Mexico

Report: Nearly 20 Percent of Inmates in Federal Prisons Are Criminal Aliens

According to a  new report, criminal aliens currently make up nearly 20 percent of the population in the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) system -- a total of 34,776.

David Olen Cross, a Salem, Ore., crime and immigration researcher, looked at the number of foreign nationals in the U.S. BOP system based on the most recent federal report. As of March 30, 2019, there were 179,761 inmates incarcerated in federal prisons across the U.S. Their countries of origin, according to the report, are:

• Mexico 21,668 inmates, 12.1 percent;

• Colombia 1,633 inmates, 0.9 percent;

• Dominican Republic 1,425 inmates, 0.8 percent;

• Cuba 1,169 inmates, 0.7 percent;

• Other/unknown countries 8,881 inmates, 4.9 percent;

• United States 144,985 inmates, 80.7 percent;

Cross, who researches and reports on foreign national crime, said in a press release on Sunday, "Combining March 30th BOP criminal alien inmate numbers, there were 34,776 criminal aliens in the BOP prison system," down slightly from June 2018, when there were just over 38,000. Still, alien inmates make up 19.3 percent of the federal prison population.

Cross added that the 21,668 Mexican nationals incarcerated in the BOP prison system comprise "the vast majority of criminal aliens in federal prisons."

A June 2018 Quarterly Alien Incarceration report from the Department of Justice found:

A total of 57,820 known or suspected aliens were in in DOJ custody at the end of FY 2018 Q1, including 38,132 persons in BOP custody and 19,688 in USMS [U.S. Marshalls Service] custody. Of this total, 42,284 people had been confirmed by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to be aliens (i.e., non-citizens and non-nationals), while 15,536 aliens were still under investigation by ICE to determine alienage and/or removability.

Among the 42,284 confirmed aliens, 39,413 people (93 percent) were unlawfully present. These numbers include a 62 percent unlawful rate among 38,132 known or suspected aliens in BOP custody and a 78 percent unlawful rate among 19,688 confirmed aliens in USMS custody.

Approximately 16,233 aliens in USMS custody required housing in state, local, and private facilities, which cost $1,458,372.72 a day.

Note that the cost number is only for criminal aliens housed in U.S. Marshals Service facilities -- it does not include the 34,776 incarcerated in BOP facilities, nor those in custody at state and local facilities.

Cross notes that the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons breaks down the prison population into 13 types of offenses, with immigration crimes accounting for only 6.5 percent of the federal prison population -- a total of 10,826 inmates. In other words, only one in three criminal alien inmates housed in the BOP system is incarcerated as a result of immigration crimes.

The DOJ report tabulated BOP statistics from the first quarter of 2018, noting that nearly half (46 percent) were incarcerated as the results of drug trafficking or other drug-related offenses. But the incarcerations were not limited to drug crimes, as this chart from the DOJ shows:

These numbers do not include known or suspected criminal aliens being held by the U.S. Marshals Service or in state and local facilities.

The 2018 DOJ report cited examples of newly incarcerated or sentenced BOP inmates:

• Anibel Rondolpho Rodriguez, an illegal alien from Honduras who was residing in Freeport, NY, was sentenced to 45 years in prison after he pled guilty to racketeering charges, two murder conspiracies, two attempted murders, and threatening to commit assault.

• Eduardo Martinez, an illegal alien who was residing in Fort Wayne, Indiana, was sentenced to 324 months in prison after he pled guilty to possession with intent to distribute more than a kilogram of heroin, distribution of over 50 grams of methamphetamine, and possession of a firearm.

• Pedro Quintero-Enriques, an illegal alien from Mexico who was residing in Summerdale, Alabama, was sentenced to 108 months in prison after he pled guilty to illegal reentry after deportation and felon in possession of firearms.

Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at the time the report was issued, "The illegal immigrant crime rate in this country should be zero." He added, "Every crime committed by an illegal alien is, by definition, a crime that should have been prevented. It is outrageous that tens of thousands of Americans are dying every year because of the drugs and violence brought over our borders illegally and that taxpayers have been forced, year after year, to pay millions of dollars to incarcerate tens of thousands of illegal aliens."

Border Patrol union chief tells how to break log-jam of asylum seekers

Brandon Judd, president of National Border Patrol Council, the union that represents the agents and support staff of the U.S. Border Patrol, presents a great idea for changes that would simplify and restore control of the border.  He recommends that DHS cross-designate and train Border Patrol agents at the senior patrol agent level as asylum officers with limited authority to conduct “credible fear” interviews.

As he explains: “Asylum and deportation proceedings are civil administration actions, not criminal. Therefore, DHS has the right to establish fear thresholds. Unlike in a criminal proceeding, where the government must prove its case, the burden of proof falls on the illegal border-crosser to provide proof establishing a credible fear.

“If the ‘credible fear’ process begins upon arrest by Border Patrol agents, instead of at a later interview before an asylum officer, the process will be much more efficient. If an asylum-trained senior patrol agent determines that the alien has not established a credible fear, an order of expedited removal can be issued, and the illegal border-crosser can be removed immediately. The illegal border-crosser does have appeal rights, but by regulation an immigration judge must hear the case within 10 days of the person asking for reconsideration. Again, because this is not a criminal proceeding, the burden of proof remains on the illegal border-crosser, not the U.S. government.

“If no credible fear is established, the process would take no more than 10 days instead of the 2 to 5 years it now takes to deport an illegal border-crosser who claims asylum. This simple adjustment would end catch-and-release. …”

Read the full article here.  It was published as an analysis/opinion in The Washington Times, Sunday, March 31, 2019.  

Another good discussion goes into more detail: “Top border agent: We don’t need Congress to stop mass migration,” by Daniel Horowitz in The Conservative Review, April 3, 2019.  See it here.

According to an April 4 blog from NumbersUSA, the DHS has recently begun some use of the approach described by Brandon Judd.

You can contact The White House and urge Pres. Trump to have DHS deputize sufficient numbers of its senior Border Patrol officers to act as asylum adjudicators, and stop use of the ineffective catch-and-release procedures.  Email:  https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/

Illegal Aliens Go for a Windfall

WASHINGTON  Two families of illegal aliens from Central America are suing Trump administration officials in a Massachusetts federal district court over their treatment after they crossed the border illegally. The families claim that the month-long separation of the parents from their children when the parents were in jail for a criminal offense violated their constitutional rights. They seek monetary damages from the defendants, who are being sued as individuals, not in their official capacities. The Immigration Reform Law Institute (IRLI) this week filed a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the Trump officials.

The government’s brief on its motion to dismiss does an excellent job of showing that the court lacks personal jurisdiction over the defendants (none of whom has substantial personal contacts with Massachusetts), and that a damages action of this kind is unwarranted here. IRLI adds to these persuasive arguments a further point: plaintiffs had never even entered the country in a legal sense when their separations occurred, and thus they had no rights under our Constitution to be deprived of.

In immigration law, “entry” is a term of art, generally defined as presence in this country and freedom from official restraint. For example, a traveler at an American airport waiting to go through customs has not “entered” the United States. And a basic principle of constitutional law is that it is the American people" not aliens who have never entered the country in a legal sense, and have no substantial connection to it "who have rights under our Constituution.

Here, the alien families sought out border patrol agents as soon as they crossed the border, intending to claim asylum. When the parents were taken into custody for the crime of unlawful entry, pursuant to the administration’s zero tolerance policy, their children, who could not accompany them into jail, were placed with caregivers for about a month, after which the families were reunited. Thus, according to the leading legal definition of “entry,” the families had never effected entry into the U.S. - and thus had not come under the protection of ouur Constitution.

“This audacious lawsuit richly deserves to be dismissed,” commented Dale L. Wilcox, executive director and general counsel of IRLI. “These parents could have avoided detention and separation from their children altogether by voluntarily leaving the country. But that didn’t suit their purposes. Then, after the separation they caused was over, they turned around and sued government officials over it, hoping for a windfall for themselves and their attorneys.”

The case is K.O. v. Sessions, No. 4:18-cv-40149 (D. Mass.).

Share this release here.  


For additional information, contact: Brian Lonergan � 202-232-5590 � blonergan@irli.org

Oregon Department of Corrections: Mexican National Crime Report February 2019

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on February 1, 2019 that 730 of the 913 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were Mexican nationals — 79.96 percent of the criminal alien prison population (Note: The number of Mexican nationals incarcerated in DOC prisons does not necessarily equal the number of Oregon residents victimized by this specific group of criminal aliens).

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on February 1st in the state’s prisons who declared themselves as being Mexican nationals.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

February 1, 2019

913

730

79.96%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 19.

Mexican (MEX) national criminals were sent to DOC prisons from 27 of 36 Oregon counties — 75.00 percent of the counties in the state.

Seven Oregon counties, Marion (195 MEX inmates), Washington (146 MEX inmates), Multnomah (114 MEX inmates), Clackamas (64 MEX inmates), Lane (33 MEX inmates), Jackson (31 MEX inmates) and Umatilla (24 MEX inmates) had 607 of the 730 Mexican national inmates incarcerated in DOC prisons — 83.15 percent of the MEX inmates.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on February 1st that were sent  to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ICE Detainers

Marion

195

26.71%

Washington

146

20.00%

Multnomah

114

15.62%

Clackamas

64

8.77%

Lane

33

4.52%

Jackson

31

4.25%

Umatilla

24

3.29%

Yamhill

20

2.74%

Linn

16

2.19%

Polk

12

1.64%

Benton

10

1.37%

Klamath

10

1.37%

Deschutes

9

1.23%

Malheur

9

1.23%

Jefferson

6

0.82%

Douglas

4

0.55%

Lincoln

4

0.55%

Tillamook

4

0.55%

Wasco

4

0.55%

Clatsop

3

0.41%

Coos

3

0.41%

Hood River

3

0.41%

Josephine

2

0.27%

Crook

1

0.14%

Gilliam

1

0.14%

Lake

1

0.14%

Morrow

1

0.14%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

730

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 19.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 730 Mexican national criminals.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on February 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

166

22.74%

Rape

138

18.90%

Homicide

102

13.97%

Sodomy

77

10.55%

Drugs

72

9.86%

Assault

57

7.81%

Robbery

28

3.84%

Kidnapping

18

2.47%

Burglary

14

1.92%

Theft

5

0.68%

Driving Offense

3

0.41%

Vehicle Theft

2

0.27%

Arson

1

0.14%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

47

6.44%

Total

730

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 19.

Using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from February 1st, the following table reveals the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated by type of crime, the number of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Number of Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

190

166

87.37%

Rape

170

138

81.18%

Homicide

132

102

77.27%

Sodomy

98

77

78.57%

Assault

79

57

72.15%

Drugs

77

72

93.51%

Robbery

43

28

65.12%

Kidnapping

27

18

66.67%

Burglary

22

14

63.64%

Theft

15

5

33.33%

Vehicle Theft

4

2

50.00%

Driving Offense

4

3

75.00%

Arson

1

1

100.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

51

47

92.16%

Total

913

730

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 February 19.

Beyond the DOC Mexican national incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per type of crime, criminal aliens from Mexico place a substantial economic burden on Oregonians.

An individual inmate incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($108.26) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for 730 Mexican national inmates is approximately ($79,029.80) per day, ($553,208.60) per week, and ($28,845,877.00) per year.

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 730 Mexican national inmates includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography:

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated February 1, 2019.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, September 2018:
https://www.oregon.gov/doc/Documents/agency-quick-facts.pdf

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.
 

USBP Agents Arrest Previously Removed Rapist

TUCSON, Ariz. – Tucson Sector Border Patrol Agents apprehended a previously deported Mexican national with a violent criminal history after he entered the U.S. illegally Thursday morning east of Nogales.

During processing, agents conducting a records check on 38-year-old Juan Maldonado-Martinez discovered his Oregon convictions for rape in the third degree in 2003 and forgery in the first degree in 2004.

Maldonado will remain in federal custody to face felony immigration prosecution.

All persons apprehended by the Border Patrol undergo criminal history checks using biometrics to ensure illegal aliens with criminal histories are positively identified.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Mexican National Crime Report January 2019

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on January 1, 2019 that 726 of the 909 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were Mexican nationals — 79.87 percent of the criminal alien prison population (Note: The number of Mexican nationals incarcerated in DOC prisons does not necessarily equal the number of Oregon residents victimized by this specific group of criminal aliens).

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on January 1st in the state’s prisons who declared themselves as being Mexican nationals.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates W/ICE Detainers

January 1, 2019

909

726

79.87%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Mexican (MEX) national criminals were sent to DOC prisons from 27 of 36 Oregon counties —75.00 percent of the counties in the state.

Seven Oregon counties, Marion (192 MEX inmates), Washington (148 MEX inmates), Multnomah (114 MEX inmates), Clackamas (63 MEX inmates), Lane (33 MEX inmates), Jackson (28 MEX inmates) and Umatilla (24 MEX inmates) had 602 of the 726 Mexican national inmates incarcerated in DOC prisons — 82.92 percent of the MEX inmates.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on January 1st that were sent  to prison from the state’s 36 counties.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by County W/ICE Detainers

Marion

192

26.45%

Washington

148

20.39%

Multnomah

114

15.70%

Clackamas

63

8.68%

Lane

33

4.55%

Jackson

28

3.86%

Umatilla

24

3.31%

Yamhill

19

2.62%

Linn

16

2.20%

Polk

12

1.65%

Deschutes

11

1.52%

Benton

10

1.38%

Klamath

10

1.38%

Malheur

9

1.24%

Jefferson

6

0.83%

Wasco

5

0.69%

Douglas

4

0.55%

Lincoln

4

0.55%

Tillamook

4

0.55%

Clatsop

3

0.41%

Coos

3

0.41%

Hood River

2

0.28%

Josephine

2

0.28%

Crook

1

0.14%

Gilliam

1

0.14%

Lake

1

0.14%

Morrow

1

0.14%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

726

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 726 Mexican national criminals.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated on January 1st by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

166

22.87%

Rape

137

18.87%

Homicide

101

13.91%

Sodomy

78

10.74%

Drugs

72

9.92%

Assault

54

7.74%

Robbery

30

4.13%

Kidnapping

18

2.48%

Burglary

13

1.79%

Theft

5

0.69%

Driving Offense

3

0.41%

Vehicle Theft

2

0.28%

Arson

1

0.14%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

46

6.34%

Total

726

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from January 1st, the following table reveals the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated by type of crime, the number of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of Mexican national inmates incarcerated by type of crime.

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Number of Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ ICE Detainers

DOC Percent of Mexican National Inmates by Type of Crime W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

189

166

87.83%

Rape

169

137

81.07%

Homicide

131

101

77.10%

Sodomy

99

78

78.79%

Drugs

77

72

93.51%

Assault

75

54

72.00%

Robbery

46

30

65.22%

Kidnapping

27

18

66.67%

Burglary

23

13

56.52%

Theft

14

5

35.71%

Vehicle Theft

4

2

50.00%

Driving Offense

3

3

100.00%

Arson

1

1

100.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Comb. Crimes

51

46

90.20%

Total

909

726

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 19.

Beyond the DOC Mexican national incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per type of crime, criminal aliens from Mexico place a substantial economic burden on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($108.26) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for 726 Mexican national inmates is approximately ($78,596.76) per day, ($550,177.32) per week, and ($28,687,817.40) per year.

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 726 Mexican national inmates includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography:

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated January 1, 2019.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, February 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon is crime researcher who writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. The preceding report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com. His past crime reports can be found at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/.

Crunching the numbers on homicidal crimes of illegals

SALEM, Oregon – Based on statistics from the Oregon Department of Corrections and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, there are 909 inmates in the prison system that have ICE detainers. Of those, 131 have committed homicidal crimes like murder, manslaughter, and attempted murder.

David Olen Cross, who researches and reports on immigration issues, says his analysis shows that nine of those cases were tried in Umatilla County. That makes it the fourth highest in the state for homicidal cases involving illegal aliens.

The top three counties dwarf Umatilla County’s single-digit number. Multnomah County had 35, Marion County 22, and Washington County has 21 inmates. Other Eastern Oregon counties had none.

The inmates convicted of homicidal crimes come from 19 different countries. Foreign nationals who declared their homeland to be Mexico committed 101, which is 77.10 percent of the 131 inmates with detainers convicted of homicidal crimes.
 

Mexico's dispersal of latest caravan simply frees migrants to cross the U.S. border less visibly

A CIS visit to the improvised caravan migrant shelter at Piedras Negras, Mexico

PIEDRAS NEGRAS, Mexico, February 18, 2019 — Inside the sprawling ceramics factory where the Mexican government has detained the latest migrant caravan, a process is underway virtually guaranteeing that almost everyone here will soon be granted exactly what they came for: an opportunity to breach the U.S. southern border, exploit the American catch-and-release loophole by claiming asylum, and add themselves to the millions already living in the country illegally.

This caravan of some 2,000 mostly Hondurans, with a smattering of Salvadorans and Guatemalans, began arriving on February 8, but was unable to rush the American border en masse because the Mexican government detained them all first in the Piedras Negras ceramics factory, surrounding it with troops and state and local police forces. Preventing a mass swim across the Rio Grande, that would have been covered by international media, may have improved political optics for both the Mexicans and the Americans, and the state of Coahuila announced that it will close the improvised shelter sometime this week after several riots and disturbances by those demanding release to the U.S. border.

However, the process that will enable Mexico to accomplish such a quick shelter closure portends an unseen, very different outcome than the one intended by U.S. administration officials and current immigration policy. The process also portends precisely the outcome sought by everyone in this caravan and in any future ones. Under the auspices of a special visa program, Mexico is essentially dispersing the migrants around northern Mexico where they will be free to try their luck crossing other parts of the American southern border and to then access the much-prized American catch-and-release loophole they have always sought, though in smaller, less visible-groups.

In one section of the Piedras Negras camp last Thursday, CIS observed hundreds of migrants waiting in line to apply for special Mexican work visas of a year duration. At the same time, in another area of the camp, hundreds more migrants with those visas freshly in hand gathered as Mexican immigration officials called out the names of the 100-applicant groups that will be put on at least one waiting bus to some other Mexican city, such as Monterrey or Hermosillo, ostensibly to live and work for the year. And in a third area is the line to board the big, sleek bus parked inside the factory with a hand-written sign on the door that reads: "Salida Monterrey".

It is through this process that the caravan population is being inexorably reduced each day and dispersed in small groups to other parts of northern Mexico.

...

 [To see this entire, detailed, article online and view the numerous colored photographs of people and places mentioned, click here:  https://cis.org/Bensman/Mexicos-Dispersal-Latest-Caravan-Simply-Frees-Migrants-Cross-US-Border-Less-Visibly]

Swamp Swallows Trump

By Joe Guzzardi

President Trump wants more people to come to the United States! With my own two ears, I heard the President say on back-to-back days that he wants historically high immigration levels, and more people that he foolishly claims “we need.”

Since President Trump was referring to more legal immigration, one could be forgiven for thinking that he had never heard of chain migration where eventually one legal immigrant petitions an average of 3.5 family members to come to the U.S. But analysts who follow and study the nation’s suicidal immigration laws and their loopholes know that President Trump is fully aware of chain migration and its consequences.

Last year, in his State of the Union address, Trump touted ending chain migration. At various times in 2018 he enthusiastically supported Reforming American Immigration for a Stronger Economy (RAISE), legislation from senators Tom Cotton (R-AR) and David Purdue (R-GA), that favored skill-based over the current family-based immigration which drives more than 75 percent of the nation’s population growth. Assuming the status quo continues, by 2065, America will see an increase in population from today’s 328 million to more than 400 million.

Ignore for the moment the effect adding more work-authorized immigrants has on job competition and stagnant wages, and concentrate on the practical significance of adding ever-more people to the ever-swelling population of our country. Of course, adding more and more people to an already overpopulated country is something that apparently neither President Trump, nor private citizen Trump, has a clue about.

Whether President Trump is in the White House, Trump Tower or Mar-a-Lago, he’s isolated from the everyday reality of getting from one place to another. Among the many headaches the President doesn’t endure that are all too familiar to the rest of us are paralyzing Beltway traffic jams, maddening Florida I-95 traffic jams, and the stifling, undependable DC Metro or NYC Subway. President Trump will never be forced to, as I recently was, make a half-mile sprint and then jump on a tram through the sprawling Minneapolis/St. Paul Airport, carry-on luggage in hand, in a failed and frustrating effort to make my connecting flight.

When Trump returns to private citizen status, he will travel on his personal 757 equipped with 24-karat gold seat belts, the $100 million T-Bird as he lovingly calls his jumbo jet. In American presidential history, President Trump is the only office holder for which Air Force One represents a downgrade. For those shorter jaunts, the President owns a $7 million Sikorsky S-76 helicopter. The President sails through city streets preceded by a Secret Service manned motorcade.

But for most of us, more people means we’ll have to deal with more cars and buses that will hit the road, generating more traffic and inevitably more sprawl. Hard to believe though it is, air travel will become more uncomfortable as airports expand, and airline manufacturers produce larger seating capacity commercial jets.

On immigration and specifically on more immigration, President Trump is rejecting Americans’ wishes. A survey of 1,000 voters after the 2018 mid-term election found that 53 percent want to reduce legal immigration from its annual level of more than 1 million, while only 30 percent of voters want immigration increases.

With President Trump’s promotion of more immigration to grow our population even larger, it appears the Swamp has swallowed whole the country’s Chief Executive.

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Joe Guzzardi

Joe Guzzardi is a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist who writes about immigration and related social issues. Joe joined Progressives for Immigration Reform in 2018 as an analyst after a ten-year career directing media relations for Californians for Population Stabilization, where he also was a Senior Writing Fellow. A native Californian, Joe now lives in Pennsylvania. Contact him at jguzzardi@pfirdc.org

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CBP officers seize largest amount of fentanyl in history

TUCSON, Ariz. - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Nogales Commercial Facility seized nearly $4.6 million in fentanyl and methamphetamine totaling close to 650 pounds on Saturday from a Mexican national when he attempted to enter the United States through the Port of Nogales. The seizure is the largest seizure of fentanyl in CBP history. The methamphetamine seizure represents the third largest at an Arizona port. 
 
CBP Officers discovered more than 400 packages of drugs concealed within a special floor compartment of a trailer that was laden with cucumbers, driven by a 26-year-old truck driver. Following an alert by a CBP narcotics detection canine, CBP officers seized nearly 254 pounds of fentanyl with a value of approximately $3.5 million and almost 395 pounds of methamphetamine valued at $1.1 million. 
 
Nogales Area Port Director Michael Humphries praised his staff at the Mariposa Commercial Facility for this record breaking drug seizure and arrest.
 
 “I want to express my gratitude to the CBP officers involved in this case and Nogales personnel who selflessly perform their duties with dedication, vigilance, and professional even during a funding hiatus,” said PD Humphries. “Opioids pose a real danger to every community in America and are having fatal consequences across our nation. This past weekend our CBP officers were able to stop an enormous amount of these deadly narcotics from hitting our streets.”
 
The driver of the vehicle was arrested and turned over to Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), who charged him with two counts of 21 USC 841, possession with intent to distribute and is currently in federal custody.
 
“This case clearly shows that HSI’s and CBP’s collaborative efforts continue to have an impact, as those attempting to smuggle illicit drugs are stopped at the border,” said HSI Special Agent in Charge Scott Brown. “These efforts exhibit the combined resources of law enforcement agencies’ resolve to combating these deadly drugs from entering our communities.”
 

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