Oregon Legislature

Bad bills in Legislature – Read This

Alert date: 
2019-03-16
Alert body: 

Two very bad bills have been introduced in the current session of the Oregon Legislature.

HB 2932 “prohibits courts from inquiring into defendant's immigration status or requiring defendant to disclose defendant's immigration status at time of plea or at any other time during criminal proceeding.  Requires court to allow defendant, upon request, additional time for plea decision after informing defendant about possible adverse immigration consequences of plea. Declares emergency, effective on passage.”

This bill to protect illegal aliens and legitimize illegal immigration, opening our borders to the world without limit, has 26 sponsors, all Democrats, and may be fast-tracked through the Legislature as certain bills were done in the previous session.

A hearing is scheduled for Monday, March 18, at 1 p.m. by the House Judiciary Committee, which has 11 members, 8 Democrats and 3 Republicans.  There seems little doubt the Committee will approve the bill and send it on to the Legislature for a vote.

Please contact your State Representative and urge him/her to oppose this bill. Whether your Representative is a Democrat, a Republican, or other, it’s worthwhile to express your view.  

You can see an Overview of the bill at:  https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Measures/Overview/HB2932, and you can sign up there (in upper right corner) to receive notices of further action on the bill.

Statements by citizens on Legislative bills can be emailed to the Committee that’s hearing the bill (if a hearing has been scheduled.)  The email address for such statements is given on the Committee’s website.  Here’s an example of one filed that way:  https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/173965. Other citizen statements on HB 2932 will appear as they are submitted.  You can check back here to follow them:  https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Committees/HJUD/2019-03-18-13-00/HB2932/Details

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Another bad bill related to immigration which is of concern now is HB 2015It “eliminates requirement that person provide proof of legal presence before Department of Transportation issues noncommercial driver license, noncommercial driver permit or identification card.  Becomes operative January 1, 2021. Declares emergency, effective on passage.”

See Overview of the bill at:  https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Measures/Overview/HB2015?pubDate=2019-03-04-16-33.  It was referred to the House Transportation Committee where a hearing has not yet been scheduled.  You can receive notices of actions on this bill by clicking the top-right link on the Overview page.

Enthusiasm is contagious!

OFIR hosted their first membership meeting of the New Year on Saturday, Feb. 16.

How amazing, that even after the disappointing defeat of Measure 105, folks were full of enthusiasm and energy to move forward.

What a great group of folks - we look forward to what 2019 will bring!  If you are interested in making a difference, please join us as we work to save our state and our country from unfettered illegal immigration and excessive legal imigration.

Sign up for our OFIR email alerts and plan to attend our next meeting Saturday, May 11, 2019 - get involved and learn how you can make a difference!
 

ODOC counts illegal alien inmates

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Department of Corrections reports that of Oregon’s 14,780 prison inmates, 909 of them are illegal aliens identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and have ICE detainers placed on them. The undocumented aliens in prison constitute 6.15 percent of the total prison population.

Illegal aliens convicted in Umatilla County number 25, or 2.75 percent. That’s seventh highest among Oregon counties. Marion County has the highest number – 222 inmates accounting for 24.42 percent. It’s followed by Washington (192), Multnomah (172), Clackamas (76), Lane (42), and Jackson (33) counties. In Eastern Oregon, only Morrow and Union counties show up in the count, each with two illegal aliens convicted there.

Statewide, 189 of those inmates have been convicted of sex abuse, 169 of rape, and 131 of homicide. Sodomy is the charge against 99 of them. The rest committed numerous other crimes including drugs, assault, kidnapping and burglary.

Of the inmates convicted in Umatilla County, homicide is the most frequent charge with nine convicted. Several were convicted of sex crimes. Other offenses include assault, drugs, and kidnapping.

A total of 726 of the ICE-detained inmates, or 79.87 percent are from Mexico. Twenty two are from Guatemala, 15 from Cuba, 14 from Vietnam, 13 from El Salvador, and 11 from Honduras. Other countries with single-digit numbers are Laos, Federated States of Micronesia, Russia, Canada, Ukraine, Cambodia, China, Ecuador, Peru, and South Korea. A total of 62 of them have not declared their country of origin.
 

Candidate information available for May 15 primary

Ballots for the May 15, 2018 primary election are arriving in the mailboxes of Oregon’s registered voters.

OFIR has now posted information on the immigration positions of many candidates running in the primary. Please take a moment to look over the information before you fill out your ballot.

The offices for which informational reports are available on the OFIR website are:

Governor

Commissioner of Labor and Industries

Congressional candidates

Oregon House candidates (HD 09, HD 18, HD 19, HD 20, HD 23, HD 26)

Oregon Senate candidates (SD 3, SD 4)

Much of the information came from answers to questions in the 2018 survey of the Oregon Abigail Adams Voter Education Project. It contained a list of questions covering many political issues, including three questions on immigration policy for Governor and Legislative candidates and six questions for Congressional candidates. 

See the OAAVEP immigration questions listed in OFIR’s Overview for the Primary.  Other candidate information came from candidates’ websites, news articles, and official (OLIS) records of votes by incumbent legislators.   

 

A good bill went awry in the Legislature; consequences follow

You can trace the course of HB 4111 in the just-closed session of the Oregon Legislature and learn a lot about how political ball is being played there now to serve entrenched interests.

A perfectly good bill relating to Department of Transportation documents, which described “fees required when person is applying to replace or renew current driver license with Real ID compliant driver license or is applying for new original driver license that is Real ID compliant” was hi-jacked by means of an amendment and converted into yet another benefit — official driver licenses — for a group of illegal aliens.  This benefit can reverberate in future elections also unless voter registration processes are tightened.

The bill was Pre-Session filed, and originally sponsored by several Democrats and one Republican, Rep. Carl Wilson, of Grants Pass.  After the hi-jacking into a benefit for illegal aliens, Rep. Wilson removed his name from sponsorship and spoke against HB 4111.  As passed on March 3, HB 4111 was sponsored by these legislators, all Democrats:  Reps. Witt, Hernandez, Alonso Leon, Greenlick, Keny-Guyer, Salinas, Sanchez, Sollman, Williamson, and Senators Gelser and Manning. 

The maneuver to change the bill was accomplished through a Senate amendment referred to as Dash-10 in legislative lingo.  Then the bill incorporating “Dash-10” was put before the House for a final vote on Saturday afternoon, March 3, in the waning hours of the session

The claim is that “Dash-10” applies only to persons enrolled in the DACA and TPS programs, but those programs are not mentioned in the bill, and the bill contains other provisions that appear to weaken requirements for verification of applications.

OFIR President Cynthia Kendoll watched the action:   “… they introduced the amendment as Dash -2, with Rep. Hernandez as the sponsor - and then pulled it – and then, re-introduced it as Dash-10 - with the Senate Transportation Committee as the sponsor, then pulled it again ‘for negotiations,’ then, submitted the bill to the Senate with the amendment ‘engrossed’ in the bill.  It seems at every turn, and with virtually NO notice, the effort was made to obscure the fact that forces were at work behind the scenes to ADD driver cards for illegal aliens to HB4111.  Several people told me they went to OLIS and saw no amendment - so, ultimately did not submit comments - or call in about it.  Would we call that a slight of hand?”

Originally, the bill was introduced in the House on February 5.  The House considered the bill and passed it, without changing the text.  Then it went to the Senate where advocates for benefits to illegal aliens succeeded through “Dash-10” in turning the bill into a tool to suit their purposes.  It passed the Senate by a vote of 20-8, with 2 members not voting.  All Democrats present voted Yes, along with 4 Republicans, Senators DeBoer, Hansell, Thompson, and Winters.

Because the Senate amendment had changed the bill, it had to go back to the House for a final vote, 36-22.  Again, all Democrats voted Yes.  One Republican voted Yes, Rep. Richard Vial, who represents Sherwood, Wilsonville and Gaston.  All other Republicans present voted No.

OFIR President Cynthia Kendoll submitted testimony to the Senate Committee on Business and Transportation hearing on Feb. 26.  Her statement to the Committee can be read here.

OFIR Board member Mark Callahan gave oral testimony which can viewed in the Legislative video recording of Committee proceedings at: http://oregon.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=6&clip_id=24705.  He appears at about 6:35 in the video, speaking for approximately 2 minutes.  He entered into the Committee record a colorful chart  showing M88 vote results statewide; see it here

OFIR Board member Janice Dysinger submitted testimony also.  For some time, Ms. Dysinger, has been involved in research on the conduct of state elections and is active in Oregonians for Fair Elections, a citizen group working to protect the integrity of our state’s elections.  Her detailed statement to the Senate Committee on Business and Transportation on Feb. 26, raised many good questions about voter registration in Oregon and how it would be impacted by HB 4111.  See her statement here.

The only person who submitted testimony in favor of HB 4111 was Andrea Williams, Executive Director, Causa Oregon.   She wrote a letter that was entered into the record.

While Secretary of State Richardson recently gave Oregon’s voting system a clean bill of health, it’s clear that the registration processes can easily be corrupted and probably are, to an extent far beyond what the public is led to believe. There’s a high probability that HB 4111 would make the problem of illegal voting worse.

WHAT CAN WE DO TO GET OREGON ON THE RIGHT TRACK?

To OFIR members who feel discouraged after the passage of HB 4111 – remember – that is not the final move in immigration policy.  The route to change is open to us, in election of legislators who understand the importance of immigration controls and will put the interests of U.S. citizens first. 
 
Already through an informed and civic-minded citizenry, the U.S. has elected a President who believes in vigorous immigration law enforcement.  Other states are cooperating in the effort, and Oregon has shown broad support in the 2014 vote on Measure 88. 

Primary elections are coming up soon -- in May.  With members’ help, OFIR will provide information on the immigration positions of candidates, and members will have the opportunity to support good candidates and work to get them elected. The next session of the Legislature will convene in February 2019, after the November 2018 elections. 

You can view the candidate information that  OFIR posted on its website for the 2014 and 2016 elections here.  Many 2018 candidates for the Legislature and statewide offices have already replied to the 2018 Oregon Abigail Adams Voter Education Project questionnaire which includes questions on immigration policy.

Already candidates are speaking publicly and discussing issues; many have websites online.

In their candidacy websites, some candidates make their positions on immigration issues quite clear.  OFIR hopes to post all relevant information on its website for as many races as possible.   Three candidates for Governor who have good positions on immigration spoke at the February OFIR meeting. 

'Sanctuary State' Repeal Campaign Takes Advantage Of New Oregon Rule

Backers of a campaign to repeal an Oregon law that aids undocumented immigrants are taking advantage of new petition rules to make an early start on gathering the signatures they need to qualify for the 2018 ballot. [See the Stop Oregon Sanctuaries website.]

Cynthia Kendoll, president of Oregonians For Immigration Reform, says her group was unable to make the 2016 ballot with a pair of immigrant-related measures because their signature gathering was held up by lengthy legal fights over the wording of the ballot title.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson last month began the process of changing the rules so that initiative campaigns for the first time could gather an unlimited number of signatures before the wording of the ballot title was hashed out.

That seemingly arcane change could have a major impact on initiative campaigns, particularly ones that don’t have a lot of money to flood the streets with paid petitioners.

Kendoll said that ballot title challenges “have become more about delaying the initiative process than they are about making certain that we have proper language” for explaining a measure for voters.

A coalition called One Oregon opposes changing the 30-year-old “Sanctuary State” law, which limits local and state police cooperation with federal immigration authorities. The group has also filed a legal appeal with the state Supreme Court challenging the ballot title, which is meant to be a neutral description of the initiative.

Andrea Williams is executive director of Causa, an immigrant rights group, and a leader of the One Oregon coalition.

She said that Kendoll’s group has started early enough that it could probably qualify for the ballot even without Richardson’s new rules. She said the group filed an appeal to get the most “accurate and clear” ballot title.

Kendoll acknowledged her group is taking some risk by going ahead with signature gathering before waiting for a ballot title. 

In particular, several groups have talked about mounting a legal challenge to Richardson’s rule change. Ben Unger is the executive director of Our Oregon, a labor-backed coalition group. He said the secretary of state’s office should start over on the rules change because it contained some procedural errors. And his group is also looking into whether Richardson actually has the authority to allow initiatives to collect signatures without having a ballot title affixed to the signature sheets.

Oregon law says that petitioners have to gather at least 1,000 signatures before they can get a ballot title.  Richardson used that language to say that he could change the rules to allow petitioners to gather as many as signatures as they want until a ballot title is finalized.

If the immigration measure qualifies for the ballot next year, it could attract national attention. A large number of cities and counties around the country — including 15 in Oregon, according to Williams — have “sanctuary” protections for immigrants.

Oregon has the only statewide law, although California legislators are working on a similar measure.

Kendoll said the Oregon law should be overturned so that law enforcement in the state can fully cooperate with immigration officials. She noted the local furor involving the case of Sergio Jose Martinez, accused of attacking two women in Portland last month after being released from custody in Multnomah County last December. Federal officials say they asked the county to hold Martinez, but Sheriff Mike Reese said the agency should have issued a criminal warrant.

Williams said the Oregon sanctuary law improves public safety by encouraging immigrants to cooperate with law enforcement without fear of deportation.

Sponsors of the initiative need to gather 88,184 valid signatures by next July to qualify for the November 2018 ballot.

Legislature's 2017 session shows lack of concern for citizenship

The Oregon Legislature adjourned Friday afternoon, July 7.
 
But not before taking full advantage of their hefty majorities to further impede enforcement of federal immigration laws, to provide even more tax-funded services to illegal aliens, and to make it much more difficult for citizens to have their views reflected in legislative actions.
 
Informed citizens must find qualified candidates for office, who understand the importance of immigration law enforcement and will work for the best interests of citizens.  Volunteering time and/or resources to help with the campaign to elect them is crucial, as well.  Too many legislators and administrative officials are devaluing citizenship, encouraging illegal immigration, endangering our lives and well-being.
 
This has been made clear from three bills that were sped through late in the session with minimum public input allowed from citizens, showing that the sponsors and supporters knew voters would object if the bills were widely known and understood.
 
HB 3464, “privacy” for illegal aliens
 
HB 3464, granting “privacy” to illegal aliens, sheltering them from questions about their immigration status, passed on the next to last day of the session, July 6.  It had been rushed through the legislature with only one public hearing, June 8.  It was passed by the House on June 20 and by the Senate on July 6.
 
The vote in the House was 35 Yeas (all by Democrats) to 23 Nays (all by Republicans).  Two Republicans were excused from voting (Reps. Cliff Bentz and Dallas Heard).  In the Senate, the vote was 16 Ayes (all by Democrats) and 13 Nays (all by Republicans).  Sen. Betsy Johnson, Democrat, was excused from voting.
 
This bill, HB 3464, serves as a kind of backup for illegal immigration advocates in case the pending initiative to repeal ORS 181A.820 should succeed, and it may be necessary to mount an initiative to repeal the new “privacy” law as well as the earlier sanctuary law (ORS 181A.820), because proponents of HB 3464 inserted the Emergency Clause in their bill to prevent a citizen Referendum which is a less demanding way of overturning bad laws.
 
SB 229, “relating to elections”
 
Also on July 6, the Legislature passed another very harmful bill, SB 229, “Relating to elections: declaring an emergency.”  Secretary of State Dennis Richardson had earlier issued a warning about the bill, which triggered a hostile response from bill advocates.  He also sent a very good statement as testimony to the Senate Rules Committee Hearing.
 
He said “[this bill] manipulates the election process and keeps voters in the dark. …  It is a political ploy to undermine accountability by increasing power for politicians at the expense of the people.”
 
The bill changes the process for initiatives enabling the Legislature to control the timing of initiatives, the ballot title and other features that take power away from voters and centralize it in the hands of legislative leadership.  The press release issued by Oregon House Democrats obfuscates the issues in SB 229 so thoroughly that the average reader would never understand what is at stake.
 
The vote on July 6 in the House:  34 Ayes (all from Democrats) and 25 Nays (all Republicans). One member, Democrat Deborah Boone, was excused.
 
The vote on July 6 in the Senate: 16 Ayes (all from Democrats) and 14 Nays.  All 13 Republican Senators voted Nay, and they were joined by Sen. Betsy Johnson (D) who also voted Nay.
 
SB 558, “Cover All Kids”
 
This bill extends medical care coverage to children regardless of immigration status.  It is another expensive benefit favoring and incentivizing illegal immigration using taxpayer funds.
 
The vote on July 3 in the Senate:  21 Ayes, 8 Nays, 1 Excused (Sen. Baertschiger, Republican).  The 8 Nays were all from Republicans.  All Democrats voted Aye and these Republicans joined them:  Senators Boquist, Ferrioli, Kruse, and Winters.
 
The vote on July 7 in the House:  37 Ayes, 23 Nays.  The 23 Nay votes were all from Republicans.  All Democrats voted Aye and 2 Republicans did also:  Reps. Huffman and Olson. 
 
Petitions are pending to counter state government overreach
 
Initiative petitions give citizens a chance to correct bad laws.  Petitions require Herculean efforts, needing large numbers of volunteer staff and significant sums of money, but they are a last resort when the legislature fails.  
 
Currently there are two initiative petitions pending relevant to immigration issues, and also a referendum. They target the general election, Nov. 2018.  The public can follow the history and status of these measures by using the Secretary of State’s search form at: http://egov.sos.state.or.us/elec/web_irr_search.search_form.  Enter the number of the petition to see current status.  You can select either summary or detailed results.
 
IP 5 calls for proof of citizenship to vote. This initiative has been approved for general circulation.  A website, Oregonians for Free and Fair Elections, has been created and you can download a signature sheet for the petition, sign, and mail in. 
 
IP 22, to repeal Oregon's state sanctuary law, ORS 181A.820.  This petition has not yet been approved for general signature gathering.  A draft ballot title was provided by the Attorney General, “Repeals law limiting use of state/local law enforcement resources to enforce federal immigration laws.”  A period for public comment followed.  Whether this draft ballot title will stand is uncertain at this point. July 14 is the due date for a complete title and Attorney General letter.  If the “complete title” is unsatisfactory to proponents and/or opponents, it is subject to appeals that will delay progress.  
 
IP 301.  Rep. Julie Parrish is a sponsor of this petition for a citizen's veto referendum to overturn the Healthcare tax bill, HB 2391, that would allow some 15,000 illegal alien children to access free healthcare.  The website for this petition is ar https://stophealthcaretaxes.com/, where you can download a signature sheet to sign and mail in. 
 
There was a petition, IP 4, No More Fake Emergencies, filed to end abuse of the Emergency Clause in the legislature’s bills, but it has been withdrawn, because proponents were not able to collect enough valid signatures in the time allotted.  The brief record on this petition is available on the Secretary of State’s website, through the search routine described above.

ANARCHIC: Criminal aliens shielded by Left's symbolism

SALEM, Ore.-Democrats in the Senate today passed a proposal that will force Oregonians to obstruct justice by restraining them from cooperating with law enforcement in dealing with criminals at public schools, public health facilities, courthouses, public shelters and other public facilities.

"This bill is all about the 'undocumented,' and while it serves as a symbol for the Left, it is in reality a shield for criminal aliens to avoid justice," said state Sen. Alan Olsen, R-Canby. "Democrats have used the politics of fear to ignite division and they have stoked fear in the hearts of undocumented workers. Making it possible for criminal aliens to evade justice not only makes Oregonians less safe, it also puts undocumented immigrants in danger."
 
Olsen asked a series of questions to the carrier, Senate Majority Leader Ginny Burdick, D-Portland. He said the bill is nothing more than a "Trump bill." Olsen said that the senators took their oath to uphold the constitutions of both Oregon and the United States, and that everyone said "yes," or that he hopes they did. 
                                                                                                                      
While Oregon Democrats are bidding to block and deny federal law enforcement legal access to critical information that would help ensure public safety, Union-backed Democrats, formally requested information from the federal government about federal law enforcement activities in Oregon.

Murder victims advocate and child of an immigrant Maria Espinoza has worked across the nation to stand up for the victims of violent lawlessness. Espinoza spoke out on the horrific slaying of college football player Parker Moore. Moore was brutally stabbed to death as he shopped in a convenience store. The unprovoked perpetrator of this tragedy violated multiple laws. Espinoza is worried sick about HB 3464 and is urging Oregon lawmakers to oppose the bill. 
 
"How will you explain to the families of Parker Moore, Dani Countryman and others, that you had a part in making our communities dangerous for our children?" questioned Espinoza. "To move forward [in passing HB 3464] would be an outrage."
 
Espinoza recalled in an interview on her advocacy work how a relative, a World War II veteran, had his monthly pension cut from $240 a month to $200 - "and yet there were people illegally in the country who got everything free."
 
"And sadly, shamefully, I never did anything about it," she said. "For years."
 
Richard LaMountain, a Cedar Mill resident, served as a chief petitioner of the rejected 2014 initiative, Measure 88, which would have directed the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to issue at taxpayer-expense driver licenses to criminal aliens. The measure failed in the Nov. 4 election with a two-thirds no vote.
 
"It was an overwhelming rejection of giving drivers' licenses to illegal aliens," said Jim Ludwick, communications director for Oregonians for Immigration Reform in an interview about Measure 88. "But somehow that doesn't apply to people who are here illegally and think the law doesn't apply to them." 
 
Familias En Accion and Los Ninos Cuentan, on behalf of criminal aliens, sued the State of Oregon following voters defeating Measure 88. Their lawsuit was an effort to undo Oregonians' votes for Measure 88. Kristina Edmunson, then-spokeswoman for Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, said during the dilemma the state "is reviewing the case" but declined to comment further.
 
"When used for the intent of thwarting potential referenda, the emergency clause perverts the relationship between Oregonians and the legislators they elect to represent them," LaMountain said. "We need to restore that clause to its proper, limited role in lawmaking - and the voice of the citizen, as manifested in the referendum, to its paramount place in Oregon's representative democracy." 
 
"We should provide support for [law enforcement] and not support criminal behavior," Marion County resident Karen Franke said. Franke disagrees with Democrats that criminals should be shielded from accountability.
 
Rosenblum says the passage of HB 3464, "is imperative." And that Oregon must take "this important step to protect the rights of all Oregonians."
 
The bill now heads to sanctuary state-advocate and presumed leader of the Trump so-called "resistance" movement Gov. Kate Brown to sign into law.
 
###
 
For follow-up commentary please contact Olsen spokesman Jonathan Lockwood at 971-645-2140, or Jonathan.Lockwood@OregonLegislature.gov.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Criminal Alien Report June 2017

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) June 1, 2017 Inmate Population Profile indicated there were 14,708 inmates incarcerated in the DOC’s 14 prisons.

Data obtained from the DOC indicated that on June 1st there were 981 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the state’s prison system; approximately one in every fifteen prisoners incarcerated by the state was a criminal alien, 6.67 percent of the total prison population.

Some background information, all 981 criminal aliens currently incarcerated in the DOC prison system were identified by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a federal law enforcement agency that is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If an inmate is identified by ICE as being a criminal alien, at the federal law enforcement agency’s request, DOC officials will place an “ICE detainer” on the inmate. After the inmate completes his/her state sanction, prison officials will transfer custody of the inmate to ICE.

Using DOC Inmate Population Profiles and ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number inmates, the number of domestic and criminal alien inmates along with the percentage of them with ICE detainers incarcerated on June 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

June 1, 2017

14,708

13,727

981

6.67%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 June 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on June 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Marion

236

24.06%

Multnomah

208

21.20%

Washington

197

20.08%

Clackamas

77

7.85%

Lane

44

4.49%

Jackson

34

3.47%

Umatilla

23

2.34%

Yamhill

22

2.24%

Linn

17

1.73%

Benton

15

1.53%

Deschutes

15

1.53%

Klamath

15

1.53%

Polk

15

1.53%

Malheur

11

1.12%

Lincoln

7

0.71%

Clatsop

5

0.51%

Jefferson

5

0.51%

Wasco

5

0.51%

Coos

4

0.41%

Josephine

4

0.41%

Columbia

3

0.31%

Douglas

3

0.31%

Hood River

3

0.31%

Tillamook

3

0.31%

Crook

2

0.20%

Morrow

2

0.20%

Union

2

0.20%

Gilliam

1

0.10%

Lake

1

0.10%

OOS

1

0.10%

Sherman

1

0.10%

Baker

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

981

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 17.

Here are the ways Oregon residents were victimized by the 981 criminal aliens.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien prisoners incarcerated on June 1st by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

200

20.39%

Rape

172

17.53%

Homicide

138

14.07%

Drugs

107

10.91%

Sodomy

95

9.68%

Assault

80

8.15%

Robbery

56

5.71%

Kidnapping

27

2.75%

Burglary

21

2.14%

Theft

18

1.83%

Driving Offense

8

0.82%

Vehicle Theft

4

0.41%

Arson

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

55

5.61%

Total

981

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 17.

Using the DOC Inmate Population Profile and ICE detainer numbers from June 1st, the following table reveals the total number inmates by crime type, the number of domestic and criminal alien prisoners incarcerated by type of crime and the percentage of those crimes committed by criminal aliens.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC % All Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Sex Abuse

1,737

1,537

200

11.51%

Rape

971

799

172

17.71%

Homicide

1,708

1,570

138

8.08%

Drugs

851

744

107

12.57%

Sodomy

1,016

921

95

9.35%

Assault

2,051

1,971

80

3.90%

Robbery

1,544

1,488

56

3.63%

Kidnapping

284

257

27

9.51%

Burglary

1,310

1,289

21

1.60%

Theft

1,126

1,108

18

1.60%

Driving Offense

218

210

8

3.67%

Vehicle Theft

466

462

4

0.86%

Arson

74

74

0

0.00%

Forgery

47

47

0

0.00%

Escape

32

32

0

0.00%

Other / Combination

1,273

1,218

55

4.32%

Total

14,708

13,727

981

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 17 and Inmate Population Profile 01 June 17.

Using DOC ICE detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 981 criminal alien prisoners by number and percentage incarcerated on June 1st in the state’s prisons.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE Detainers

Mexico

786

80.12%

Guatemala

18

1.83%

Cuba

15

1.53%

El Salvador

13

1.33%

Honduras

13

1.33%

Vietnam

13

1.33%

Russia

9

0.92%

Federated States of Micronesia

7

0.71%

Ukraine

7

0.71%

Cambodia

4

0.41%

China

4

0.41%

Laos

4

0.41%

Marshall Islands

4

0.41%

Peru

4

0.41%

Philippines

4

0.41%

Somalia

4

0.41%

Thailand

4

0.41%

Canada

3

0.31%

Other Countries

65

6.63%

Total

981

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 June 17.

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($94.55) per day.

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 981 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($92,753.55) per day, ($649,274.85) per week, and ($33,855,045.75) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2016 U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $1,788,075.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2017, the cost to incarcerate 981 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($32,066,970.75).

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 981 criminal aliens includes the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), language interpreters, court costs, or victim assistance.

Bibliography

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile June 1, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/RESRCH/docs/inmate_profile_201706.pdf

Oregon Department of Corrections Population Profile (unpublished MS Excel workbook) titled Incarcerated Criminal Aliens Report dated June 1, 2017.

Oregon Department of Corrections Issue Brief Quick Facts IB-53, January, 2017:
http://www.oregon.gov/doc/OC/docs/pdf/IB-53-Quick%20Facts.pdf

U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), 2016 SCAAP award: https://www.bja.gov/funding/FY2016-SCAAP-Award-C.PDF

This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state.

David Olen Cross
Cell Phone: 503.991.2089
E-mail: davidolencross@hotmail.com

Oregon Republicans shrug off politics, extend benefits to undocumented children

Oregon Republicans took the lead in arguing for spending $36 million on health care for undocumented Oregon children during a Monday session.

The “cover all kids” Senate Bill 558 passed the body on a 21-8 vote. The bill now proceeds to the House where it's likely to find favor with the majority Democrats.

Senate Republican Leader Ted Ferrioli, R-John Day, said he’ll take a shellacking for his ‘yes” vote on the bill from constituents who believe extending benefits encourages illegal immigration.

“I can hear the town hall questions; I can write them,” he said.

“I will look at folks with anger in their eyes and they will not listen to the answer that it is less expensive (to provide coverage),” Ferrioli said, finally adding, “Folks can sharpen their knives and load up. I’ll be in the district after the session is over. I can answer the questions then just as I can now.”

The bill would extend coverage under the Oregon Health Plan to an estimated 15,000 children in the state who otherwise would be prohibited from signing up because they lack legal residency status.

Gov. Kate Brown highlighted the cover all kids program as a priority in her proposed budget. Ninety-eight percent of Oregon children are covered today. The bill, which takes effect Jan. 1, would bring the proportion even higher.

A hospital provider tax of 1.7 percent on large hospitals and 4 percent on small hospitals passed in June will pay for the expansion, according to legislative documents.

Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, carried the bill to the Senate floor and made the case that it is really a conservative bill. Children don’t go completely without care, he said. When they turn up sick at hospitals, hospitals have to treat them, and that’s the most expensive way to treat them.

“I know about the optics of this thing. We could get wrapped up in sanctuary this, sanctuary that. We could get wrapped up with immigration this or immigration that,” Kruse said. “This is not about the optics or the politics. This is about health care at a reasonable cost.”

Passing the bill will bring relief to hospitals large and small across the state.

“We have asked hospitals to step up in a major way with the provider tax,” Kruse said. “Now to ask them to absorb (emergency department) care for these kids is just one more ask. That is an ask too much. ...

“Chances are I’m going to take some political hits for this too, but quite honestly, I don’t give a damn. I don’t care about politics, I care about policy and I care about doing the right thing.”

Not all Republicans favored the bill.

“My priority are services to veterans who fought and have been injured for this country and for this state,” said Sen. Tim Knopp, R-Bend, who voted no. “We have not taken care of them the way we need to. If there are tens of millions of dollars, we need to start there.

“We can work our way to seniors who need care in their homes, those with disabilities, those who are vulnerable -- and there are many Oregonians who are in need,” he said.

All Senate Democrats voted in favor of the bill. Sen. Arnie Roblan, D-Coos Bay, a high school principal, said schools must teach all the children who turn up. “They only learn when they’re healthy,” he said.

Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson, D-Gresham, is a public health nurse.

“Every child needs health care regardless of where they were born,” she said. “It is the moral and right thing to do. A child is not responsible for who their parents are, whether they’re legal or illegal, whether they’re rich or whether they’re poor.”

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