FBI

Local deputy killed 6 years ago, suspect remains on the loose

MARION COUNTY, OR (KPTV) - A Marion County deputy responding to an emergency was killed in a crash, leading to the death of a passenger in the other car six years ago.

The driver of that car remains on the loose today.

Deputy Kelly Fredinburg was hit and killed on Highway 99 E north of Gervais on Sunday, June 16, 2007. Fredinburg was 33 years old.

Investigators said Fredinburg was driving to an emergency call at 11:30 p.m. that night when his patrol car was hit head-on by a car driven by Alfredo De Jesus Ascencio.

Fredinburg's car caught fire and he was pronounced dead at the scene. Oscar Ascencio-Amaya, 19, was in the other car and he died the next day at the hospital. A second passenger received minor injuries.

De Jesus Ascencio turned 26 in January. He was treated for critical injuries at the time of the crash. Investigators later learned he fled the U.S. to Mexico around the time of his indictment for criminally negligent homicide in August 2007.

Investigators believe he remains in Mexico. He was last thought to be in the area of Puacuaro, Michoacan, Mexico.

Last year, Fredinburg's family announced the Oregon Officer Reward Fund. Its purpose is to help find suspects wanted in connection with officer injuries or deaths in the line of duty. The reward in this case is $20,000.

Crime Stoppers is offering an additional $1,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.

For more information about the Oregon Officer Reward Fund, go to www.oorf.info.
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Secure Communities Program Is Now Statewide in Oregon

As of September 27 all Oregon counties are now signed up for the Secure Communities program run by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). This is a major milestone in the battle against illegal immigration.

What this means is that anyone booked into a county jail in Oregon will have their FBI fingerprints screened against the immigration data base of ICE.  Fake driver licenses and stolen Social Security numbers will no longer protect illegal aliens from being identified.

The following is ICE’s description of the Secure Communities program

Secure Communities is a simple and common sense way to carry out ICE's priorities. It uses an already-existing federal information-sharing partnership between ICE and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that helps to identify criminal aliens without imposing new or additional requirements on state and local law enforcement. For decades, local jurisdictions have shared the fingerprints of individuals who are booked into jails with the FBI to see if they have a criminal record.

Under Secure Communities, the FBI automatically sends the fingerprints to ICE to check against its immigration databases. If these checks reveal that an individual is unlawfully present in the United States or otherwise removable due to a criminal conviction, ICE takes enforcement action – prioritizing the removal of individuals who present the most significant threats to public safety as determined by the severity of their crime, their criminal history, and other factors – as well as those who have repeatedly violated immigration laws.

Secure Communities imposes no new or additional requirements on state and local law enforcement, and the federal government, not the state or local law enforcement agency, determines what immigration enforcement action, if any, is appropriate.

Last year ICE deported 395,000 illegal aliens.  About one-half, or 195,000 were criminal aliens. A criminal alien is defined as someone who has committed additional crimes beyond being in the United States illegally.  About one-third of the deported criminal aliens, about 66,000, had been convicted of murder, rape or major drug trafficking.

For more information, go to www.ice.gov/secure_communities. Read more about Secure Communities Program Is Now Statewide in Oregon

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