of laws. If you break the law to come here. Why would we allow that?,” Esquivel asked.

He unrolled a lengthy list of requirements residents have to meet to get a standard driver’s license, arguing that U.S. citizens were being treated as second rate.

Thatcher also announced the introduction of House Bill 3535, which would direct the Oregon Department of Transportation to report annually on the effects of implementing the driver’s card bill.

If the driver’s card bill is overturned, House Bill 3535 would not take effect.

By about 12:30 p.m., the group had distributed about 40 packets to those interested in gathering signatures for the referendum efforts.

If their measure qualifies for a statewide election, it would appear on the November 2014 ballot, although lawmakers can provide for a different date.

Luis Guerra, acting executive director of Causa, an immigration rights association that pushed for the passage of Senate Bill 833, said the group is keeping a close eye on the referendum efforts.

Guerra said that the driver’s card bill got bipartisan support in both legislative chambers and should be viewed as a public safety issue.

“We realize that they have a lot of signatures they need to collect so we’ll prepare as we need to based on how much work we see them accomplish,” he said. Read more about Immigration group gears up for referendum on driver's card bill

OFIR meeting June 1 at 2:00pm - SB833 Referendum, join us and learn more

Alert date: 
May 17, 2013
Alert body: 

Don't miss this meeting!  If you have never been actively involved in the immigration issue, now is the time to jump into the pool.

Saturday, June 1 at 2:00pm, OFIR will host its quarterly meeting at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn, just across from Costco in Salem.

We will be discussing the just filed referendum on SB833.  "Protect Oregon Driver Licenses" will be collecting 58,142 valid signatures of Oregon's registered voters to force the issue of giving driver privilege cards to illegal aliens on to the ballot.  We think Oregon citizens should decide, with their vote, if this is what we want in our state.

Come and learn more about this destructive bill, how it was fast-tracked through the Legislature, how we can stop it and what YOU can do to help!

Bring your friends and pick up the supplies you need to collect signatures of your friends, family, co-workers and neighbors.  We need your help NOW!

See you there!  Please remember to send in your signature sheets as you fill them.  We will also be collecting them at the meeting on Saturday.

How many filled signature sheets will you turn in at the meeting?
 

OFIR VP explains the flawed thinking behind SB833

Rick LaMountain is a gifted writer and has, once again, written such a clear headed article explaining why SB833 is not good for Oregon.  He explains the flawed and harmful thinking that went into the jettisoned legislation that went from first introduction to law in under one month.  Read Rick's article here. Read more about OFIR VP explains the flawed thinking behind SB833

Rep. Thatcher speaks out against SB833

Representative Kim Thatcher, a Chief Petitioner for the referendum campaign against SB833 expressed her concerns about the bill in a just published Guest Opinion.
  Read more about Rep. Thatcher speaks out against SB833

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