driver's license

Salem Immigrant Rights Rally to denounce Trump agenda

Multiple nonprofits, including unions and immigrants rights groups, are traveling to Salem on Jan. 14 to participate in the United for Immigrants Rights Rally. Set a week prior to the Jan. 20 presidential inauguration...

Phil Carrasco with Grupo Latino de Accíon Directa is orchestrating a trip from Eugene to Salem...

“We do believe that a lot of these policies being proposed are really based in hate and funded by hate groups and xenophobic groups.” And, he says, they also believe that the right to be in this country and walk freely is an exclusive privilege.

Carrasco says there’s been a call to repeal the state’s sanctuary status, which would allow the federal government to use state resources to enforce immigration policy. He says the effort could possibly show up as a ballot measure.

This is not the first time a state law that affects immigrants would be addressed in the form of a ballot measure. In 2014, Measure 88 failed to garner enough votes to grant driver cards to all Oregon residents, though the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 833, which permitted Oregonians to apply for driver cards, regardless of their immigration status.

Ultimately, SB 833 never went into effect.

Many people who do not have legal status in the U.S. pay taxes, funding roads, schools and other state resources, Carrasco says. “It’s important that it’s not just Latino-centric organizations participating,” he says.

Organizations representing health care, working families and labor unions are among the participants. Carrasco says these groups acknowledge that “an injury to one is an injury to all.”

Around 500 people are expected to attend, with 2,000 interested in the Facebook event. Carrasco invites anyone interested in attending and carpooling to contact him.

He adds that the event is “part of a national day of action to defend immigrant rights and to denounce Trump’s agenda of hate and exclusion in our state.”

The United for Immigrant Rights Rally is 11:30 am Saturday, Jan. 14, at the Capitol building in Salem. GLAD is on Facebook at latinocommunityactiongroup. And for carpool information contact Phil Carrasco at 541-337-6391.

USE it or LOSE it - Your Political Tax Credit can help OFIR continue our work

Alert date: 
2016-12-10
Alert body: 

On Election Day, American immigration patriots won a remarkable victory.

And thanks to our state's generous political tax credit -- explained below -- you can help amplify that victory right here in Oregon.

First, though, consider what we've achieved. For the first time in years, we will have a friend rather than a foe in the White House -- a presidential administration whose immigration policies will put the interests of Americans, and not illegal aliens, first.

President-elect Trump has pledged to secure our border and end the disastrous "catch and release" policy that has unleashed criminal aliens inside our country.

He has vowed to reverse the Obama executive orders that have given de facto amnesties to millions of illegal aliens.

And he'll work to push through Congress a law that will require employers, via E-Verify, to vet their new hires for proof of legal U.S. presence.

In short, he has pledged to take the actions that we at OFIR have urged on our leaders for years -- and worked hard to achieve at the state and local levels.

With your help, OFIR will continue that work -- to, among other things, repeal Oregon's illegal-alien sanctuary law, keep driver licenses out of the hands of illegal aliens, and assure that only U.S. citizens in Oregon register to vote.

But to pursue these goals, we need your financial help. And Oregon tax law gives you an easy way to provide that help without it costing you a dime if you owe Oregon income tax.

In Oregon, when filing their tax returns, taxpayers may contribute a certain portion of their state tax payment to an Oregon political action committee (PAC) -- $50 for those filing an individual return and $100 for those filing a joint return. In other words, you may elect to give money to a political action committee (PAC) that otherwise would go to the state government -- where it would be controlled by Kate Brown and the amnesty-supporting majority in the state legislature.

But here's the catch: To take that state tax credit, you must make the contribution by the end of that tax year -- no later than Dec. 31, 2016.  So before then, we hope you'll write a check or make an online contribution to OFIR PAC.  If contributing by check, please write the check to OFIR PAC.  Contributions to OFIR are not tax-deductible.  Mail checks to OFIR PAC, PO Box 7354, Salem OR 97303.  Thank you!

Two years ago, by spearheading the successful charge against illegal-alien driver cards, OFIR helped set in motion the great patriotic wave that culminated on Nov. 8.  We believe we've earned your trust -- and your ongoing support.  During this historic time -- this new dawn for America -- help us continue our efforts with your donation today.

Do you know what your favorite candidate really thinks about immigration?

OFIR has now posted reports on immigration positions of candidates

Please take a look at the important information OFIR has gathered and share it with others as widely as you can before the election.
 
OFIR has posted on its website detailed information on the immigration positions of many candidates in the November general election. 
 
Below is a list of the statewide offices for which information on immigration positions is available and has been posted.  There is also a report on the Presidential election candidates.
 
To see the entire list, you can visit http://www.oregonir.org/immigration-topics/2016-general-election.  Alternatively, you can visit the OFIR home page at: http://www.oregonir.org/, click on Immigration Topics in the right-column menu, then Elections, then 2016 General Election.
 

Should you have to prove citizenship to get a Washington driver’s license?

OLYMPIA – Legislation requiring Washington state residents to prove U.S. citizenship or legal residency to get state driver’s licenses so elections officials can ensure non-citizens are not trying to register to vote was proposed Friday by Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman.

The issue has come up in previous legislative sessions, but lawmakers have been unsuccessful in passing legislation.

On Friday, Wyman pointed to questions that have been raised about the citizenship of Arcan Cetin, who is charged with five counts of premeditated murder following the shooting deaths of five people at Cascade Mall in Burlington last week. Wyman said Cetin, who registered to vote in 2014, voted in three elections.

Washington is the only state in the country that does not require proof of legal presence in the U.S. to get a standard state driver’s license or ID...

Washington state is currently not in compliance with a 2005 federal law – known as REAL ID – that requires state driver’s licenses and ID cards to have security enhancements and be issued to people who can prove they are legally in the United States....

Currently there’s not a bill, but spokesman David Ammons said that Wyman hopes that key lawmakers who have long worked on this issue will have something to introduce when the Legislature convenes in January.

Wyman, joined by county election leaders, announced the proposal in Spokane. The package would also allow for automatic voter registration for people who present citizen verification when they get their licenses, as is done in Oregon. Voters in Washington would be able to opt out of automatic registration under the proposal. Wyman called her proposal “long overdue.”..

Military bases to refuse some New Mexico IDs

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Military installations in New Mexico, including Kirtland Air Force Base, will stop accepting some driver’s licenses for base access as early as Sept. 15 as implementation of the federal Real ID Act approaches, military officials said Tuesday.

While New Mexico-issued licenses and IDs are valid under Real ID criteria in some aspects until October 2020, at this point they won’t be accepted for Kirtland access after Oct. 10 of this year absent another extension – which is considered likely.

Meanwhile, state officials said Tuesday they hope to begin issuing new Real ID compliant licenses later this year. Under the new system, undocumented immigrants would be eligible only for driving authorization cards that are not valid for purposes of federal identification.

“We’re still on track and moving forward” on the implementation of the new two-tier system, said Benjamin Cloutier, a spokesman for the Department of Taxation and Revenue.

Beginning Sept. 15, identification cards or driver’s licenses issued by Minnesota, Missouri, Washington or American Samoa – which are not currently compliant with Real ID – cannot be used to access Kirtland, according to a base news release.

“New Mexico has received an extension for their state-issued ID cards through Oct. 10 of this year,” said Maj. Brent Pickrell, commander of Kirtland’s 377th Security Forces Squadron.

“New Mexico plans to file for another extension, and while we believe this request will likely be approved, we must plan for the contingency where it does not,” said Pickrell, who commands the unit at Kirtland that controls installation access.

Base officials expect resolutions for New Mexico and 28 other states and territories to be reached prior to Oct. 10, but they are preparing for the possibility that these IDs will become invalid, he said.

Holloman Air Force Base and White Sands Missile Range are implementing similar restrictions. Kirtland officials said the new rules are being implemented Air Force-wide. Officials at Cannon Air Force Base near Clovis did not immediately respond to a request about its access policies.

NM on track

New Mexico is awaiting approval from the federal Department of Homeland Security for its Real ID implementation plan and expects to begin issuing Real ID compliant licenses later this year.

Taxation and Revenue Secretary Demesia Padilla has told legislators the state got the go-ahead to order the fingerprint machines needed for background checks. The agency also has been working with a vendor that is designing the new licenses. Training for Motor Vehicle Division employees in the new system was to occur throughout August.

The new license system was approved by the Legislature and the governor this year, ending a contentious five-year debate over whether the state should continue issuing driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants.

Under the state’s plan, undocumented immigrants – along with any citizens who want them – will be able to get driving authorization cards that are not good for official, federal identification purposes. Citizens and others with a lawful presence will be able to get Real ID compliant licenses, as long as they provide the required documents, including certified copies of birth certificates and documents with Social Security numbers.

Fingerprinting will be required only of undocumented immigrants who are new applicants – that is, those without current New Mexico licenses.

Still, beginning Oct. 10, people with licenses or IDs from states or territories currently under an extension will need approved alternate forms of ID for unescorted base access, unless further extensions are approved.

Those states and territories are New Mexico, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, the Northern Mariana Islands, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Valid forms of identification for Kirtland

Kirtland officials said valid alternate forms of ID include:

■ U.S. passport.

■ U.S passport card.

■ Permanent resident card/alien registration receipt card (Form I-551).

■ A foreign passport with a temporary (I-551) stamp or temporary (I-551) printed notation on a machine readable immigrant visa.

■ An employment authorization document that contains a photograph (Form I- 766).

■ Identification card issued by federal, state or local government agencies, provided it contains a photograph and biographical information such as name, date of birth, gender, height, eye color, and address.

■ U.S. Coast Guard merchant mariner cards/credentials.

■ PIV or federally-issued PIV-1 Cards (personal identification verification) issued by the federal government.

■ PIV-I card (personal identification verification-interoperable issued by non-federal government entities).

■ DHS “Trusted Traveler Cards” (Global entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST).

■ Merchant mariner card issued by DHS/ United States Coast Guard (USCG).

■ Border crossing card (Form DSP-150).

■ U.S. certificate of naturalization or certificate of citizenship (Form N-550) and U.S. permanent resident card (Form I-551).

Kirtland officials also said that current holders of distinguished visitor’s passes would be granted access with the passes until they expire, and new passes would be issued according to the REAL ID requirements.

For a full list of REAL ID Act and compliant and non-complaint states, visit dhs.gov/current-status-states-territories [https://www.dhs.gov/current-status-states-territories].

OFIR VP lays out Trump's path to victory in Oregon

OFIR Vice President Richard LaMountain has clearly laid out a reasonable path to an Oregon win for Donald Trump's bid for the Presidency.

Oregon has a blue reputation, but, in this particular case, it may be tenuous at best.  

Read LaMountain's VDare article and then consider helping the first presidential candidate, in decades, that has openly and meaningfully addressed the problems surrounding illegal immigration.
 

Update: GOOD NEWS! Lawsuit to overturn Measure 88 dismissed

Alert date: 
2016-06-17
Alert body: 

Over six months ago, in an effort to overturn the resounding defeat of Measure 88 in the 2014 general election, a merit less and frivolous lawsuit was filed by five alleged illegal aliens, identified only by their initials and two small illegal alien special interest groups.

The US District Court in Eugene, where the lawsuit was filed, announced yesterday the case was dismissed.

UPDATE:  The five unnamed alleged illegal aliens that filed the lawsuit, that was ultimately dismissed, to overturn the defeat of Measure 88, have now filed an appeal.  OFIR will keep you posted.

Federal judge dismisses lawsuit seeking drivers licenses for illegal immigrants in Oregon

A judge in U.S. District Court in Eugene has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to give illegal immigrants in Oregon access to short-term drivers’ licenses.

The suit, filed on behalf of five unnamed illegal immigrants from Mexico, sought to restore a 2013 law, passed by the Oregon ­Legislature as Senate Bill 833, creating those new licenses. That law was overturned after it was referred to Oregon voters as Measure 88 in November 2014 and soundly defeated.

Oregon’s refusal to issue driver cards is unconstitutional because immigration regulation is done at the federal level and “is not a legitimate state interest,” the illegal immigrants’ lawsuit had argued. The refusal to issue licenses is “arbitrary” and “capricious” and is “motivated, at least in part, by animus towards Mexicans and Central Americans,” it said. The lawsuit named Democratic Gov. Kate Brown and leaders of the state ­Department of Transportation as ­defendants.

But, in a ruling released Monday, U.S. District Judge Ann Aiken wrote that she lacked the authority to compel the state to issue drivers’ licenses outright. Moreover, she found, SB 833 never went into effect as an Oregon law. That means that, even if Aiken invalidated the voters’ rejection of Measure 88 as unconstitutional, “no (existing) law authorizes the state to grant driver cards,” Aiken wrote.

“As such, the state defendants are not refusing to issue driver cards because a referendum motivated by discriminatory animus prevents them from doing so; they cannot issue driver cards because no valid, existing Oregon law authorizes them to do so,” Aiken wrote.

Aiken’s ruling supported the argument made by the state attorney general’s office in its motion to dismiss.

Sarah Weston, assistant attorney general, wrote that the state “agrees that enacting a driver card program would have benefited (the plaintiffs) and would have been good policy for the state.”

But “the relief the plaintiffs seek — the enactment and implementation of SB 833 — cannot be imposed on the state by the federal court in this action,” Weston wrote.

“Just as would be the case with any other bill that failed to become law via the legislative process, if plaintiffs seek to have SB 833 enacted, they must try again via that process,” she added.

Representatives of the Oregon Law Center, which filed the suit on behalf of the five immigrants and two Latino-focused nonprofit organizations, could not be reached for comment on Aiken’s ruling Monday.

Oregonians for Immigration Reform, the chief opponents of Measure 88, applauded the decision.

“Today, the court has dismissed the meritless and frivolous case,” the group said in a statement. “Nearly a million voters said ‘no’ — and now the Court is standing with us. No driver cards for those who can’t prove they are legally present in the country.”

For many years, Oregon allowed residents to get a driver’s license regardless of his or her legal status. But starting in 2008, because of the federal REAL ID Act, ­residents have had to prove legal status to get one.

Measure 88 would have created a new type of short-term driver’s license, available to anyone who had lived in Oregon for at least a year.

Twelve states now provide drivers’ licenses regardless of people’s legal status, including Washington state, California and Nevada.

Follow Saul on Twitter @SaulAHubbard . Email saul.hubbard@registerguard.com .
 

Court dismisses lawsuit against Oregon Measure 88!

Over 6 months ago, 5 alleged illegal aliens, identified only by their initials and two illegal alien special interest groups, filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court in Eugene to overturn the defeat of Measure 88 and to restore SB 833 - providing state-issued photo ID in the form of driver cards to those who could not prove they are legally present in the U.S.
 
In the general election of 2014 nearly a million Oregon voters said NO, 35 of 36 counties voted NO, and all 5 congressional districts voted NO on giving state issued photo ID to illegal aliens. But, on the one year anniversary of the overwhelming defeat of driver cards, 5 alleged illegal aliens filed a lawsuit to overturn that resounding NO vote.
 
Today, the court has DISMISSED the meritless and frivolous case. The vote of Oregon citizens stands.
 
From the judges’ published opinion:
 
Under the Oregon Constitution, Oregon voters retain the right of referendum to approve or reject legislation enacted by the Oregon legislature. Or. Const. art. IV,§ 1(3)(a) ("The people reserve to themselves the referendum power, which is to approve or reject at an election any Act, or pati thereof, of the Legislative Assembly that does not become effective earlier than 90 days after the end of the session at which the Act is passed."). "When a referendum is invoked, the act of the legislature then becomes merely a measure to be voted on by the people, and, if the people vote in the affirmative, the measure becomes an act; if they vote in the negative, the measure fails."
 
Nearly a million voters said NO - and now the Court is standing with us. NO driver cards for those who can't prove they are legally present in the country.
 

 

Related news release
 
Victory in Oregon!
 
 
Immigration Reform Law Institute
25 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 335
Washington, DC 2001
 
 
Protecting the right of Americans to govern themselves 
 
May 16, 2016
 
(Washington, D.C.) – Today, a federal judge in Oregon dismissed a lawsuit (opinion attached here) brought by five admitted illegal aliens and two illegal alien special interest groups that requested the court force the State of Oregon to grant driving privileges to illegal aliens. In January, the Immigration Reform Law Institute (“IRLI”), along with Jill Gibson of the Gibson Law Firm, LLC, filed a motion to intervene in the suit and a motion to dismiss the case as lacking merit on behalf of their client Oregonians for Immigration Reform (“OFIR”).
 
Specifically, the lawsuit sought to overturn as unconstitutional the outcome of the November 2014 general election in Oregon, when, through the Oregon Constitution’s referendum veto process, Oregon voters overwhelmingly rejected (by more than 66% of voters) a bill passed by the legislature and signed by the governor that would have extended eligibility for driving privileges to unlawfully present persons. OFIR was the driving force behind the referendum veto that collected the requisite number of signatures to get the issue placed on the ballot.
 
Today, the Oregon U.S. District Court ruled that it could “not order the State to comply with legislation that could not and would not become effective, and no ruling would redress plaintiffs’ alleged injury.” Moreover, the court stated that it had “no authority to substitute the voter approval required by the Oregon Constitution” and “principles of federalism underlying the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments forbid th[e] Court from directing the State to enact or enforce state laws.”
 
Dale L. Wilcox, IRLI’s Executive Director commented, “We are happy with the outcome of this case. This case had no merit whatsoever and was a waste of the court’s time and precious resources.” Wilcox continued, “As I stated previously, this case was about sour grapes as the overwhelming majority of Oregonians had spoken and rejected at the ballot box taxpayer-funded giveaways to those who have no legal right to be here.”
 
Read the full Court opinion.
 

 

Learn more
 

 

Hit-and-run driver facing possible extradition, deportation

EAST BRUNSWICK TOWNSHIP, Pa. -  State police say a 38-year-old man may be extradited and deported after he was arrested and charged for a hit-and-run crash in Schuylkill County.

The crash happened back on Feb. 26 along Route 443, about a half-mile east of New Ringgold Borough.

According to police, a Honda Accord and Dodge Dart were traveling westbound when the Accord tried to pass the Dart around a curve in the roadway.

When the Accord went to merge back into the right lane, police say the passenger side of the vehicle struck the front driver side of the Dart.

When both vehicles entered New Ringgold, the Accord fled the scene, turning left and traveling southbound, into a public park.

The driver of the Dart followed the Accord, and was able to photograph the vehicle's license plate with her cell phone.

Police say the Accord then fled the scene without stopping, and took off through New Ringgold.

Two weeks later, early Saturday morning, the Accord was spotted traveling eastbound along Route 443 outside the borough.

A traffic stop was initiated near Schuylkill Road, according to a state police press release.

The description of the driver matched the description that was given by the driver of the Dart in February, and police say the registration was also a match.

The driver of the Accord - identified as 38-year-old Daniel Naploes Herrera - admitted to being the driver involved in the hit-and-run. Herrera told police he fled because he did not have a valid driver's license.

Herrera was taken into custody and transported back to the state police barracks in Frackville where he was fingerprinted.

That's when police discovered Herrera was a wanted person from Oregon, and also illegally entered into the United States as a citizen of Mexico.

Herrera was hit with a number of traffic-related charges, including careless driving and failing to have a valid license. He was arraigned and committed to the Schuylkill County Prison.

State police say a detainer was also placed on Herrera by the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Department.

Herrera is currently awaiting possible extradition back to Oregon and possible deportation back to Mexico.

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