jobs

Immigrants’ Job Picture Brighter Under Obama Than For the Native Born

Under the Obama Administration, immigrants have fared better at finding jobs than the native born. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data indicate that as of August 2012, over 1.7 million immigrants found jobs during Obama’s term while only 418,000 native-born Americans did.

According to the BLS’ monthly household survey, immigrants garnered about three out of every four jobs added since January 2009 even though they are only one-sixth of the workforce. Between August 2011 and August 2012, immigrants won one out of every three newly-added jobs. During that period, native-born Americans gained 1.436 million new jobs, while immigrants acquired 788,000.

A separate BLS survey of employers indicates that immigrant job gains essentially equaled the number of new jobs added to economy since January 2009. Steven Camarota from the Center for Immigration Studies found that there was a net gain of 1.5 million new jobs between January 2009 and August 2012 while 1.5 million immigrants, legal and illegal, short-term and long-term arrived in the United States and found jobs.

The situation could worsen for the native born given the Obama Administration’s decision to grant work permits and deportation amnesty to as many as 1.7 million illegal aliens under the age of 31. The Migration Policy Institute estimates that fifty-eight percent of this group of illegal aliens are already working or seeking work, but having legal access will enable them to compete for a broader range of jobs with citizens, including higher paying ones.

The percentage of working-age Americans with jobs dropped from 60.6 percent in early 2009 to 58.4 percent in August 2012. That means about 3.9 million fewer working-age Americans are in the workforce. They are not included in unemployment numbers because they are no longer seeking work.

According to BLS, there are about 23 million unemployed and underemployed Americans now while about 8 million illegal aliens and another 16 million foreign-born immigrants hold jobs.

Congress extends E-Verify for 3 more years with near-unanimous support

Oh, how things have changed in just a few years.

It was just 3 years ago that an E-Verify extension was in doubt, making Thursday's near-unanimous House approval so significant.

To be clear, neither action was about mandating E-Verify for all employers. But for the government to even be allowed to offer E-Verify for voluntary use, the extensions had to be passed in 2009 and again this month.

Yesterday, the House of Representatives approved, with almost unanimous support, a bill that extends E-Verify for another 3 years. The electronic employment verification program, which NumbersUSA believes would have the biggest impact in ending the flow of illegal immigration to the United States, is set to expire at the end of the month, but, now that it's passed through both chambers of Congress, we fully expect Pres. Obama to sign the extension into law.

The extension was offered in the Senate, by Democratic Senator Pat Leahy, where it passed with unanimous consent. The bill then showed up on Tuesday's House calendar under a House procedure called "Suspension of the Rules". The House suspends the rules when House Leaders believe the bill is "non-controversial" and has support of at least two-thirds of its Members. When the bill is brought to the floor, a motion to suspend the rules is raised. No amendments are offered and a two-thirds vote is required for passage. In many instances, there's no roll call, just a voice vote. After coming to the floor on Tuesday, the vote was delayed until Thursday when it passed by a 412-to-3 margin .

E-Verify is now officially, in the minds of Congress and its Leaders, "non-controversial". The E-Verify extension didn't come without compromise, though. The bill also extends three small visa programs, including religious worker visas, investor visas, and cultural exchange visas.

Why was today's vote such a big deal? Three years ago, an extension of the E-Verify program was a bit more contentious.

It was set to expire in March of 2009, so lawmakers began working on an extension in the fall of 2008. Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey, however, wouldn't lift a hold he placed on the extension without a massive increase in green cards, so Congress kicked the E-Verify can down the road until the spring.

Facing expiration at the end of March 2009, a new debate started during the Senate's consideration of a must-pass, omnibus spending bill earlier in the month. Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama offered a 5-year E-Verify extension as an amendment, but a motion to table the amendment was raised - ironically by Sen. Leahy. The motion to table passed by a 50-to-47 margin, but Congress did gave E-Verify a 6-month lifeline by extending the program through September 2009.

In June 2009, the debate surfaced again with the House Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee including a 2-year reauthorization in its markup of the DHS spending bill for 2010. The bill would eventually pass through the House.

In July 2009, Sen. Sessions offered an amendment during the Senate's consideration of the DHS spending bill, but this amendment would permanently reauthorize E-Verify. Again, a motion to table Sen. Sessions amendment was raised, but unlike in the spring, and with the unemployment rate soaring, the motion was defeated by a 44-to-53 margin. (Read Roy's analysis of the vote.)

The DHS spending bill, however, never became law, and it wasn't until a continuing resolution passed in October 2009 that E-Verify was re-authorized.

So after all the drama of 2009, here we are in the first week of legislative business after a month-long summer recess, and the House has quietly passed a bill, without controversy, that will extend E-Verify through September of 2015.

We would have liked a permanent reauthorization of E-Verify like the one Sen. Sessions offered back in 2009, but an extension of E-Verify before it expired and without controversy is a major improvement over 2009, and maybe one small step towards a nationwide mandate of E-Verify for all employers in the future.

E-Verify needed now more than ever

It seems like only yesterday when we were calling members of Congress asking them to extend the E-Verify program. Those of you who were members in 2009 likely recall that it looked as if E-Verify was going to die. Thanks to your actions and phone calls from thousands of citizens we saved it. Look what happened last week when the reauthorization came up for another vote. What a different story this year!

This past Thursday the House of Representatives passed a three-year extension of E-Verify by a 412 to 3 vote. It passed the Senate by a unanimous consent vote.

At the Oregon Legislature Representative Kim Thatcher is going to introduce an E-Verify bill for next year’s session.  American citizens should not have to compete at any time for jobs against workers who are illegally in the country. It is unconscionable that during the worst recession since the Great Depression that American workers are faced with precisely that situation. E-Verify is needed now more than ever.

Read more in this great write up from NumbersUSA

Supporters, opponents of rule affecting non-citizens speak out

Testimony on a provision banning non-citizens from serving as the City of Keizer’s youth councilor ranged from blasting the group for lost opportunities to support for the rule of law.

A work session Monday night at the Keizer Civic Center drew more than 50 people for what might ordinarily be a little-discussed topic: Rules and procedures for the city council.

Of course, this was no ordinary meeting: It was held at the behest of CAUSA, an immigrant rights group who requested to speak with Mayor Lore Christopher.

Francisco Lopez, executive director of CAUSA, questioned the timing of the decision: It came the same night Hugo Nicolas, a former Keizer youth councilor, received an award from the City of Salem and within days of speaking to numerous media outlets about his status as an illegal immigrant.

Lopez also asked how it would be enforced.

“How are you going to make a determination? Based on the color of skin? Or their last name?” Lopez said.

The council’s supporters came back to one theme: The rule of law, and whether allowing students whose parents brought them to the country illegally bends those laws too far.

State Rep. Kim Thatcher, R – Keizer, compared the situation to relatives who own land in another part of the state and live there part-time.

“They could contribute to their community all day long and they couldn’t run for city council because they don’t live there full-time,” Thatcher said. “There just has to be lines that are drawn (and) what you’re drawing is sensible.”

Nicolas himself addressed the council, saying he felt shame as he came to the Keizer Civic Center to volunteer as a police cadet or in the youth council role, then go home to a crowded house, with relatives sleeping in the garage.

“Here in Keizer and around the country we share a city, but not a community,” Nicolas said. “… We learn to only share a common fear.”

Councilor David McKane said earlier in the meeting the revised council rules had been in the works for about a year, and that the changes were not associated with Nicolas personally.

“It has nothing to do with you and people that say that should be ashamed,” McKane said.

Peter Dane testified that rules should maintain accountability for parents to follow the law for the sake of their children.

“To keep demanding more loopholes in the law … is selfish and egregious,” Dane said.

Dennis Koho, a former mayor who is unopposed in his candidacy for city council, said a system shouldn’t penalize children for their parents’ decision as of where to live.

“We can best help those future leaders by being inclusive rather than saying we’re only going to take a look at a certain type of young person,” Koho said.

Eduardo Angulo, chairman and executive director of the Salem-Keizer Coalition for Equality, said volunteer opportunities for immigrant children help bolster the area, comparing it favorably to troubled neighborhoods in southern California and New York City.

“You’re excluding a great deal of the population of Latino youth … who could be part of the solution,” Angulo said.’

Judy DeSpain said Nicolas was a victim of his parents’ lawlessness.

“Illegal immigrants cannot have the same rights as U.S. citizens,” DeSpain said. “To do so means our laws and citizenship are meaningless for all.”

OFIR VP published in Washington Times

Rick LaMountain is a talented writer often published in The Oregonian.  LaMountain has a gift for making a clear point and did just that, in a well sourced commentary about unions and their involvement in illegal immigration issues.

Friday, September 7, 5th Congressional District Debate

Alert date: 
September 5, 2012
Alert body: 

-Election 2012-

5th Congressional District Debate:   Lugo, Schrader and Thompson

Salem City Club is pleased to host a debate between the three candidates seeking to represent Oregon's 5th congressional district in U.S. House of Representatives. Join us on Friday, September 7 at noon when we open our 45th season with this dynamic program. Congressional District 5 encompasses Tillamook, Lincoln, Polk, Marion, and Clackamas counties, rural, metro, coastal, and suburban neighborhoods.

For more information please visit the Salem City club website.

NOTE:  Incumbent Kurt Schrader has a D grade on immigration issues according to NumbersUSA.  Oregon deserves better!

This evening is your opportunity to make a difference - attend Keizer City Council Work Session, Monday, September 10th

Alert date: 
September 7, 2012
Alert body: 

Salem and Keizer members, friends and supporters,

Sometimes it feels like the issue of illegal immigration is too big and there is nothing one person can do.  But, here is a great opportunity right in our own backyard!

On Monday, September 10th, the Keizer City Council will have a Work Session at 5:45 p.m (OFIR suggests arriving earlier, if possible). The topic for the work session will be the City Council Rule that requires youth councilors to be electors when they turn 18 years of age. In essence the rules require that youth councilors must be U.S. citizens.

The city council has come under pressure from outside groups to allow “undocumented aliens” to become youth councilors. Of course people who are not in the US legally cannot become electors. The purpose of the program is that the city council wanted young adults to gain experience and hopefully someday they would then decide to get involved in their local government. OFIR believes the program should be open only to American citizens and not those in our country illegally.  Please plan to attend and bring a friend or neighbor.  It is OFIR's understanding that pro-illegal immigration groups plan to "occupy" this event.  If so, please to NOT engage in any combative language or yelling.  Be polite and respectful if called on to comment.  We want everyone to be safe!

What: The work session will be held in the Keizer Council Chambers.

When: 5:45 Monday, September 10. (go earlier if possible)

Where: Keizer City hall, 930 Chemawa Road NE, Keizer, OR 97303.

OFIR encourages you to attend the work session and let the city council know that

you support their rule requiring only people legally in the country be allowed in the program.

The work session will start at 5:45 p.m. (get there earlier, if possible)

If you have any questions please call the OFIR office at (503) 435-0141.

On deporting illegal aliens - Thoughts of a retired Border Patrol agent

One of the original intentions of immigration law, and the effort to locate and remove those illegally in our country, was the concern for displacement of American employees. It was considered somewhat the acid test. If American employees were being set aside, the offending illegals were arrested and deported. At some juncture in the recent past, that concept was apparently pitched out the window. The big conundrum is not so much that it happened, but rather why did it happen. It's the product of a frightening political shift that is totally incomprehensible to anyone other than those who seek reelection. It's also bi-partisan. It has to stop, and we have to return to rational thinking.

Depending on whose estimates one uses, we have nearly as many illegals employed as we do legal residents and citizens out of work. Certainly more than 50 percent. That quite simply has to stop.

That we cannot deport such huge numbers, and therefore must create a method through which illegals can remain, is pure political bunk. How do we deport them? In earnest. We start with number one, and we work our way up the ladder. We streamline the processing, and remove administrative road-blocks. When I was first in the Border Patrol, we were led to believe that there was a time when processing an illegal was nothing more than a 3x5 hand written card; probably during Operation Wet Back. Today, the same thing can be done, but on a computerized system. Prints can be digitally checked, and repeat offenders can get their due. Yes, it can be done, and it must be done. All, however, is contingent on a relatively well-sealed border. That's the first order of the day.

Hasta La Vista,

Gary Fossen,

Jacksonville, Oregon


 

Oregonians should be proud?

Not surprising is the recent report claiming Oregon's teen unemployment rate is the 3rd highest in the country.  How thoughtful of President Obama to grant over 16,000 illegal aliens in Oregon alone, a "deferred action" from deportation and giving them work permits, as well.  

Nationwide, an estimated 1.8 million 15-30 year old illegal aliens will avoid deportation by this questionable move.
 

Oregon teen unemployment 30%

Oregon teenagers faced a challenging job market this summer.

An analysis by the Employment Policies Institute found that the state's unemployment rate in July was 30.3 percent, the third-highest among the states.

Using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the institute pegged national teen unemployment at 23.8 percent. Between April and July, the number of unemployed citizens between the ages of 16 and 24 rose by 2.1 million, to 19.5 million.

“The nation’s teens have suffered through a fourth summer of difficult job prospects,” said Michael Saltsman, research fellow at EPI. “As a result, thousands are going back to school having missed out on the valuable career experience that comes from an entry-level job.”

The EPI analysis found that 19 states had teen unemployment rates of more than 25 percent from August 2011 through July 2012. Here is the breakdown:

1. California 35.4%
2. South Carolina 30.5%
3. Oregon 30.3%
4. Georgia 30.2%
5. Hawaii 29.6%
6. Arizona 28.7%
7. Washington 28.7%
8. Louisiana 27.5%
9. North Carolina 27.5%
10. Rhode Island 27.4%
11. Colorado 27.3%
12. New York 27.1%
13. Mississippi 26.9%
14. Illinois 26.5%
15. Nevada 26.3%
16. Florida 25.7%
17. New Jersey 25.6%
18. Idaho 25.1%
19. Kentucky 25.0%
 

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