Oregon legislation

'No' to Driving Privileges for Illegal Aliens

WASHINGTON - The Immigration Reform Law Institute (IRLI) marked a victory after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld a district court decision to dismiss a case that sought to force the State of Oregon to grant driving privileges to illegal aliens.

IRLI had filed a friend-of-the-court brief in 2016 on behalf of its client Oregonians for Immigration Reform (OFIR) in the case of M.S. v. Brown, in which plaintiffs looked to overturn as unconstitutional the outcome of the November 2014 general election in Oregon. Through the Oregon Constitution’s referendum veto process, Oregon voters overwhelmingly rejected, by 66%, a bill passed by the he legislature and signed by the governor that would have extended eligibility for driving privileges to unlawfully present persons. OFIR was the driving force behind the referendum veto that collected the requisite number of signatures to get the issue placed on the ballot.

The case, brought by five admitted illegal aliens and two illegal alien special interest groups, was dismissed in May 2016 when an Oregon district court ruled that the plaintiffs could not show that an order from the court could redress their complaint as the court had no power to overturn a referendum or force the state to pass legislation giving illegal aliens driving privileges. In its brief, IRLI agreed with the district court and argued further that the plaintiffs also failed to demonstrate an injury, a necessary element of standing to sue, as illegal aliens have no constitutional right to driving privileges, and, in fact, do not even possess the constitutional right to interstate travel (which citizens and legal aliens possess) as a result of their illegal presence in the U.S.

There are a number of reasons why granting driving privileges to illegal aliens is not in the interests of states or their citizens. Among them, states have a legitimate interest in limiting their finite resources to citizens and legal aliens and in not allowing their government machinery to be a facilitator for the concealment of illegal aliens. There is also a legitimate concern that persons subject to immediate or subsequent deportation will not be financially responsible for property damage or personal injury due to automobile accidents. Finally, granting driving privileges to illegal aliens harms national security because, unlike legal aliens, illegal aliens have not undergone background checks or face-to-face interviews to determine whether they pose a national security threat.

“This is a tremendous win for residents of Oregon and the American people at large,” said Dale L. Wilcox, IRLI’s executive director and general counsel. “Since the presence of illegal aliens in the United States is a violation of federal law, the notion that those aliens should be granted the privilege to drive and the right to travel freely throughout the country is absurd. The result of this decision will be safer communities that better serve the interests of their citizens and legal residents.” 

GREAT News - the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirms our stunning victory on Measure 88

Alert date: 
2018-09-05
Alert body: 

We just learned from our attorneys that the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied the lawsuit against our victory in 2014 to overturn driver cards for illegal aliens - Measure 88.
 

Five self-identified, alleged illegal aliens filed a federal lawsuit against the state of Oregon for allowing the will of Oregon voters to overturn the bill giving an official Oregon driver card to illegal aliens. The bill that Measure 88 overturned was Senate Bill 833 which had passed both chambers of the State Legislature and was signed by Governor Kitzhaber with great fanfare on the steps of the Capitol before a large crowd on May Day, May 1. 2013.
 
The vast majority of voters understood the implications of giving an official state-issued, photo ID, in the form of a driver card to individuals who could not prove they are legally in the country, and they DEFEATED Measure 88, expressing their disapproval of Senate Bill 833.
 
For the record, Measure 88 was defeated by 66 percent of Oregon voters. Close to one million Oregonians voted against driver cards. Thirty-five of Oregon’s 36 counties voted it down. Eighteen counties voted by over 80 percent against it. Measure 88 lost in all five of Oregon’s congressional districts. A majority of Oregon Democrats, Republicans and independents voted against issuing driver cards to illegal aliens.
 
Our opponents outspent us roughly ten to one. One Hollywood TV star, gave a $50,000 donation to the pro driver card measure, almost as much money as our campaign had in total.
 
Measure 88 was debated in public forums, in newspapers, on the radio, in the voter’s pamphlet, and on TV. Voters had a clear understanding of the issue.  It’s not often we praise the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals - but, this time they deserve iit!
 
Measure 88 was a Referendum calling for a no vote to rid citizens of a bad bill that had passed the Legislature but had not yet been put into effect. 

Measure 105 is an Initiative which must have a YES vote to REPEAL a bad law that’s been on the books for years.
 
Let’s make it two victories in a row.  Let’s overturn Oregon’s sanctuary law - Vote YES on Measure 105.  Talk to your friends, neighbors, relatives and fellow citizens - ask them to Vote YES on Measure 105, too!
 
YES on Measure 105 Lawn and field signs will be available this weekend - go to
and order YOUR signs today!

Responding to The Oregonian on Measure 105

On Sunday, August 5, The Oregonian published an editorial supposedly giving “facts” about Oregon’s sanctuary law and attacking Governor-candidate Buehler for supporting its repeal. 

The editorial presented an unfair, inaccurate picture of Measure 105, a measure supported by OFIR which would repeal Oregon’s illegal alien sanctuary law – ORS 181A.820.

According to the editorial, “one incident (Sergio Martinez’s rape of one woman and the sexual assault of another”), is no reason to toss a state law that has served us well over the past three decades.”

Apparently The Oregonian is unaware that there are close to 1000 criminal aliens with ICE holds on them, now serving time in the Oregon State Prison.  No one gets sent to the state prison for a minor infraction.   136 are in for homicide and 474 for sex offenses (sex abuse, rape, sodomy). 

A respected expert in law enforcement would certainly not agree with The Oregonian’s assertion that the state’s sanctuary law is “common sense.”  U.S. Attorney for Oregon Billy Williams condemns the sanctuary law as a major hindrance in enforcing federal immigration laws  He said in an article in The Oregonian last year: “Simply put, Oregon's sanctuary status declaration directly contravenes federal immigration law and threatens public safety. This has put many sheriffs in the position of choosing whether to violate state or federal law. It's an untenable position. …”

Furthermore, The Oregonian’s editorial statement that illegal entry is not a crime is very misleading.  A single illegal entry is a misdemeanor but if repeated after being deported, becomes punishable as a felony.  Also, Immigration and Nationality Act Section 237 (a)(1)(B) says: "Any alien who is present in the United States in violation of this Act or any other law of the United States is deportable."  This means that any illegal alien and any immigrant who overstays a visa is lawfully subject to deportation at any time.

The Oregonian objects to use of a single offender to illustrate problems with Oregon’s sanctuary law, but the newspaper itself repeatedly uses examples of specific illegal aliens to milk the sympathies of gullible readers and influence them to accept illegal immigration generally.

There have been hundreds of sob stories about the woes suffered by individual illegal aliens and how cruel people are to object to their presence.  Where are equivalent reports of the sufferings of the hundreds of Oregonians who’ve been killed, raped, robbed or maimed by alien criminals now sitting in our jails with ICE holds on them for likely being in this country illegally?

What would happen to the “drug crisis” if there were not an ample supply of illegal aliens to expedite international drug trafficking?  What would happen to the homeless population if they did not have to compete with illegal aliens for living space and jobs at living wages?

Hopefully, voters in Oregon will see that, contrary to the views of The Oregonian, true “common sense” requires repeal of Oregon’s outdated sanctuary law, and they will stop Oregon sanctuaries by voting YES on Measure 105 in November.

Celebrate Your Success - Sat. August 4th at 2:00pm

Alert date: 
2018-07-25
Alert body: 
Please invite a friend and plan to join us!
 
Initiative Petition #22 - to REPEAL Oregon's Sanctuary Law, has qualified for the 2018 General Election ballot.  Thanks to all who collected signatures and contributed in so many wonderful ways on behalf of IP 22.  We are now waiting to find out what our official ballot measure number will be in the November election.  We will let you know as soon as the number is assigned.

Join us as we celebrate your hard work and success at the next OFIR meeting Saturday, August 4th at 2:00 pm at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn in Salem. 

Brainstorming about the upcoming initiative campaign will be one of our main topics. 

Representative Sal Esquivel, one of the three chief petitioners on IP 22, will be the featured speaker.  He has been a great friend to OFIR and we are sad to see him go as he will be retiring this year.  We want to give him the best possible send off.

Driving directions to Best Western Mill Creek Inn

Across the street from Costco

Best Western Mill Creek Inn
3125 Ryan Dr. SE.
Salem 97301

From I-5, take exit 253, which is the intersection of I-5 and State roads 22 and Business 99E. Go West on 22 (Mission St.) a short distance to Hawthorne Ave. Turn R on Hawthorne Ave. to the first left, which is Ryan Drive. Turn left on Ryan Drive, by Denny’s Restaurant, and proceed to Mill Creek Inn just beyond.

 

Illegal immigration foes move to bypass liberal legislatures, take anti-sanctuary measures to voters

There’s virtually no chance that the uber-progressive Oregon legislature would ever repeal the state’s oldest-in-the-nation sanctuary law, which is why locals worried about illegal immigration have turned to the voters.
 
The Stop Oregon Sanctuaries campaign submitted roughly 110,000 signatures last week to qualify an anti-sanctuary measure for the November ballot, more than the 88,000 required, stunning liberal activists and laying the groundwork for a landmark ballot battle.
 
“This has national ramifications and our opponents know that,” said Cynthia Kendoll, president of Oregonians for Immigration Reform, which led the petition drive. “The thing that people don’t realize is that very seldom do citizens get to vote on immigration issues. They’re always legislated upon us. And that’s particularly the case in Oregon. We never get a say.”
 
Oregon may be ahead of the game, but efforts to bypass lawmakers and bring sanctuary repeals before the voters are gaining interest as the number of jurisdictions adopting measures aimed at thwarting federal immigration law explodes....
 
After signatures were submitted for Stop Oregon Sanctuaries, foes held press conferences in Portland and Salem to unveil Oregonians United Against Profiling, a coalition of more than 80 groups aimed at defeating the proposal, known as Initiative Petition 22....
 
Ms. Kendoll disputed the racial-profiling charge. “This doesn’t have anything to do with race in anyway shape or form, but that’s always the card they play because they’ve got nothing else,” she said.
 
She said she fully expects to be outspent if the measure qualifies—the opposition has already lined up support from Nike, Columbia Sportswear and labor unions—but she also knows how to win a campaign on a shoestring budget.
 
In 2014, her group qualified a veto referendum of Oregon’s newly passed law giving driver cards to illegal immigrants. Voters repealed the state law by 66 to 34 percent, even though Ms. Kendoll said her side was out-fundraised by 11 to 1.
 
“When we did Measure 88 they were very confident, even cocky, that they had the state sewn up,” she said. “And they just got blown away. So this time I think they’re going, ‘We can’t let that happen again.’”
 
Going the initiative route means doing it the hard way, she said, but organizers have little choice in deep-blue Oregon.
 
“The only way to move the needle at all in this state is via the initiative process,” Ms. Kendoll said. “It’s very grassroots, it’s very time-consuming, but we collected signatures from every corner of this state, and people are just fed up. They’re fed up with policies that have carved out a niche, a protected class of people that are here illegally. Why are we doing that?”
 
As a result, she said, “we have no doubt that if this qualifies for the ballot that it will pass.”...

 

110,000+ Oregonians Help Make The Arc Of History Bend Toward Immigration Sanity

Last Thursday and Friday, July 5th and 6th, the stalwarts of Oregonians for Immigration Reform [OFIR] submitted to their Secretary of State more than 110,000 signatures from registered voters. Their aim: Qualify for November's ballot an initiative IP 22 that would allow voters to repeal Oregon's statewide sanctuary policy that heavily restricts cooperation between Oregon law enforcement and the federal immigration agencies. (In late May, I reported on their efforts here.)


OFIR booth

 

As the number of signatures required was 88,184, OFIR has likely succeeded in the signature-gathering phase of their herculean task and must now embark on "making the sale" on IP 22 to all of the state's voters. But the OFIR-ites won't be certain of this first-step success until the Secretary of State has confirmed that enough of the signatures gathered are valid.

On July 8th, I spoke by phone with OFIR Communications Director (and founding President) Jim Ludwick, whom I have known for several years. Jim, who is also a veteran of OFIR's triumphant 2013 - 2014 "NO on 88" citizens'-veto campaign to nullify driver's cards for illegal aliens, was most impressed with the urgency many of his late-responding fellow citizens exhibited over getting their signatures in by the July 6th deadline. "On the steps at the state capitol Friday we had state employees come out to us to sign. We had truck drivers who were servicing the building sign. We had state police sign," he said. "There were people driving 60 miles each way to drop off one-line signature sheets."

"I wish everyone could see how frantic some registered voters were to get their signatures counted so that IP 22 will get on the ballot," Jim added. "There's a sense that ordinary folks are beginning to grasp what the future will be if we don't push back effectively. They know this country is at a tipping point. A lot of these people have been sitting on the sidelines, intimidated about being called 'racist.' The usual ..."

Indeed, there was active intimidation that affected how voters' signatures were obtained. Jim explained that more than 100,000 of the signatures OFIR collected were gathered by volunteers with clipboards or by people downloading single-signature petition forms from the web and mailing them in (or making a last-minute drive to the capitol in Salem!). Meanwhile, fewer than 10,000 signatures resulted from the work of paid signature-collectors because, Jim explained, the best venue for that activity is metro Portland, "where it became exceedingly nasty to collect signatures, especially for women."

Jim is quite optimistic that the 110,445 signatures OFIR submitted will yield the needed 88,184 valid signatures. That would require an 80-percent validity rate, well below the 93-percent validity rate OFIR achieved in the signature-gathering stage of 2014's "NO on 88" campaign. Nevertheless, he and the others in OFIR's battle-tested crew must wait, nervously, to hear from Secretary of State Dennis Richardson.

It's fortunate that they're battle-tested, as Jim expects that "The other side is about to pull out every dirty trick in the book." The dirty tricks will presumably be the work of "Oregonians united against profiling," an umbrella organization established on July 6th, according to an email forwarded to me. With their name presumably also announcing their approach, we can expect a campaign of distortion along the lines of that in 2010 associated with Arizona's SB 1070 law of phony "Papers, please!"-hysteria fame.

It's hard to conjure a nexus between racial profiling and anti-sanctuary policies, so "Ouap" already looks like it's grasping at straws—on their "Get the Facts" page, they trot out this indictment of OFIR and of the Federation for American Immigration Reform:

The groups behind the effort to throw out Oregon’s existing Sanctuary law are Oregonians for Immigration Reform (OFIR) and the Federation of Immigration Reform (FAIR). Both groups have been designated extremist hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Going to the link they provide lands you on a typical SPLC point-and-splutter page.

Meanwhile, assuming the signature-gathering campaign has succeeded, IP 22 will apparently be the only statewide immigration-related ballot measure in the country this fall. Immigration patriots nationwide can keep tabs on the campaign via the OFIR website and the related Stop Oregon Sanctuaries website.

 


 

Related

The SPLC File - An Exclusive Report on the Southern Poverty Law Center, The Social Contract, Spring, 2018.

Guest column: Voters should repeal Oregon sanctuary law

Should Oregon law provide sanctuary to illegal immigrants? This year, voters may get the chance to decide.
 
Activists affiliated with Oregonians for Immigration Reform are collecting signatures to seek to qualify a measure for the November ballot that would enable voters to repeal Oregon Revised Statute 181A.820. That law prohibits state and local law enforcement agencies from working to detect and apprehend “persons whose only violation of law is that they are persons of foreign citizenship present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.”
 
To begin, let’s clarify: If voters were to repeal ORS 181A.820, Oregon’s police departments and sheriff’s offices would not be required to help U.S. authorities enforce immigration law. Repeal would enable them, instead, to choose to detect and detain illegal immigrants on the basis of their illegal entry or visa overstay and to relinquish them to federal agents for removal from the country.
 
Is this a legitimate role for local law enforcement? In United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez (1999), the 10th Circuit Court recognized a “pre-existing general authority of state or local police officers to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws.” And in Arizona v. United States (2012), the U.S. Supreme Court held that local law enforcement officers may seek to determine the immigration status of someone they stop, detain or arrest if they have a clearly defined “reasonable suspicion” that the person is an illegal immigrant.
 
Suppose, after a repeal of ORS 181A.820, that many police and sheriffs chose to exercise their new power and that, as a result, the number of illegal immigrants in Oregon fell. What would be the practical effect of this on rank-and-file Oregonians?
 
On a routine basis, illegal immigration is precursory to other crimes — crimes that can impact Oregonians profoundly. “Virtually all adult illegal aliens commit felonies in order to procure the documents they need to get jobs, to drive and to obtain other benefits,” writes Ronald Mortensen, a fellow with the Center for Immigration Studies. Indeed, notes Mortensen, “the Social Security Administration and New York Times report that approximately 75 percent of illegal aliens have fraudulently obtained Social Security numbers.”
 
The U.S. Treasury Department’s Inspector General for Tax Administration, CNS News’ Terence Jeffrey reports, that between 2011 and 2016 there were “more than 1.3 million cases of identity theft perpetrated by illegal aliens … ineligible to work in the United States.”
 
A recent study by the Federation for American Immigration Reform found that the percentage of illegal immigrants incarcerated by states and localities is some 50 percent higher than the percentage of native-born Americans incarcerated. That’s borne out in Oregon, where illegal immigrants are estimated to comprise some 4 percent of the state’s population but, last month, accounted for 6.5 percent of the state prison population. Of those illegal-immigrant inmates, more than three-quarters were serving time for homicide, assault, robbery, kidnapping, rape, sodomy and sex abuse.
 
Illegal-immigrant crime wreaks havoc on too many law-abiding Oregonians. For voters to repeal the state’s sanctuary law — and give our law enforcement agencies the freedom to detect, apprehend and help remove illegal immigrants on the basis of immigration law violations alone — would be a major step toward a safer Oregon.
 
For information about the petition campaign to repeal ORS 181A.820, go to StopOregonSanctuaries.org.
 
— Richard F. LaMountain is a former vice president of Oregonians for Immigration Reform 

OFIR meeting Saturday, April 14 2:00pm

Alert date: 
2018-04-11
Alert body: 

Invite a friend and plan to attend OFIR's upcoming meeting Saturday, April 14th from 2:00 - 4:00pm.

Learn what's new with Initiative Petition #22 - to Repeal Oregon's sanctuary statute and find out what YOU can do to help get the initiative to the ballot this fall.  Learn more at www.StopOregonSanctuaries.org

Dan Laschober, candidate for House District 26 will join us.  All candidates are welcome.  If a candidate would like time to speak, please contact us in advance of the meeting.  If a candidate drops in and there is time at the end of the meeting, they will be given TWO minutes to introduce themselves to the group. Remember, please, OFIR is a non-partisan, single issue organization and we do not endorse candidates.

The primary elections are just around the corner.  This is a critical election and OFIR encourages everyone to be certain your voter registration is current and that you are well educated on the candidates and their positions on issues important to you.

Volunteer to work on a campaign, ask questions of candidates you are uncertain of, contact them via their website to confirm opinions you have about the candidate.  It's your responsibility to be educated before you vote.  And, it is critical that you VOTE!

We hope to see you at the meeting Saturday, April 14 at 2:00pm at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn - across from Costco in Salem, Oregon.

 

 

Oregon bill combats DACA termination, continues college tuition equity

Despite national efforts to end DACA, undocumented students in Oregon will continue to have access to tuition equity if Senate Bill 1563 passes.

Students who are not citizens have historically had to apply for "official federal identification" — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals documentation — before they can be eligible for resident tuition at public universities.

Otherwise, they have to pay non-resident or international tuition costs, which can be three or four times more than in-state tuition per year.

But since the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s deferred action program was terminated in 2017, the department is no longer accepting applications.

The Oregon bill is an attempt to bridge that gap, removing the restriction from undocumented students living in the state and continuing protections put into place in Oregon years ago.

In short, it would allow these students to continue getting access to lower tuition costs, scholarships and other financial aid. 

"This is the only country, the only state and the only home they have ever known," said Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, one of the chief sponsors of the bill. "Pure and simple, they are Americans in thought, word and deed."

Sen. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, Rep. Diego Hernandez, D-Portland, and Rep. Teresa Alonso León, D-Woodburn, are also chief sponsors.

Courtney worked on various bills in the past that sought similar equity for undocumented students, but did not come to fruition, including Senate Bill 10 in 2003 and Senate Bill 742 in 2011. Both passed the Senate but not the House, even with bipartisan support.

However, a Tuition Equity bill was passed via House Bill 2787 in 2013. This session's bill would protect the 2013 legislation, keeping the path to college open for the same students covered before.

"I didn’t know what I was doing at the time. I didn’t know about ‘tuition equity’ or federal immigration laws, we didn’t have DACA or DREAMers," Courtney said. " And the frustration these students felt after working so hard to graduate, only to realize they would be unable to afford college."

Not much opposition was voiced at the Senate Education Committee hearing Wednesday afternoon. However, Sen. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, requested additional stats on how many students would truly stand to benefit from the program.

The students covered by this bill must have been brought to the United States under the age of 16, are younger than 30 years old, do not pose a threat to national security or public safety and have continuously resided in the U.S. for the past five years.

Many of the education committee members, in addition to those listed as chief sponsors, are regular sponsors, including Chair Arnie Roblan, D-Coos Bay, Sen. Sara Gelser, D-Corvallis, and Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton.

"To punish young people brought here by their undocumented parents would be wrong. It would be cruel. It would be un-American," Courtney said. "They are every bit a part of our American family.

"Let’s send Senate Bill 1563 to the Floor," he said.

The work session for the bill was held over to the next committee meeting, scheduled for Monday, Feb. 12 at 1 p.m. in Hearing Room C at the Capitol.

One student's story

Edith Gomez Navarrete was brought to Oregon illegally from Mexico when she was 1 year old.

She graduated high school with honors, earned Bachelor's and Masters degrees and become a fourth-grade teacher at a dual English-Spanish immersion school in Eugene.

And even though she was one of only five students in her high school class to earn a full International Baccalaureate Diploma, she still faced many obstacles accessing higher education.

In 2012, Gomez Navarrete was accepted to Oregon State University and the University of Oregon, but was told she would have to pay international student tuition — close to $30,000 a year.

She was already living on her own and supporting herself. She said it would have been impossible to pay $120,000 for an undergraduate degree plus living costs.

"Undocumented students are ineligible for most scholarships, no matter how hard we work or how strong our academic record because the minimum documentation requirement is permanent residency," she said.

Gomez Navarrete shared her story when testifying at the hearing Wednesday.

She was able to access a school's Tuition Equity program and earn some scholarships as well, but could not access federal aid as an undocumented student.

"Without Tuition Equity, there was truly no possible chance we could ever pay for college," she said. "All we want is an opportunity."

In high school, Gomez Navarrete heard from many friends who saw no sense in even completing high school, because college seemed unattainable. Many dropped out.

"Look what happened when I had the opportunity," she said. "When we talk about the need to diversify Oregon’s teaching force so we can better reach all kids – they are talking about me."

While not all people who are undocumented at Latino, and not all Latino people are undocumented, there is a persistent educational achievement gap for Latino students.

More than 40 percent of Latinos in Oregon have earned less than a high school diploma, compared to only 9 percent of their white counterparts.

Additionally, only 23 percent of Latinos have some college or Associate Degree, only 12 percent have a Bachelor's Degree or higher. These numbers compare to 36 percent and 31 percent for their white counterparts, respectively.

"Oregon needs to pass Senate Bill 1563 to keep these opportunities alive, so young people have a reason to finish high school and have an opportunity to meet their potential," she finished. "We just want to find the chance to do what we were meant to do."

Contact Natalie Pate at npate@StatesmanJournal.com, 503-399-6745, or follow her on Twitter @Nataliempate or on Facebook a www.Facebook.com/nataliepatejournalist.

OFIR Membership Meeting Sat. Nov. 18th at 2:00pm

Alert date: 
2017-11-11
Alert body: 

You're invited to attend OFIR's upcoming membership meeting Saturday, Nov. 18th at 2:00pm.

OFIR will provide an update of our progress on Initiative Petition #22 and our efforts to Repeal Oregon's Sanctuary Law.

The NEW signature sheets that include our certified ballot title will be available for those that want to gather signatures of friends, family, neighbors or, who plan to attend an event or particular location to gather signatures.

We'll share many great tips and ideas for successful signature gathering, too.

While the election is a year away, candidates are interested in meeting you and sharing their plans for Oregon with you.  We'll see who stops by to say hello.

We will meet from 2:00 - 4:00pm at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn across from Costco, in Salem.

If you have any questions, please call the OFIR line at 503.435.0141.

Invite a friend to join you!  See you Saturday!

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