state legislation

SB 833 - is the Oregon Legislature representing you?

David Cross, heard weekly on the Lars Larson radio show, has written a great opinion piece, published today in the Statesman, that lays out just how citizens were shut out of the legislative process regarding SB 833. 

Even more important however, is how citizens actively responded to being shunned by our elected officials with the referendum petition that was recently verified with an impressive validity rate.

Hopefully, this sends a powerful message to those in the Legislature that choose to pander to illegal alien advocate groups, businesses that rely on illegal alien workers and other special interest groups.

In November, we are confident the message will be even louder!  The citizens of Oregon expect Legislators to work for the best interests of Oregon and her legal residents!
 

Referendum approval draws support

The Bend Bulletin published a great editorial about SB 833 and their support of the referendum process.  They agree that citizens should have the right to vote - and overturn - the new law giving driver cards to illegal aliens.

 

Coming soon...

Alert date: 
2013-10-22
Alert body: 

OFIR and PODL would like to thank all of our wonderful volunteers, donors and supporters that helped us throughout the summer as we worked diligently on the referendum petition to get SB 833 on the ballot.  Our success is sweet! 

Now, we take a deep breath and begin preparing for the upcoming campaign.  We hope that each and every one of you will, once again, be by our side as we head toward the November 2014 election.

The Protect Oregon Driver License website will be going through a metamorphosis over the next few weeks as it transforms from a signature gathering website into a campaign website loaded with ideas about how you can help with the upcoming campaign. 

OFIR and PODL extends a great big thank you to Fred Elbel, our talented web designer.

The PODL website generated more single signer signature sheets than any initiative or referendum campaign in Oregon history.  We collected over 10,700 e-sheets just from our website.
 

Driver cards referendum qualifies for 2014 ballot

Members of the group Oregonians for Immigration Reform were quietly celebrating Friday after learning that the Oregon Secretary of State’s office had officially qualified Referendum No. 301 for the November 2014 ballot.

The OFIR group believes residents, not lawmakers, should decide whether the state should issue driver-privilege cards to individuals without required documentation such as a U.S. birth certificate or U.S. passport.

Gov. John Kitzhaber signed Senate Bill 833 into law in May after a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers and interested parties joined forces to create safer roads. The bill authorized the issuance of driver-privilege cards beginning in January, but the referendum’s qualification means the new law won’t go into effect as planned.

Cynthia Kendoll, president of OFIR, said she was pleased with the outcome of the process. She said volunteers had only a few months to gather signatures, and worked diligently to ensure that the people of Oregon would have a say on what OFIR believes is de facto immigration policy.

The group turned in 71,000 signatures gathered throughout the summer during drive-through efforts and at places such as the Capitol building steps, the state fair and Center 50+.

“We are delighted,” Kendoll said. “We really turned in the valedictorian of signature-gathering efforts. We passed with the first sample, which is terrific. It was so clean – they didn’t find any duplicate signatures in the sample.”

Summer Davis, compliance specialist with the Elections Division of the Secretary of State’s office, and Tony Green, a spokesman for Secretary of State Kate Brown, confirmed that many ballot measures that go on to qualify for the ballot often don’t succeed on the first sample, which contains 1,000 signatures.

Jeff Stone, executive director of the Oregon Association of Nurseries, which was part of the coalition that helped pass SB-833, said the qualification wasn’t exactly a surprise.

He predicted that the faith communities, law enforcement agencies and farming communities that worked together with lawmakers in a bipartisan fashion to pass this year’s bill, would rally to help pass the referendum. As No. 301 is written, if residents vote “yes” on the referendum, the law created by SB-833 will go into effect 30 days after the election next year. If voters reject the referendum, driver privilege cards will not be issued in Oregon.

“My hope is that these groups will provide volunteers and thoughtful leaders who offer rational conversation, and that they will help put together a good communications plan to help Oregon make a sensible decision and see this referendum for what it is,” Stone said. “I do know the nursery and greenhouse industries will vigorously defend this good piece (SB-833) of public-safety legislation.”
 

DMV suspends Driver Card program pending vote

DMV has suspended implementation of the Driver Card program pending the outcome of a statewide referendum vote in the November 2014 election.
 
The Oregon Secretary of State’s Office announced Oct. 18 that a referendum on Senate Bill 833 has qualified for the ballot, so the law will not go into effect as scheduled.
 
“If the results of the election reverse the legislation, DMV will cancel all work on the Driver Card program,” DMV Administrator Tom McClellan said. “If the election upholds the legislation, DMV will launch the Driver Card program 30 days after the results are official.”
 
Senate Bill 833, passed by the 2013 Oregon Legislature, provides driving privileges to people who meet all requirements of a regular driver license but cannot prove they are lawfully present in the United States.
 
“DMV does not take a position in elections or legislation,” McClellan noted. “Our role is to implement Oregon driver and vehicle laws as efficiently and effectively as possible.”
 
For all customers, DMV suggests that you first check www.OregonDMV.com before visiting a field office in person. Customers can complete some DMV business online or find out how to make their visit as efficient as possible.
 

Oregon driver card bill headed to the November 2014 ballot

Voters will weigh in next year on a bill granting “driver’s cards” to Oregonians unable to prove they are in the U.S. legally.

The Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 833 earlier this year, but opponents, led by Oregonians for Immigration Reform and Protect Oregon Driver Licenses, vowed to refer it to the ballot, hoping voters would overturn the law.

Read more about the successful SB 833 referendum petition campaign.
 

Referendum petition signature campaign approved for Nov. 2014 ballot

Alert date: 
2013-10-18
Alert body: 

OFIR/PODL is thrilled to announce that the referendum petition to place SB 833 on the November 2014 ballot has been approved by the Secretary of State's office.

A great big thank you to everyone who worked so hard to gather signatures.  we certainly couldn't have done it without you!

Read about the SB 833 referendum petition approval.

Secretary of State's office begins final verification procedure

Alert date: 
2013-10-16
Alert body: 

Protect Oregon Driver Licenses has submitted 71,000 signatures (58,142 were required) by the deadline of October 4.  The referendum petition #301, if approved, will place the new law granting driver cards to illegal aliens on the ballot in the November 2014 election.

The Secretary of State's office has 30 days to scrutinize the signatures for validity and to be certain that all signature sheets are signed, numbered properly and have no mistakes.  It is tedious work and PODL appreciates the professionalism and willingness to answer the questions of those observing the procedure.

Starting Thursday, we will begin the final phase of the approval process.  Please watch for updates.  As soon as we have confirmation that the referendum has been approved, we will post the good news.

 

 

Petition effort may stall immigrant driving law

State Rep. Sal Esquivel said he expects voters will get a chance to determine if a new law should allow illegal immigrants to have driver's licenses.

Esquivel, a member of Oregonians for Immigration Reform, co-sponsored a referendum for the November 2014 ballot that seeks to overturn a law authorizing driver-privilege cards for non-legal residents.

"I think the people of Oregon should weigh in on it because they will be driving around with those people," said Esquivel, R-Medford.

Critics of the new law, which was set to go into effect in January, submitted 71,000 signatures to the Secretary of State's office this week in hopes of putting the issue to a vote in November of 2014.

Esquivel disputed the argument that the law will make the highways safer because illegal immigrants will follow through on the requirement to get auto insurance along with a driver's license.

"You break the law to come here," he said. "Why do you think they would follow the law and get insurance?"

The Secretary of State's Election Office will scrutinize the petitions submitted by the group Oregonians for Immigration Reform and the paid private firm Signature Gathering Company of Oregon.

The OFIR group was required to submit 58,142 valid signatures to qualify its referendum for the November 2014 ballot. Group members say voters should have the final say on whether the state issues driver's cards to people who cannot produce documents proving they are U.S. citizens.

If the petitioners succeed in getting on the November 2014 ballot, the law would not take effect in January.

Monitors from both OFIR and immigrants' rights groups such as CAUSA Oregon will be on hand to witness the elections staff as they review the signatures.

Supporters of the driver's privilege law say they don't see the law as an immigration issue, but believe it makes the roads safer for all Oregonians.

Ron Louis, a 33-year veteran of law enforcement and retired chief of police in Hillsboro, told the Salem Statesman-Journal that he views the cards as a matter of public safety and points to their success in other states such as Maryland, New Mexico, Utah and Washington as evidence.

"It just allows anyone without the typical documentation to drive and get insurance. And it puts them through a testing process that hopefully makes them safer driver," Louis said. "It ensures that they minimally understand rules and road signs, and I'd much rather have every driver alongside me have this education."

But others say the decision to grant driver's cards to individuals is closely related to immigration concerns.

Lake Oswego resident Colleen Hill said in the same Statesman-Journal story that it was "very disturbing that the governor was validating illegal behavior" and said the decision would give illegal immigrants "documentation to citizenship."

Gov. John Kitzhaber signed Senate Bill 833, creating the driver's card option, into law in May.

Reach reporter Damian Mann at 541-776-4476 or dmann@mailtribune.com.


 

Driver's card issue now a waiting game

For a litany of volunteers, this was a week of hopes realized and hopes dashed.

On Monday, the Secretary of State’s Election Office began scrutinizing referendum petitions submitted by the group Oregonians for Immigration Reform and the paid private firm Signature Gathering Company of Oregon.

The OFIR group hopes to have collected 58,142 valid signatures to qualify Referendum No. 301 for the November 2014 ballot. It believes residents, not lawmakers, should decide whether the state should issue driver-privilege cards to individuals without DMV-required documentation, such as a birth certificate or passport. Gov. John Kitzhaber signed Senate Bill 833 in May, which authorizes the issuance of driver’s-privilege cards beginning in January.

OFIR had volunteers witness the elections staff as it started the certification process. The elections office accepted the petitions Oct. 4 and has 30 days to determine whether a representative sample validates the referendum for next year’s ballot. It is too early to know if the group has enough valid signatures, but its president, Cynthia Kendoll, believes it does because more than half of the petitions are “e-sheets,” or single-signature pages printed out by the voter, signed and then mailed back to the group.

Volunteers from other groups such as CAUSA Oregon and the Oregon Safe Roads Coalition also observed the election office staff at work. These groups had individuals on hand to ensure that the signature-vetting process was handled correctly because they hope the petition for the referendum fails to qualify for the ballot.

They had previously welcomed the governor’s signature on SB 833.

Many of these individuals don’t see the issue as a de facto immigration policy, but believe it makes the roads safer for all Oregonians.

Ron Louis, a 33-year veteran of law enforcement and retired chief of police in Hillsboro, doesn’t want to wade into the immigration debate. He doesn’t believe the driver-privilege card is an inroad to granting anyone in the country illegally the rights afforded U.S. citizens. He views the cards as a matter of public safety, and he points to their success in other states such as Maryland, New Mexico, Utah and Washington as validation for his point of view.

“It just allows anyone without the typical documentation to drive and get insurance. And it puts them through a testing process that hopefully makes them safer driver,” Louis said. “It ensures that they minimally understand rules and road signs, and I’d much rather have every driver alongside me have this education.”

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - state legislation