drugs

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report for the Americas September 2016

Data obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated that on September 1, 2016 there were 955 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state's prison system.

Breaking the DOC criminal alien prison population down by a specific geographic region of the world, 844 of the prisoners self-declared countries of origin were located in the Americas: North, Central and South America and the West Indies (Excluding the United States of America and its territories):

- North America had 771 criminal aliens, 91.35 percent of the DOC prisoners from the Americas;

- Central America had 52 criminal aliens, 6.16 percent of the DOC prisoners from the Americas;

- South America had six criminal aliens, 0.71 percent of the DOC prisoners from the Americas;

- The West Indies had 16 criminal aliens, 1.89 percent of the DOC prisoners from the Americas.

The 844 prisoners in the DOC prison system from the Americas were 88.38 percent of the total criminal alien prison population.

Some background information, all criminal aliens incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Once identified by ICE these criminal aliens had immigration detainers placed on them by immigration officials monitoring the state's prisons. After these criminal alien inmates have completed their state sanctions, prison officials will transfer custody of these inmates to ICE.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 844 criminal alien prisoners from the Americas by number and percentage incarcerated on September 1st in the state's prisons.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Country DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from the Americas DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers from the Americas
Mexico 766 90.76%
Guatemala 21 2.49%
Cuba 14 1.66%
El Salvador 14 1.66%
Honduras 10 1.18%
Canada 5 0.59%
Costa Rica 3 0.36%
Ecuador 3 0.36%
Peru 3 0.36%
Nicaragua 2 0.24%
Belize 1 0.12%
Jamaica 1 0.12%
Panama 1 0.12%
Total 844 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

The preceding table reveals that criminal aliens from thirteen countries located in the Americas were incarcerated in the DOC prison system. Mexico with 766 prisoners equated to 90.76 percent of the criminal aliens from the Americas incarcerated in the state's prisons.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 844 criminal aliens from the Americas.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners from the Americas incarcerated on September 1st by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Crime DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from the Americas DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers from the Americas
Sex Abuse 170 20.14%
Rape 156 18.48%
Homicide 120 14.22%
Drugs 99 11.73%
Sodomy 84 9.95%
Assault 71 8.41%
Robbery 40 4.74%
Kidnapping 24 2.84%
Theft 14 1.66%
Burglary 12 1.42%
Driving Offense 6 0.71%
Vehicle Theft 3 0.36%
Arson 0 0.00%
Forgery 0 0.00%
Escape 0 0.00%
Other / Combination 45 5.33%
Total 844 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

The preceding table reveals that 410 criminal aliens (48.58 percent) of those DOC prisoners from the Americas were incarcerated for three types of sex crimes: sex abuse, rape and sodomy.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners from the Americas incarcerated on September 1st that were sent to prison from the state's 36 counties.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
County DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from the Americas DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers from the Americas
Marion 216 25.59%
Multnomah 163 19.31%
Washington 160 18.96%
Clackamas 66 7.82%
Lane 43 5.09%
Jackson 32 3.79%
Yamhill 22 2.61%
Umatilla 20 2.37%
Linn 16 1.90%
Benton 12 1.42%
Klamath 12 1.42%
Polk 12 1.42%
Malheur 12 1.42%
Lincoln 9 1.07%
Deschutes 8 0.95%
Jefferson 6 0.71%
Coos 5 0.59%
Josephine 5 0.59%
Douglas 4 0.47%
Morrow 4 0.47%
Clatsop 3 0.36%
Crook 3 0.36%
Tillamook 3 0.36%
Wasco 3 0.36%
Hood River 2 0.24%
Gilliam 1 0.12%
Lake 1 0.12%
Union 1 0.12%
Baker 0 0.00%
Columbia 0 0.00%
Curry 0 0.00%
Grant 0 0.00%
Harney 0 0.00%
Sherman 0 0.00%
Wallowa 0 0.00%
Wheeler 0 0.00%
Total 844 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

Twenty- eight Oregon counties had at least one criminal alien from the Americas incarcerated in DOC prisons. Five of the state's counties, Marion, Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas and Lane, had 648 prisoners (76.78 percent) of the criminal aliens from the Americas incarcerated in the state's prisons.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and percentages by countries of origin, by crime types or by the state's counties, criminal aliens from the Americas pose high economic cost on Oregon tax payers.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC's incarceration cost for its 844 criminal alien prison population from the Americas is approximately ($79,800.20) per day, ($558,601.40) per week, and ($29,127,073.00) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2015 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,602,510.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2016, the cost to incarcerate 844 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($27,524,563.00).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 844 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated September 1, 2016.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts 53-DOC/GECO: 3/23/16:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2015 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY-2015-SCAAP-Awards.pdf

David Olen Cross of Salem writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He is a weekly guest on the Lars Larson Northwest Show. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

http://blog.oregonlive.com/myoregon/2016/09/oregon_department_of_correctio_4.html

Immigration Officers Endorse Trump

The National Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Council made its first political endorsement in a national campaign Monday, backing Donald Trump on the morning of the first presidential debate.

The National ICE Council, the union representing 5,000 federal immigration officers and law enforcement support staff, decided to endorse the GOP nominee after carefully considering the impact a Hillary Clinton presidency would have on their officers. Saying that Clinton has embraced the “unconstitutional executive orders” of President Barack Obama, Chris Crane, president of the National ICE Council, said in a statement that these orders “have forced our officers to violate their oaths to uphold the law and placed every person living in America at risk — including increased risk of terrorism.”

“Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, has promised the most radical immigration agenda proposal in U.S. history,” Crane added. “Her radical plan would result in the loss of thousands of innocent American lives, mass victimization and death for many attempting to immigrate to the United States, the total gutting of interior enforcement, the handcuffing of ICE officers, and an uncontrollable flood of illegal immigrants across U.S. borders.”

“The non-enforcement agenda of this administration, favored by Secretary Clinton, results in the daily loss of life and victimization of many, to include not only American citizens but also those attempting to immigrate to our country.”

Crane noted ICE officers provide the “last line of defense” for American communities against the threats posed by illegal immigration. Lamenting the fact that the officers are “underfunded and undermanned” as they try to uphold and enforce U.S. laws, Crane painted a bleak picture of the current situation faced by ICE officers.

“Our officers come into daily contact with many of the most dangerous people in the world — cartel members, gang members, weapons traffickers, murder suspects, drug dealers, suspects of violent assault — yet ICE officers are unable to arrest or are forced to release many of the most dangerous back into U.S. communities due to unscrupulous political agendas and corrupt leaders,” Crane said.

After noting that only 5 percent of the council's membership supported Clinton's presidential bid, Crane lambasted the Democratic presidential nominee for catering to the special interest groups and "open-borders radicals" all in the name of "cheap labor, greed and votes."

"Let us be clear: The non-enforcement agenda of this administration, favored by Secretary Clinton, results in the daily loss of life and victimization of many, to include not only American citizens but also those attempting to immigrate to our country," Crane said. "These victims will never have their photos shown on TV, but their families' suffering is no less real."

Crane praised Trump for his willingness to meet with him and discuss his policies and goals for improving and aiding immigration enforcement.

"America has been lied to about every aspect of immigration in the United States," Crane concluded. "We can fix our broken immigration system, and we can do it in a way that honors America's legacy as a land of immigrants, but Donald Trump is the only candidate who is willing to put politics aside so that we can achieve that goal."

Trump: Not ‘One More American Life’ for Open Borders

Speaking to the families of those who have lost loved ones at the hands of illegal immigrant criminals Saturday afternoon in Houston, Texas, Donald Trump eviscerated the nation’s leaders for failing to protect American lives.

Speaking at a luncheon hosted by The Remembrance Project, the Republican presidential nominee said the victims of illegal alien crime had been “forced into the shadows” because politicians and media at large refuse to hear their stories and validate their grievances. Expressing his support for the families in their “lonely fight for justice,” Trump promised to stand with them and hold the government accountable for its “most fundamental duty” — to protect American lives.

“Our nation should not accept one lost American life because our country failed to enforce its laws.”

“There are a lot of numbers in the immigration debate. But let me give you the most important number of all,” Trump said. “That most important number of all is the number of American lives it is acceptable to lose in the name of illegal immigration. Let me tell you what that number is: ZERO,” he added. “Our nation should not accept one lost American life because our country failed to enforce its laws.”

Speaking softly to the audience members gathered at the event, Trump said that The Remembrance Project, which advocates for families who have lost loved ones at the hands of illegal immigrants, helped to bring attention to an issue that has become a “personal passion” for him.

“I have met many incredible people during the course of this campaign. But nothing has moved me more deeply than the time I’ve spent with the families of The Remembrance Project, and the incredible strength and courage you’ve shown in your often lonely fight for justice,” Trump said. “You are heroes. And your actions will help us to save the next thousand American citizens from losing their brothers, sisters, sons, daughters or parents.”

Trump lambasted the policies of the Obama administration and the policies promoted by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton that have led to the release of nearly 13,000 criminal aliens between 2008-2014 back into the U.S. after their home countries refused to take them back, according to a report from The Boston Globe. Decrying Clinton’s plans for "total amnesty," protecting Sanctuary Cities and authorizing a "catch-and-release" border policy, Trump called Clinton to account for her failures.

"Most of these 13,000 releases occurred on Hillary Clinton’s watch — she had the power and the duty to stop it cold and she didn’t do it," Trump told the grieving families. "Now, my opponent will never meet with you. She will never hear your stories. She will never share in your pain. She will only meet with the donors and the special interests and the open border advocates."

Trump promised to enforce the rule of law and work as an advocate for these families if he is elected on Nov. 8.

"Your cause and your stories are ignored by our political establishment because they are determined to keep our borders open at any cost. To them, your presence is just too inconvenient," Trump said. "This must end. And it must end right now. Not one more American life should be given up in the name of open borders."

Immediately after Trump’s speech, his campaign released a statement from Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions — a vocal Trump surrogate and fervent advocate for clamping down on illegal immigrant crime.

"This serious problem was well known to Hillary Clinton the entire time she was secretary of state. Yet she failed to stop this practice when she had the duty and responsibility do so as secretary of state, failing to follow clear legal requirement passed by Congress," Sessions said. "Hillary Clinton must explain to the American people, and especially to the victims of these criminal aliens who were not deported, why she did not act to prevent these tragic events."

Clinton knew thousands of criminal aliens were being released, did nothing

September 14, 2016

Federal records show that from 2008 to 2014, nearly 13,000 criminal aliens who had been ordered deported were released back onto our streets because their home countries refused to take them back. This unacceptable practice has allowed many of these criminal aliens to commit new and serious crimes after their release, including rape, assault, child molestation, drug dealing, and murder. This serious problem was well known to Hillary Clinton the entire time she was Secretary of State. Yet she failed to stop this practice when she had the duty and responsibility do so as Secretary of State, failing to follow clear legal requirement passed by Congress.

Section 243(d) of the Immigration and Nationality Act commands that when a foreign nation refuses or “unreasonably” delays the return of one of their nationals, the Secretary of State shall order our consular officials to stop issuing visas to persons from that country. As Secretary, she clearly had both actual and constructive notice about these practices from many nations. Yet, Hillary Clinton failed to fulfill her duty to use this authority and stop this practice, even once. For most nations, using this authority will get compliance in short order. Of course, there are many other diplomatic and financial actions the United States can take to promptly end the refusals and delays.

While the full scope of this problem and all of the crimes may not be known to the public, the available information is disturbing.

The Boston Globe has reported that between 2008 and 2014, almost 13,000 convicted aliens that should have been detained until deported, were released onto our streets, resulting in numerous totally preventable rapes, assaults and murders, among other crimes. For example, a convicted criminal alien who should have been deported to Haiti in 2012 was instead released, and murdered 25-year-old Casey Chadwick just last year. The Boston Globe further reported that, out of the data it analyzed, there were more convicted killers released from 2008 to 2012 than traffic violators.

Hillary Clinton must explain to the American people, and especially to the victims of these criminal aliens who were not deported, why she did not act to prevent these tragic events.

Jeff Sessions represents Alabama in the United States Senate, where he is chairman of the Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest.

 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report September 2016

NOTE:  For fiscal year 2016, the cost to the Dept. of Corrections to incarcerate 955 criminal aliens will be well over $30 million dollars!  And, this amount doesn't even include the costs for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

When open borders advocates tell us that illegal immigration is good for our economy, I don't think they are factoring in all the costs of their presence in our state. 

Furthermore, for every crime listed below, there is most often an innocent victim left behind.

Our elected officials must be held accountable for such an irresponsible lack of action to correct this travesty.  Ask your candidates what they propose to do, if elected, to correct this devastating problem.  Learn more about the candidates and their positions on illegal immigration and how to solve it. 

CK

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The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) September 1, 2016 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,685 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on September 1st there were 955 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.50 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 955 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on September 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

September 1, 2016

14,685

13,730

955

6.50%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 September 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on September 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

239

25.03%

Multnomah

205

21.47%

Washington

183

19.16%

Clackamas

74

7.75%

Lane

50

5.24%

Jackson

33

3.46%

Yamhill

22

2.30%

Umatilla

20

2.09%

Linn

17

1.78%

Klamath

13

1.36%

Polk

13

1.36%

Benton

12

1.26%

Malheur

12

1.26%

Lincoln

9

0.94%

Deschutes

8

0.84%

Jefferson

6

0.63%

Coos

5

0.52%

Josephine

5

0.52%

Clatsop

4

0.42%

Douglas

4

0.42%

Morrow

4

0.42%

Crook

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Wasco

3

0.31%

Hood River

2

0.21%

Union

2

0.21%

Columbia

1

0.10%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

955

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 955 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on September 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

182

19.06%

Rape

174

18.22%

Homicide

136

14.24%

Drugs

104

10.89%

Sodomy

95

9.95%

Assault

81

8.48%

Robbery

55

5.76%

Kidnapping

28

2.93%

Theft

23

2.41%

Burglary

18

1.88%

Driving Offense

7

0.73%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.42%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

48

5.03%

Total

955

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from September 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,753

1,571

182

10.38%

Rape

977

803

174

17.81%

Homicide

1,666

1,530

136

8.16%

Drugs

918

814

104

11.33%

Sodomy

1,030

935

95

9.22%

Assault

1,952

1,871

81

4.15%

Robbery

1,558

1,503

55

3.53%

Kidnapping

295

267

28

9.49%

Burglary

1,332

1,309

23

1.73%

Theft

1,159

1,141

18

1.55%

Driving Offense

243

236

7

2.88%

Vehicle Theft

438

434

4

0.91%

Arson

79

79

0

0.00%

Forgery

37

37

0

0.00%

Escape

43

43

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,205

1,157

48

3.98%

Total

14,685

13,730

955

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 September 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 955 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on September 1st  in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

766

80.21%

Guatemala

21

2.20%

Cuba

14

1.47%

El Salvador

14

1.47%

Ukraine

11

1.15%

Vietnam

11

1.15%

Honduras

10

1.05%

Russia

9

0.94%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.73%

Canada

5

0.52%

Laos

5

0.52%

Philippines

5

0.52%

Other Countries

77

8.06%

Total

955

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 September 16.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 955 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,295.25) per day, ($632,066.75) per week, and ($32,957,766.25) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2015 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,602,510.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2016, the cost to incarcerate 955 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,355,256.25).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 955 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile September 1, 2016:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201609.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated September 1, 2016.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts 53-DOC/GECO: 3/23/16:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2015 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY-2015-SCAAP-Awards.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report June 2016

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) June 2016 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,709 inmates incarcerated in the DOC's 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on June 1st there were 954 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state's prison system; more than one in every sixteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.48 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 954 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency's request, DOC officials will place an "ICE detainer" on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on June 1st in the state's prisons.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Month/Day/Year DOC Total Inmates DOC Domestic Inmates DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers
June 1, 2016 14,709 13,755 954 6.48%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 June 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on June 1st that were sent to prison from the state's 36 counties.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
County DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers
Marion 237 24.84%
Multnomah 209 21.91%
Washington 184 19.29%
Clackamas 69 7.23%
Lane 50 5.24%
Jackson 32 3.35%
Yamhill 22 2.31%
Linn 18 1.89%
Umatilla 18 1.89%
Klamath 14 1.47%
Polk 14 1.47%
Benton 12 1.26%
Malheur 12 1.26%
Lincoln 10 1.05%
Deschutes 8 0.84%
Coos 6 0.63%
Jefferson 6 0.63%
Josephine 6 0.63%
Clatsop 4 0.42%
Crook 3 0.31%
Douglas 3 0.31%
Tillamook 3 0.31%
Wasco 3 0.31%
Morrow 3 0.31%
Hood River 2 0.21%
Union 2 0.21%
Columbia 1 0.10%
Gilliam 1 0.10%
Lake 1 0.10%
OOS 1 0.10%
Baker 0 0.00%
Curry 0 0.00%
Grant 0 0.00%
Harney 0 0.00%
Sherman 0 0.00%
Wallowa 0 0.00%
Wheeler 0 0.00%
Total 954 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 954 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on June 1st by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Crime DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers
Sex Abuse 186 19.50%
Rape 173 18.13%
Homicide 136 14.25%
Drugs 102 10.69%
Sodomy 92 9.64%
Assault 77 8.07%
Robbery 55 5.76%
Kidnapping 32 3.35%
Theft 24 2.51%
Burglary 18 1.89%
Driving Offense 9 0.94%
Vehicle Theft 3 0.31%
Arson 0 0.00%
Forgery 0 0.00%
Escape 0 0.00%
Other / Combination 47 4.93%
Total 954 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from June 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Crime DOC Total Inmates DOC Domestic Inmates DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers
Sex Abuse 1,733 1,547 186 10.73%
Rape 971 798 173 17.82%
Homicide 1,665 1,529 136 8.17%
Drugs 934 832 102 10.92%
Sodomy 1,034 942 92 8.90%
Assault 1,922 1,845 77 4.01%
Robbery 1,574 1,519 55 3.49%
Kidnapping 294 262 32 10.88%
Burglary 1,382 1,358 24 1.74%
Theft 1,159 1,141 18 1.55%
Driving Offense 250 241 9 3.60%
Vehicle Theft 431 428 3 0.70%
Arson 78 78 0 0.00%
Forgery 37 37 0 0.00%
Escape 48 48 0 0.00%
Other / Combination 1,197 1,150 47 3.93%
Total 14,709 13,755 954
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16 and Inmate Population Profile 01 June 16.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 954 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on June 1st in the state's prisons.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Country DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers
Mexico 763 79.98%
Guatemala 24 2.51%
Cuba 16 1.68%
El Salvador 14 1.47%
Russia 11 1.15%
Ukraine 11 1.15%
Vietnam 11 1.15%
Honduras 10 1.05%
Federated States of Micronesia 6 0.63%
Canada 5 0.52%
Laos 5 0.52%
Philippines 5 0.52%
Other Countries 73 7.65%
Total 954 100.00%
Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC's incarceration cost for its 954 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($90,200.70) per day, ($631,404.90) per week, and ($32,923,255.50) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2015 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,602,510.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2016, the cost to incarcerate 954 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($31,320,745.50).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 954 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile June 1, 2016:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201606.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated June 1, 2016.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts 53-DOC/GECO: 3/23/16:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2015 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY-2015-SCAAP-Awards.pdf

David Olen Cross, Salem writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He is a weekly guest on the Lars Larson Northwest Show. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

Illegal aliens who murder the residents of Oregon

The shooting deaths of three Oregon residents, a woman and two men on Monday, June 27, 2016 in Oregon’s Marion County draws attention to the number of criminal aliens now incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system for crime of homicide.

Late last month, on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 Bonifacio Oseguera-Gonzalez, age 29, a resident of Woodburn, Oregon, made his first appearance in a Marion County Circuit Court where he was charged with three counts of aggravated murder in a shooting deaths of Katie Gildersleeve, age 30, a resident of Lincoln County, Ruben Rigoberto-Reyes, age 60, and Edmundo Amaro-Bajonero, age 26, and one count of attempted murder in the wounding of Refugio Modesto-DeLaCruz, age 27; all the men were residents of Marion County.

According to Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesperson Virginia Kice alleged triple murderer Mexican national Bonifacio Oseguera-Gonzalez has been deported six times between the years of 2003 and 2013.

Bonifacio Oseguera-Gonzalez has been incarcerated at the Marion County Correctional Facility (MCCF) in Salem, Oregon since the time of his arrest on June 27th.

The number of criminal alien inmates with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) requested immigration detainers incarcerated in the DOC prison system for the crime of homicide is displayed in the tables below.

The DOC on June 1, 2016 had 954 criminal aliens incarcerated in for various crimes, 136 aliens (14.25 percent) were incarcerated for the crime of homicide.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners on June 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties incarcerated for the crime of homicide.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers incarcerated for Homicide

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers incarcerated for Homicide

Multnomah

37

27.21%

Washington

22

16.18%

Marion

21

15.44%

Umatilla

10

7.35%

Clackamas

8

5.88%

Jackson

6

4.41%

Lane

6

4.41%

Yamhill

4

2.94%

Klamath

3

2.21%

Linn

3

2.21%

Benton

2

1.47%

Josephine

2

1.47%

Lincoln

2

1.47%

Polk

2

1.47%

Clatsop

1

0.74%

Coos

1

0.74%

Douglas

1

0.74%

Gilliam

1

0.74%

Jefferson

1

0.74%

Malheur

1

0.74%

OOS (Not a county)

1

0.74%

Tillamook

1

0.74%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Crook

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Deschutes

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Hood River

0

0.00%

Lake

0

0.00%

Morrow

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wasco

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

136

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16.

A total of 21 Oregon counties had at least one criminal alien incarcerated in the DOC prison system for the crime of homicide.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 136 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on June 1st  in the state’s prisons for the crime of homicide.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers incarcerated for Homicide

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers incarcerated for Homicide

Mexico

108

79.41%

Canada

3

2.21%

Cuba

3

2.21%

Vietnam

3

2.21%

Cambodia

2

1.47%

Guatemala

2

1.47%

Laos

2

1.47%

Marshall Islands

2

1.47%

South Korea

2

1.47%

China

1

0.74%

Costa Rica

1

0.74%

El Salvador

1

0.74%

Japan

1

0.74%

Nicaragua

1

0.74%

Nigeria

1

0.74%

Peru

1

0.74%

Philippines

1

0.74%

Turkey

1

0.74%

Total

136

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 16.

A total of 18 countries had at least one criminal alien incarcerated in the DOC prison system for the crime of homicide.

http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

 

David Cross - foreign national crime tracker attends DC conference

You may have heard David Cross on the Lars Larson Show each Thursday afternoon, reporting about the foreign national criminal of the week.  You may have read David's detailed Guest Opinion pieces in newspapers across the state.  You may have received or seen posted on our OFIR website, his reports on foreign national criminals held in the Oregon prison system.

David Cross is well known for his accurate, detailed research about foreign national crime and it hasn't gone unnoticed.  The Center for Immigration Studies invited David to attend an immigration briefing at the National Press Club in Washington DC. this past weekend.

Read more about Breitbart's interviews at the event.

 

 


 

Breitbart Reporters Interviewed at Immigration Meeting in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Breitbart Texas team members travelled to the nation’s capital for an immigration briefing hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS). Following a reception featuring Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL), three Breitbart journalists agreed to an interview with Peter “DaTechGuy” Ingemi at The National Press Club.

Breitbart Texas Managing Director Brandon Darby spoke about his focus on border security and the criminal activities of cartels and other border groups...

Darby and Ingemi also discussed human smuggling and human trafficking....

Ingemi also interviewed Breitbart Texas Associate Editor Bob Price. Price discussed the economic, social, and political impact of illegal immigration...

In addition, Price discussed Texans’ concerns about Second Amendment rights in light of the recent ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He addressed the abuse of human smuggling victims at the hands of the drug cartels.

Ingemi also interviewed Breitbart News journalist Patrick Howley. As a reporter covering the 2016 presidential races, Howley discussed the evolution and rise of the populist movement within the Republican presidential primary. “I think Donald Trump has really harnessed this energy and harnessed this spirit of populism more than any politician I’ve ever seen.”

When Howley was being interviewed by the “Da Tech Guy” blogger, Ingemi said he was a “Cruz guy” but added that “the Orlando speech (by Trump) was a game changer.” The two discussed the President’s framing of the attack as a gun issue, down-playing it as a terrorist attack.

Following the reception where Senator Sessions discussed “Immigration in the National Interest,” this writer, along with Darby and Price, joined other Breitbart journalists in attending the CIS immigration briefing held at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. on Friday.

CIS describes itself on its website as “an independent, non-partisan, non-profit, research organization.” They add, “Since our founding in 1985, we have pursued a single mission – providing immigration policymakers, the academic community, news media, and concerned citizens with reliable information about the social, economic, environmental, security, and fiscal consequences of legal and illegal immigration into the United States.”

DaTechGuyBlog.com has been on the list of the top 150 Conservative blog sites for over a year with an Alexa Rank in the top 100,000 worldwide and the top 21,000 nationally. Founded by Peter Ingemi in 2008, the blog site now hosts the “Magnificent Seven Bloggers, (Marathon Pundit, Linda Szugyi, Baldilocks, Fausta, Lady Liberty 1885, Pastor George Kelly & Steve Eggleston).” Follow Ingemi on Twitter @DaTechGuyblog.

Brandon Darby is the founder and managing director of Breitbart Texas. Follow him on Twitter @brandondarby.

https://youtu.be/Z0a8-euwKHY

Bob Price serves as associate editor and senior political news contributor for Breitbart Texas and is a member of the original Breitbart Texas team. Follow him on Twitter @BobPriceBBTX.

https://youtu.be/TJO5I4XCFZg

Patrick Howley is a journalist for Breitbart News based in the Washington, D.C. bureau. Follow him on Twitter @PatrickHowleyDC.

https://youtu.be/K3de6honZDY

Lana Shadwick is a writer and legal analyst for Breitbart Texas. She has served as a prosecutor and associate judge in Texas. Follow her on Twitter @LanaShadwick2.

Criminal immigrants reoffend at higher rates than ICE has suggested

They were among the nation’s top priorities for deportation, criminals who were supposed to be sent back to their home countries. But instead they were released, one by one, in secret across the United States. Federal officials said that many of the criminals posed little threat to the public, but did little to verify whether that was true.

It wasn’t.

A Globe review of 323 criminals released in New England from 2008 to 2012 found that as many as 30 percent committed new offenses, including rape, attempted murder, and child molestation — a rate that is markedly higher than Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials have suggested to Congress in the past.

The names of these criminals have never before been made public and are coming to light now only because the Globe sued the federal government for the list of criminals immigration authorities returned to neighborhoods across the country. A judge ordered the names released in 2013, and the Globe then undertook the work that the federal government didn’t, scouring court records to find out how many released criminals reoffended.

The Globe has also published, in conjunction with this story, a searchable database of the thousands of names that were disclosed to the news organization, so that crime victims, law enforcement officials, and managers of sex offender registries — who are often unaware of these releases — can find out if the criminals may still be in the United States.

The review does not indicate that immigrants are any more likely to commit crimes than native-born Americans — and in fact studies have shown that not to be the case. But the review reveals the damage inflicted on victims by criminals who were ordered to be deported when their sentences were complete, and were not, and it raises questions about how the government handled their cases.

The public rarely learns about ICE’s decisions to release criminals until something goes wrong — because immigration is the only law enforcement system in the United States that keeps such records secret.

ICE maintains that immigration records are generally private, and therefore exempt from disclosure under federal law. But others say the public should know who is making these decisions and why.

“There’s a serious question of who ICE represents. Who do they work for?” said Chester Fairlie, a lawyer for the mother of Casey Chadwick, a Connecticut woman murdered last year by a released criminal — a case that is intensifying calls for reform in ICE. “Public safety should trump any claim of privilege or confidentiality. It doesn’t come from statute. It doesn’t come from law. It comes from ICE deciding that that’s how it’s going to do things.”

Immigration officials have long insisted that the decision to release criminals — some of whom initially came to this country legally — is often out of their hands because the Supreme Court ruled in 2001 that the government cannot jail immigrants indefinitely. If immigration officials cannot deport them after six months, the court said, they should generally set them free.

“So to sit there and say that the proud women and men of law enforcement in ICE are choosing to release criminals is absolutely unforgivable,” ICE Director Sarah Saldaña told the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in April, after lawmakers grilled her about releasing criminals in the United States. “And they do not go around trying to put criminals on the street.”

But often, that’s where they end up.

The Globe found that a Massachusetts man was supposed to be deported after he served jail time for bashing his ex-girlfriend on the head with a hammer — but ICE released him in October 2009. Three months later, he found the ex-girlfriend and stabbed her repeatedly. A Rhode Island man who had served prison time for a home invasion was also released from immigration detention in 2009; five years later, he was arrested for attacking his former girlfriend. In 2010, ICE released a man with a lengthy criminal record in Maine; a few months later he grabbed a man outside a 7-Eleven, held a knife to the man’s throat, and robbed him.

Some members of Congress appear to be losing patience with ICE’s argument that it is powerless to stop these releases. Critics say ICE could seek civil commitment for mentally ill immigrants who commit crimes, arrest reoffenders, and ask the Department of State to use diplomatic means to punish nations such as Haiti, China, and Jamaica when they refuse to take back their own citizens.

At the House oversight hearing on April 28, committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican, said ICE’s decisions to release criminals who can’t be deported are leading to thousands of preventable crimes, according to ICE’s own statistics. The recent reoffenses include more than 130 murders or attempted murders since 2010, according to a letter ICE provided in February to Senator Chuck Grassley, an Iowa Republican who is chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

“What’s going on with Immigration and Customs Enforcement is one of the most infuriating things I think I’ve seen in this government yet,” Chaffetz said. To Saldaña, he added, after referring to crime victims in these cases, “How do you look those people in the eye?”

The Globe’s review was limited to the 323 immigrants released in New England between 2008 and 2012.

To calculate the recidivism rate in New England, the Globe scoured public police logs, Internet databases, and news media reports from Maine to southern Connecticut to identify the courts where criminal convictions occurred. Then the Globe traveled to or called the court houses to request records. The effort took three years, because most courts in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine do not have online databases where the public can search for records.

The public records in criminal courts made it possible to scrutinize an immigration system that rarely opens its files to the public — or even to US lawmakers.

For instance, the public did not know that ICE had struggled to deport Jean Jacques to Haiti in 2012, after he served time for attempted murder in Connecticut. ICE said in an e-mail that the agency repeatedly tried to deport Jacques, but had to release him when Haiti refused to accept him back to his home country. Then in 2015, he fatally stabbed 25-year-old Casey Chadwick of Norwich, Conn., and stuffed her body in a closet. A jury convicted him of murder in April.

Chadwick’s death outraged lawmakers, who said they got few answers from the federal immigration system about the handling of Jacques’ case. Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal and two other Democrats called for an inquiry by Homeland Security’s inspector general.

“It is unacceptable that ICE failed to remove a convicted attempted murderer subject to a final deportation order — a measure that would have saved the life of Casey Chadwick,” Blumenthal and others said in a statement in January. “ICE’s responses thus far to our repeated inquiries into this case have been incomplete and unsatisfactory, and we hope that this independent inquiry will finally uncover the facts surrounding this tragedy, enabling reforms necessary to ensure that this never happens again.”

Clear answers are hard to come by in a system that aggressively keeps its records from the public.

For example, ICE had insisted in court records that reoffenders were “isolated examples.” To Congress, ICE officials suggested that reoffenders were rare, less than 10 percent.

But the reoffender rate among the immigrants on the Globe’s list is clearly much higher, at 30 percent.

Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies for the Center for Immigration Studies, which favors limiting immigration, said she believes the reoffender rate is probably even higher, given the Globe’s limited access to immigrants’ criminal histories. Some names, for instance, were too common to verify against court records. She said the government should track the rate itself.

“This is exactly what the government should be doing to evaluate the impact of its own policy, to make sure that it’s not causing harm,” she said. “They shouldn’t be doing this blindly without taking the time to evaluate the effects of the policy, the public safety consequences.”

Immigration officials acknowledge they have not calculated a recidivism rate, but say they are “working to provide this data.”

“ICE is committed to continually improving the agency’s ability to track and manage ever evolving agency-related data, but the agency does not have statistically reliable information on recidivism rates prior to FY13,” ICE spokesman Shawn Neudauer said in an e-mail.

Immigration officials have also pointed out that they are increasingly focusing on deporting criminals, which they argue is likely to contribute to a lower recidivism rate.

Since 2008, ICE has deported hundreds of thousands of criminals. During the last fiscal year, 59 percent of the immigrants they deported had been convicted of at least one crime. And ICE officials say they are constantly pressing other countries to take back their citizens. Some of the released criminals were later taken back into custody and deported.

But ICE has also released tens of thousands of criminals in the United States — and in far greater numbers than they have disclosed to the Globe.

ICE told the news organization that the agency freed 12,941 criminals nationwide from 2008 to early 2014.

But Saldaña, the ICE director, told the House committee that the agency freed 36,007 criminals in fiscal 2013 alone. They are among 86,288 criminals they released from 2013 to fiscal 2015.

ICE officials said in an e-mail that the agency only provided the Globe the names of criminals they were forced to release under the Supreme Court decision; the additional releases were for other reasons. They did not elaborate, but ICE has told Congress it has also released criminals because of budget constraints, humanitarian reasons, or when an immigration judge ordered a release.

ICE has also suggested in court records that “many” of the criminals they released were traffic violators or other nonviolent offenders. But the news organization’s analysis shows that nationwide, immigration officials freed more convicted killers (201) than traffic violators (116) from 2008 to 2012.

ICE has also told Congress, as recently as May, that just 23 nations were failing to cooperate with deportations.

But ICE records show that as recently as 2016, there were about 140 nations that refused to take back at least some of their citizens, including Armenia, the Bahamas, St. Lucia, and many others.

In New England, about a quarter of the criminals released from 2008 to 2012 were previously convicted of rape, murder, or other violent crimes, based on the criminal histories that ICE provided to the Globe.

Court records show that, for a variety of reasons, some released criminals went on to enjoy privileges that otherwise law-abiding undocumented immigrants usually can’t enjoy, such as obtaining driver’s licenses. Five released criminals were even registered to vote in Massachusetts, putting them in the jury pool. State officials said none had ever voted, and they removed them from the list after being asked about them.

One released criminal thwarted his own deportation three times by kicking and screaming on an airplane bound for his homeland, prompting the pilot to throw him off while they were still on the ground, according to federal court records.

But more troubling are the criminals who left a string of new victims once immigration officials set them free.

In January 2010, a Framingham woman walked out of a Stop & Shop and saw her ex-boyfriend, Oscoe Housen — the same man who had served time for attacking her with a hammer. He was supposed to have been deported to Jamaica, but ICE released him instead.

Early the next morning, Housen broke into the woman’s home and stabbed her and a friend with a large knife as her children slept nearby. Police said they discovered a gruesome scene — the man was bleeding heavily and the woman asked “if she was going to die.” She lived, and Housen, 64, is serving up to 12 years in prison.

ICE also released Nhoeuth Nhim, one of several masked gang members who led a frightening home invasion and robbery in 2000 in Cranston, R.I. The gang used duct tape to bind, gag, and blindfold a family of five, including a 6-year-old. After robbing them of money and jewelry, the gang set a fire in the basement and dragged the family into the flames. The family, hard-working immigrants from Cambodia, all escaped.

After serving prison time, Nhim was supposed to face deportation, but instead ICE released him in 2009 and he returned to Rhode Island, where he later was charged with sexually assaulting his ex-girlfriend. He pleaded no contest to felony assault and is in prison.

In 2009, ICE released Bo Kang Me, a 48-year-old Cambodian immigrant with a long criminal record. He was soon rearrested for new crimes and probation violations. But he was free in 2013 when a Providence school let him pick up a child from school, even though he was not authorized to do so. He molested the child and is serving prison time for second-degree child molestation.

ICE had no comment on the cases, but said, “The decisions made in every case are made with the best available information ICE is able to obtain at the time.”

On April 25, ICE unexpectedly sent the Globe a new list of released criminals that showed that 83 percent of the criminals released nationwide from 2012 to 2016 are convicted felons.

Critics say it’s likely that ICE will continue to release serious criminals in the future, but unless the agency changes its privacy policies, there is no guarantee that the public will ever know.

Timeline of the Globe’s lawsuit

It’s nearly a five-year saga.

Search the Globe’s database of criminals

ICE: A snapshot of released criminals who were supposed to be deported

On April 25, Immigration and Customs Enforcement provided an updated look at the criminals it released in the United States from 2012 to February because the agency was unable to deport them. Typically in these cases, foreign countries refuse to repatriate their citizens. ICE says they are forced to release them in the United States because the Supreme Court has barred the agency from jailing immigrants indefinitely. These are the homelands of the criminals released during this period.

SOURCE: US Immigration and Customs Enforcement   Patrick Garvin/GLOBE STAFF

Jeremy C. Fox of the Globe staff contributed to this report. Maria Sacchetti can be reached at maria.sacchetti@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @mariasacchetti.

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