Mexico

CBP Officers Catch Man Wanted for Sexual Assault of a Minor and Burglary as he Headed to Mexico

SAN DIEGO — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the San Ysidro port of entry yesterday took an undocumented man into custody, who was wanted for sexual assault of a minor and burglary, as he was attempting to enter into Mexico.

On Wednesday, April 26, Santiago Flores-Martinez, a 48-year-old undocumented Mexican citizen, was attempting to enter Mexico when he was stopped by the port’s Anti-Terrorism Contraband Enforcement Team (A-TCET) who was conducting southbound inspections of travelers.

A CBP officer conducted a query to get biometric information on the man via the “Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System” (IAFIS). CBP officers confirmed Flores-Martinez was an exact match to active National Crime Information Center (NCIC) arrest warrants out of Clackamas County, Oregon, on charges of sexual assault of a minor and first degree burglary stipulating no bail.

“CBP officers routinely encounter and stop dangerous fugitives, attempting to depart the United States,” said Pete Flores, director of field operations for CBP in San Diego. “Working with our law enforcement partners is not only critical but necessary in order to ensure justice is served.”

After the warrants were confirmed, CBP officers turned over custody of Flores-Martinez to the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS). He will be extradited to Oregon to face charges.

CBP officers put an immigration detainer on Flores so that after the judicial process he will be returned to DHS custody.

Criminal charges are merely allegations. Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

For more information about this case, please click on link to read a news release from the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office: http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/pressreleases/2017-03-01-CCSOPR-SexAssaultSuspectSketch.html


For statistics on more of our apprehensions, please visit our CBP Enforcement Statistics webpage.

For statistics on criminal aliens apprehended, please visit our Criminal Alien Statistics webpage.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

Suspect in sex assault of 9-year-old girl had been deported to Mexico

Oregon police were hunting an ex-con Mexican national accused of sexually assaulting a 9-year-old Portland girl while her younger sister slept just a few feet away.

Previously-deported Santiago Martinez-Flores, 48, has a decades old criminal history and already served time for assault, criminal mischief, unauthorized use of a vehicle and failure to perform the duties of a driver. He was deported in March 2001 after a two-year prison sentence but made his way back to the U.S. sometime before the February sexual assault in which he’s suspected, Fox 12 reported.

The girl was sexually assaulted as she slept in her apartment on Feb. 26, according to investigators. But she woke up during the incident and, after the intruder tried to hold her down, the girl was able to break free and run to her parents’ room, officials said.

The girl’s father quickly retrieved a gun and ran to confront the man, who had already escaped. However, the girl was able to describe her attacker and authorities said they found physical evidence linking Martinez-Flores to the crime.

Martinez-Flores may be using the alias “Felipe Coeto” or “Isidro Ramos Flores.”

“It's a terrible thing, and to have somebody take advantage of a child like that I think is one of the worst things that a human being can do,” neighbor Debra Griffith told KATU2. “I hope they put them away for a long, long time.”

DACA and Deportations - what really happened

It would seem that if one were in a foreign country illegally and then were fortunate enough to be given a special "DACA" status and allowed to remain in the country, they would follow every law and obey every rule to maintain their protected status. 

It seems, however, that Juan Manual Montes decided the rules didn't apply to him.  He was caught sneaking back into the country after leaving to visit his girlfriend in Mexico.  Find out more.

DACA Deported After Breaking Immigration Laws Again

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) deported a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) illegal alien two months ago—believed to be the first enforcement action taken against a recipient of President Obama’s unconstitutional amnesty program. DHS has confirmed that in February it returned Juan Manual Montes, a 23-year old illegal alien DACA recipient, to his home country of Mexico in February after catching him climbing over the border fence in Calexico, California. (Washington Examiner, Apr. 19, 2017) In a Spanish-language interview while detained, Montes admitted under oath to the Border Patrol to illegally entering the country. (Id.)

Montes’s decision to leave the U.S., allegedly to visit a girlfriend, violated the terms of DACA. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the DHS component that administers the unlawful program, DACA may only leave the country if granted advance parole. (USCIS DACA Guidelines) Advance parole is an administratively created tool that allows an illegal alien to leave the U.S. with a promise of being “paroled” back into the country upon return. (See FAIR Legislative Update, July 26, 2016) USCIS guidelines are clear that leaving without advance parole will nullify DACA status. “If you travel outside the United State on or after August 15, 2012, without first receiving advance parole, your departure automatically terminates your deferred action under DACA.” (USCIS DACA Guidelines)(emphasis added) According to DHS, “Mr. Montes lost his DACA status when he left the United States without advance parole on an unknown date prior to his arrest by the U.S. Border Patrol on Feb. 19, 2017.” (Washington Examiner, Apr. 19, 2017)

While amnesty advocates predictably cry foul, details are emerging that cast doubt on Montes’s eligibility for DACA in the first place. When President Obama unlawfully created DACA in 2012, one of the criteria for the amnesty program was having “continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007.” (USCIS DACA Guidelines) Montes claims to have been living in the U.S. unlawfully since the age of nine (approximately 2003), which, if true, would satisfy that prong of DACA eligibility. (Washington Examiner, Apr. 19, 2017) However, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) refute that claim, saying they encountered Montes in 2010 when he illegally crossed the border. (Washington Examiner, Apr. 19, 2017) Rather than face detention and removal proceedings before an immigration judge, Montes opted to be promptly returned to Mexico through a process called expedited removal. (Id.) The Obama administration’s approval of Montes’s DACA initial application and then renewal despite his being ineligible is further proof that USCIS blindly approved nearly every application without properly examining each case, as they claimed they did.

Even though DACA are not an enforcement priority of the Trump administration, Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended the removal on Montes. During a Fox News interview with Jenna Lee, Sessions reiterated that “Everybody in the country illegally is subject to being deported, so people come here and they stay here a few years and somehow they think they are not subject to being deported – well, they are.” (Fox News, Apr. 19, 2017)

Fast and Furious scandal: Suspected triggerman in border agent's murder arrested

EXCLUSIVE –  The cartel member suspected of shooting and killing Border Patrol agent Brian Terry in 2010 with a gun supplied by the U.S. government was arrested in Mexico Wednesday, senior law enforcement, Border Patrol, and congressional sources told Fox News. 

The suspect, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes, was apprehended by a joint U.S.-Mexico law enforcement task force that included the Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Marshals and the Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC).

A $250,000 reward had been sought for information leading to the arrest of Osorio-Arellanes, who was captured at a ranch on the border of the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Chihuahua. U.S. authorities have said they will seek his extradition.

Terry was killed on Dec. 14, 2010 in a gunfight between Border Patrol agents and members of a five-man cartel "rip crew," which regularly patrolled the desert along the U.S.-Mexico border looking for drug dealers to rob. 

The agent's death exposed Operation Fast and Furious, a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) operation in which the federal government allowed criminals to buy guns in Phoenix-area shops with the intention of tracking them once they made their way into Mexico. But the agency lost track of more than 1,400 of the 2,000 guns they allowed smugglers to buy. Two of those guns were found at the scene of Terry's killing. 

The operation set off a political firestorm, and then-Attorney General Eric Holder was held in contempt of Congress after he refused to divulge documents for a congressional investigation.

Four members of the "rip crew" already been sentenced to jail time in the U.S. Manual Osorio-Arellanes was sentenced to 30 years in federal prison after pleading guilty to first-degree murder in February 2014. 

In October 2015, Ivan Soto-Barraza and Jesus Sanchez-Meza were convicted by a federal jury of nine different charges, including first-degree murder and attempted armed robbery. 

Rosario Rafael Burboa-Alvarez, accused of assembling the "rip crew," was sentenced to 27 years in prison after striking a plea agreement with prosecutors.

The last remaining member of the "rip crew," Jesus Rosario Favela-Astorga, is believed to still be at large.

Border wall contractors brace for hostile environment

SAN DIEGO (AP) — One potential bidder on President Donald Trump's border wall with Mexico wanted to know if authorities would rush to help if workers came under "hostile attack."...

A U.S. official with knowledge of the plans who spoke on condition of anonymity because the details haven't been made public said four to 10 bidders are expected to be chosen to build prototypes.

They will be constructed on a roughly quarter-mile (400-meter) strip of federally owned land in San Diego ...

The process for bids and prototypes are preliminary steps for a project that will face deep resistance in Congress and beyond....

The Border Patrol and local police would establish a buffer zone around the construction site if necessary, the U.S. official said....

Enrique Morones, executive director of Border Angels, said his group plans to protest.

"There will be a lot of different activity — protests, prayer vigils — on both sides of the wall," said Morones, whose immigrant advocacy group is based in San Diego. "We pray and hope that they're peaceful."

Michael Evangelista-Ysasaga, chief executive of The Penna Group LLC, a general contractor in Fort Worth, Texas, said he has received about a dozen death threats since publicly expressing interest in bidding...

Evangelista-Ysasaga said he bid in part because he wants broad immigration reform. Securing the border, he said, is a prerequisite for granting a path to citizenship to millions in the U.S. illegally....

Building a wall on the Mexican border was a cornerstone of Trump's presidential campaign and a flashpoint for his detractors. The multibillion-dollar project along the 2,000-mile border has many outspoken critics, including the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mexico, which said last week that Mexican companies expressing interest were betraying their country.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said in a statement that it would pick multiple contractors to build prototypes...

The winning bidders must submit a security plan with details including "'fall back positions, evacuation routines and methods, muster area, medical staff members/availability, number of security personnel, qualifications, years of experience, etc. in the event of a hostile attack," according to the solicitation. A chain-link fence with barbed wire around the construction site is required. The agency said it won't provide security.

Bidders are also asked to demonstrate experience "executing high-profile, high-visibility and politically contentious" projects.

The agency, responding to questions from companies on a website for government contractors, said the Border Patrol would respond as needed if there is a hostile attack, but companies were responsible for security. The government won't allow waivers from state gun laws or indemnify companies whose workers use deadly force.

The website for contractors lists more than 200 companies that signed up for email notifications on the design contract...

Ronald Colburn, Border Patrol deputy chief when hundreds of miles of fences were built under President George W. Bush's administration, said companies should plan on training workers to know when to seek cover and stay put and when to retreat.

"Most of those organizations are probably fairly accustomed to that," said Colburn, who retired in 2009. "Some of them may be learning for the first time, that kind of risk at the borders."

Rights groups say Portland area 'Dreamer' picked up by ICE

Rodriguez Dominguez, 25, is connected to Portland and Gresham. He was reportedly taken from his Portland home Sunday morning after entering DUI diversion program last December.


A coalition of civil rights groups is accusing U.S. Immigrations and Custom Enforcement of arresting a 25-year-old immigrant in the Portland area early Sunday.

The Portland Tribune could not immedialtey confirm the claim with ICE.

According to a Sunday afternoon press release, Rodriguez Dominguez, 25, was arrested by ICE agents at his home in Southeast Portland. The release says Dominguez has been been part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program since 2013. They are known as "Dreamers."

The release was issued by the ACLU of Oregon, CAUSA, and the Latino Network. It says Dominguez entered a diversion program for Driving Under the Influence in December and quickly completed most of its requirments.

In December 2016, Francisco entered into a DUI diversion program. He quickly completed nearly all of the requirements of this program, attended all his court dates and required meetings.

"Despite Francisco's best efforts to make good on his mistake, ICE has taken the position that even a misdemeanor DUI eligible for diversion is enough to end DACA status. This policy is tearing apart his family, our communities, and does nothing to keep us safer." Andrea Williams, executive director of Causa Oregon, an Oregon immigrant rights organization, said in the release.

"His family said it was terrifying and they didn't know what to do. ICE agents were banging on the door. They didn't have a warrant, and were told they couldn't come in, but they wouldn't stop banging on the door," Stephen Manning, a local immigration lawyer who talked with the family, said in the release.

According to the release, Dominguez arrived in the United States at the age of five from Morelia Michoacan, Mexico. He has lived in the Portland metro area since then and attended Glenfair Elementary School, H.B. Lee Middle School, Reynolds High School, and Mt. Hood Community College to study information technology.

The release says Dominguez works for Latino Network, a community organization, where he coordinates a food pantry for low income families at Reynolds Middle School in partnership with the Oregon Food Bank and Multnomah County SUN Community Schools initiative. He also coaches a soccer team at Glenfair Elementary.

"Everyone loves Francisco. I don't know how we will tell the kids, families, and school staff he works with about this. They are going to be heartbroken to hear he has been taken away," the release quotes Carmen Rubio from the Latino Network as saying.

"We were shocked to learn that Francisco had been picked up this morning. A judge had already determined that he wasn't a danger to the community or a flight risk. So, why is ICE showing up at his house early on Sunday morning? These kind of brutal tactics do not keep us safe. It just makes people scared to live their lives and pushes immigrant communities further into the shadows." ACLU Legal Director Mat dos Santos said in the release.

To read a previous Portland Tribune story on the issue, visit portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/350750-229960-ice-in-the-city.

 

 


 

Oregon’s Marion County First in Foreign National Crime in January 2017

On January 1, 2017 Oregon’s Marion County had 232 of the 953 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was first in foreign national crime with 24.34 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Marion County residents were harmed or victimized by 232 criminal aliens incarcerated on January 1st in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

47

20.26%

Rape

46

19.83%

Sodomy

32

13.79%

Homicide

21

9.05%

Assault

15

6.47%

Robbery

13

5.60%

Drugs

12

5.17%

Kidnapping

10

4.31%

Theft

7

3.02%

Burglary

4

1.72%

Driving Offense

2

0.86%

Vehicle Theft

2

0.86%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

21

9.05%

Total

232

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from January 1st, the total number criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Marion County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

185

47

25.41%

Rape

170

46

27.06%

Homicide

136

21

15.44%

Drugs

112

12

10.71%

Sodomy

93

32

34.41%

Assault

75

15

20.00%

Robbery

54

13

24.07%

Kidnapping

26

10

38.46%

Theft

21

7

33.33%

Burglary

20

4

20.00%

Driving Offense

9

2

22.22%

Vehicle Theft

4

2

50.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

48

21

43.75%

Total

953

232

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 232 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents Marion County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Marion Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Marion County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

204

87.93%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.29%

Russia

3

1.29%

Cambodia

2

0.86%

EL Salvador

2

0.86%

Marshall Islands

2

0.86%

Vietnam

2

0.86%

Other Countries

14

6.03%

Total

232

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 January 17.

Criminal aliens from 20 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. He is a weekly guest on the Lars Larson Northwest Show. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

Deportation agency ignored 1.6 million visa overstays under Obama

The government flagged more than 1.6 million foreign visitors for overstaying their visas from 2013 to 2015, but deportation agents said they fell too low on President Obama’s list of priorities to bother targeting for removal, according to a watchdog report released Monday.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the deportation agency, concluded that it would cost too much to pursue the overstays...

Overstays pose an increasingly prominent problem in illegal immigration, with estimates saying that as the border has become more secure, migrants are attempting to enter by getting legal passes and refusing to leave when their time is up.

Some estimates say more than 40 percent of illegal immigrants each year arrived legally but overstayed.

While new border crossers were a priority for the Obama administration, overstays were not.

....ERO officials said that in most cases, overstay lead referrals do not have criminal convictions required to classify the referrals as DHS’ enforcement priority.”

The report said Homeland Security has made some strides in tracking visitors to see if they are leaving the country in time...

But the department is still struggling to figure out how to expand those pilot programs to airports nationwide, and it lacks plans to cover the land ports of entry, where millions of visitors arrive by car or on foot each day.

A biometric entry-exit system has been required by law for years but has been difficult to build.

Homeland Security collects information on arrivals at airports when they go for passport and customs checks but says there aren’t the same kinds of facilities available to track departures. Land ports of entry are even tougher, with visitors arriving in cars and on foot, without any of the infrastructure that accompanies airports or seaports.

Homeland Security has tried a pilot program at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport using facial recognition software...

President Trump last month issued an executive order demanding that the process be sped up....

Current law also requires an annual report on overstays, but for years the department refused...

Last year, the administration released a partial report covering business and tourist visitors, calculating that about 1 percent of those who came to the U.S. overstayed. That worked out to more than 480,000 people in 2015 alone, the report said.

That figure didn’t include arrivals by land, nor did it include critical categories for overstays, such as student visas.

Homeland Security had promised a more complete report this year and told the GAO it would be released by the end of this month.

According to GAO data, Homeland Security flagged more than 2.7 million leads of potential visa overstays from 2013 to 2015...

Another 155,000 cases were still open, while 27,000 were sent to ICE’s special Homeland Security Investigations unit to be probed as public safety or national security threats.

More than 5,000 of those were put in deportation proceedings, while 369 were arrested on criminal charges, resulting in 300 convictions. All told, less than half a percent were subjected to punishments because of their overstay status.

The remaining 1.6 million that were flagged were sent to deportation officers at ERO, but none of them was ousted because of their overstay status.

Meanwhile, on the border, illegal immigration appeared to drop in January, compared with December, according to the latest numbers from U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

The numbers are still high compared with past years — indeed, it’s the worst January in records dating back to 2012.

But total apprehensions of migrants trying to sneak across the border fell on a month-to-month basis by 27 percent, to 31,575. The number of inadmissible migrants who showed up at the southwest’s ports of entry fell 28 percent, to 10,899.

Apprehensions are deemed an indicator of the overall flow: The more people caught, the more are believed to be getting through....

Undocumented immigrants living locally face fears of deportation

Residents living in the Eugene area said Wednesday that they are nervous after Tuesday’s announcement that federal immigration authorities will begin aggressively locating, arresting and deporting people who are in the country illegally, regardless of whether they’re otherwise law-abiding.

Rose Richeson, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement public affairs officer for the Pacific Northwest, said Wednesday that ICE agents no longer will make deportation exceptions for any “class or category of removable aliens.”

“All of those in violation of immigration law may be subject to immigration arrest, detention and — if found removable by final order — removed from the United States,” Richeson said.

A final order is a final judgement made by a judge.

The memorandum, Richeson said, makes it clear that ICE will prioritize the deportation of illegal immigrants who have been convicted of a crime. Richeson also said that, in compliance with the Tuesday memos, ICE would conduct “targeted enforcement operations and allocate resources to work in jurisdictions with violent crime tied to gang activities.”

Documents released Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security outlined what policies and practices the Trump administration intends to implement in the coming months to combat illegal immigration.

The practices include enlisting local police officers to enforce immigration laws; establishing new detention facilities; publicizing crimes by undocumented immigrants; stripping such immigrants of privacy protections; discouraging asylum seekers; and immediately hiring at least 5,000 border patrol agents as well as 10,000 new ICE agents. The Trump administration has not announced how those new hires will be funded.

One of the memorandums directs the appropriate agencies to begin planning, designing, constructing and maintaining a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, complete with lighting, technology and sensors.

Despite Trump’s detailed implementation plans laid out Tuesday, local and state law enforcement officials said Wednesday that they had no intention of acting as ICE agents.

“The federal government has no authority to tell us to enforce immigration laws,” Oregon State Police Capt. Bill Fugate said. “In general, we can’t just enforce federal laws; we enforce state laws. We won’t be delegating our resources to enforcing immigration laws.”

Fugate pointed to a 2013 state law that prevents local and state law enforcement from using state money to locate people living in Oregon who are not U.S. citizens.

ORS 181.850 states: “No law enforcement agency of the State of Oregon or of any political subdivision of the state shall use agency moneys, equipment or personnel for the purpose of detecting or apprehending persons whose only violation of law is that they are persons of foreign citizenship present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.”

Eugene Police Chief Pete Kerns echoed Fugate’s comments and cited the same law.

Earlier this month, Gov. Kate Brown signed an executive order of her own designed to bolster protections in Oregon against deportation and discrimination of people who immigrated to the country without authorization.

Brown’s executive order bans state agencies from helping federal immigration officials find or arrest illegal immigrants. That would expand Ore­gon’s 1987 “sanctuary state” law, which already prevents any state or local law enforcement agency from doing so. The order also would explicitly prohibit state agencies from discriminating against illegal immigrants, unless existing state or federal law requires them to do so.

Brown’s executive order would apply to agencies such as the Department of Human Services, which administers Ore­gon’s safety net social service programs, as well as the Department of Education and the Department of Transportation.

Brown said at the time that she was concerned about news reports of plainclothes federal immigration officers making arrests and appearing to monitor people at the Multnomah County courthouse in Portland.

She acknowledged that she hasn’t heard of any state agency receiving requests from federal immigration officers for state assistance in implementing deportation efforts. Brown said her order primarily is a preventive measure.

“I want our agencies to understand that folks will not be targeted based on their immigration status,” she said.

Brown’s office did not return calls Wednesday seeking comment about stepped-up border security, immigration enforcement and deportations.

Deportations have taken place across the nation for years, including during the Obama administration, when 2.4 million people were deported from fiscal year 2009 to 2014, including a record 435,000 in 2013, according to DHS data.

The population of unauthorized immigrants living in Oregon is unclear. Census data indicate that about 130,000 undocumented residents lived in Oregon in 2014, according to the most recent Pew Research Center data.

Advocates of a new state law dubbed by supporters as “Cover All Kids,” which would extend government-funded health insurance in Ore­gon to many unauthorized immigrant children, estimate that about 17,900 unauthorized immigrants younger than age 19 live in the state.

But Lane County immigrant rights advocates and organizations said Wednesday that the Trump administration is using fear and intimidation tactics in its fight against illegal immigration.

David Sáez, executive director of Centro Latino Americano, said Wednesday that those tactics are working. Centro Latino Americano is a bilingual, multicultural agency that serves Latino families in Lane County.

Sáez said fear among some undocumented members of the community, as well as family members of those populations, grows with each new memorandum or executive order issued by the Trump administration or the president himself.

“There are people who are keeping their children home from school and who aren’t going to work because they’re scared,” Sáez said. “Being a safe community is critical. … We need to make sure our schools, our city, our county and our state are creating safe environments that allow people to go to work, to school, to get their groceries without feeling afraid.”

The new enforcement policies put into practice language that Trump used on the campaign trail, vastly expanding the definition of “criminal aliens” and warning that such unauthorized immigrants “routinely victimize Americans,” disregard the “rule of law and pose a threat” to people across the United States.

Despite those assertions in the new documents, research based on census data shows that there are lower levels of crime among immigrants than among native-born Americans.

Sáez alleges that much of the language presented in orders and memorandums from the Trump administration directly contradict the U.S. Constitution, which in a way can protect those who are prepared.

“How these documents were worded and how they square with the Constitution and the rights people have regardless of their status,” Sáez said. “A lot of what’s in those memos is contradictory to the law of the land, and I’m hopeful that we can challenge them.”

To prepare for the situation some Ore­gonians could face, Sáez said he and his colleagues at Centro Latino Americano have been holding workshops to provide guidance for immigrants in case ICE agents knock at their door.

“We’re helping families put together emergency preparedness kits so that if there’s a family member deported or detained, that there’s a plan of what will happen to kids and other family members,” he said.

Examples of those preparations included making extra car and house keys, gathering important documents and informing families of their rights.

Juan Carlos Valle, vice president and council treasurer of the League of United Latin American Citizens in Lane County, said Wednesday that LULAC also will be helping families prepare for what could happen.

“This is what’s left for us to do,” Valle said. “We need to inform our families of their rights and tell them not to get in trouble, because at this point they’ll (federal immigration agents) use any excuse to arrest them. We have to be the ones taking this step. They have to know we have their backs and we’ll speak up. This is my responsibility.”

Email Alisha at alisha.roemeling@register guard.com .


TIPS FOR THOSE WORRIED ABOUT DEPORTATION

Don’t open the door, but be calm. You have rights.

Ask what they are there for, and ask for an interpreter if you need one.

If they ask to enter, ask if they have a warrant signed by a judge; if so, ask to see it through a window or slipped under the door.

If they do not have a warrant signed by a judge, you may refuse to let them in. Ask them to leave any information at your door.

If they force their way in, don’t resist. Tell everyone in the residence to remain silent.

If you are arrested, remain silent and do not sign anything until you speak to a lawyer.

Follow driving laws and maintain a good criminal record. Younger generations should stay busy and in school, be respectful and avoid friends who might get in trouble.

— Source: Juan Carlos Valle of the League of United
Latin American Citizens in Lane County via the ACLU

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mexico