Mexico

Oregon's governor should be working for Oregon families, Oregon jobs and Oregon citizens...

Governor John Kitzhaber, has just issued a proclamation. Oregon State Police will now have to accept the Mexican Matricular card in lieu of a valid Oregon State driver license if an illegal alien is questioned by State Police.

The FBI, in testimony before a House Subcommittee on Immigration, stated that the Matricular card is not a reliable form of identification and poses, “major criminal threats and potential terrorist threats.” Apparently not a problem for the Governor; He always has state police escorts to protect him.

Think of the problem that this will present to Oregon State Police. If they pull over a speeding or drunk driver and they present a Mexican Matricular card, how can the trooper check on his driving record? There is no driving record available on Matricular cards. Maybe we should all sign up to become an illegal alien.

In 2008 the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 1080. SB 1080 required that only people legally in the U.S. could receive an Oregon Driver license. The Governor seems to think that he can over rule state laws by issuing edicts.

 

US counters drug smugglers in Mexican newspapers

The war on drugs is going to the classified sections of Mexican newspapers.

Smugglers have long advertised work as security guards, house cleaners and cashiers, telling applicants they must drive company cars to the United States. They aren't told the cars are loaded with drugs.

Starting this week, U.S. Immigration and Customs and Enforcement began buying ad space in Tijuana newspapers to warn job seekers they might be unwitting pawns.

"Why don't we do the same thing that (cartels are) doing? It's successful for them. Why wouldn't it be successful for us?" Lester Hayes, a group supervisor for ICE in San Diego, recalls his agents telling him.

There have been 39 arrests since February 2011 at San Diego's two border crossings tied to the ads for seemingly legitimate jobs, according to ICE, which hadn't seen such significant numbers before.

Those arrests have yielded 3,400 pounds of marijuana, 75 pounds of cocaine and 100 pounds of methamphetamine _ a tiny fraction of total seizures but enough to convince U.S. authorities that smugglers are increasingly turning to the recruitment technique.

Drug smugglers always look to exploit weak links along the 1,954-mile border, even if the window of opportunity is brief. In the past several years, they have turned to makeshift boats on the Pacific Ocean and ultra-light aircraft in the deserts of California and Arizona. In the San Diego area, there has been a spike in teenagers strapping drugs to their bodies to walk across the border from Tijuana.

Some suddenly popular techniques are limited to particular pockets of the border. ICE has not spotted significant spikes in newspaper ads outside of San Diego.

Ads that authorities connect to drug smugglers appear innocuous. They offer work in the United States _ an invitation that only people who can cross the border legally need apply _ with a phone number and sometimes a location to apply in person.

New hires are told to drive company cars across the border, typically to a fast-food restaurant or shopping center in San Diego, according to ICE. When they arrive, they are often told there will be no work after all that day and must leave the car and walk back to Mexico after being paid a small amount.

The drivers are typically paid $50 to $200 a trip _ much less than the $1,500 to $5,000 that seasoned smugglers are typically paid for such trips, Hayes said.

For drug traffickers, the tactic lowers expenses and, they hope, makes drivers appear less nervous when questioned by border inspectors, said Millie Jones, an assistant special agent in charge of investigations for ICE in San Diego.

The drugs are stashed in the usual ways. Fifteen pounds of methamphetamine were found in a pickup truck's phony exhaust pipe in November. More than 250 pounds of marijuana were discovered in a van's overhead compartment last April.

More than 200 pounds of marijuana were found in vacuum-sealed plastic bags smothered in grease. Drugs are typically mixed with mustard, ketchup and fabric fresheners to defuse odors and ward off dogs used by authorities.

For years, U.S. authorities have bought newspaper space and broadcast airtime south of the border to deter illegal border crossings. The Border Patrol has a long-running media campaign in Mexico and Central America that includes musical "corridos," short documentaries and public service announcements.

The ICE ads that began appearing Sunday in classified sections of Tijuana's Frontera and El Mexicano are nothing fancy. Bold black letters say, "Warning! Drug traffickers are announcing jobs for drivers to go to the United States. Don't fall victim to this trap."

Mexican newspapers have faced online competitors but the papers' classified sections are relatively robust compared to U.S. publications.

Victor Clark, director of Tijuana's Binational Center for Human Rights, doubts the ads will work without specific instructions on how to confirm whether a company is legitimate, such as calling an ICE telephone number.

"It's very difficult for someone who is unemployed to know whether it's a trap," Clark said. "I don't think many people are inclined to investigate if they are desperate for work."

The cases can be challenging for prosecutors because drivers may not know they are smuggling drugs.

Debra Hartman, a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego, declined to say how many cases have been prosecuted or cite any examples. Rachel Cano, assistant chief of the San Diego County district attorney's southern branch, said each case is different.

"Just like any other case, a theft case, we look at all of the facts and if there are sufficient facts that meet the elements of a crime and we can prove it beyond a reasonable doubt, then we file charges," Cano said.

Guadalupe Valencia, a San Diego defense attorney, said the ads by U.S. authorities might inadvertently help defendants. Attorneys will argue it is an acknowledgement that people are often tricked.

"It has always been my opinion that there are many unknowing couriers," he said. "The challenge for the prosecution is you always have to prove knowledge."


 

Mark your calendar for Saturday, May 12

OFIR members and concerned citizens, you're invited to bring a friend and join us Saturday, May 12 at 2:00 pm for a behind the scenes look at the Arizona - Mexico border.  OFIR President, Cynthia Kendoll traveled with the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) and a small group of concerned citizens from around the country on a week long, intensive study of the situation on our southern border in restricted areas not safely accessible to citizens.  Cynthia will be presenting a photographic tour of what she witnessed on the trip.  Move past the propaganda and see what is really happening.  During the trip, specialists in several governmental departments shared how they are impacted every day by illegal immigration.  Mark your calendar and plan to attend.  

Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 2 pm

In Salem, at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn,

3125 Ryan Dr SE, just west of I-5 Exit 253, across from Costco.

 

ICE arrests man involved in 2007 Oregon City killing

PORTLAND, Ore. — A 25-year-old Mexican national linked to the killing of a Texas teen five years ago is facing deportation following his arrest Friday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers.

Gilberto Javier Arellano-Gamboa was turned over to ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers following his release by the Oregon Department of Corrections. The custody transfer occurred after Arellano-Gamboa fulfilled a 50-month sentence imposed following his conviction for attempted first degree sexual abuse. Arellano-Bamboa will be held at the Northwest Detention Center, Tacoma, Wash., where he will be processed for administrative removal and repatriation to Mexico.

"Identifying and removing criminal aliens is a top enforcement priority for ICE," said Nathalie Asher, field office director of ICE ERO in Oregon. "By working hand-in-hand with local officials, we can help ensure that individuals like Arellano-Gamboa don’t pose a threat to public safety."

Arellano-Gamboa was arrested in 2007 along with his cousin Alejandro Emeterio Rivera-Gamboa. They were charged with the killing of 15-year-old Dani Countryman at an Oregon City apartment. Rivera-Gamboa ultimately pleaded guilty to aggravated murder and abuse of a corpse and was sentenced to life in prison. Four others were also convicted of crimes related to sex abuse of a minor.

Prior to his arrest and conviction, Arellano-Gamboa had no known criminal history or recorded encounters with ICE.

ICE is focused on smart, effective immigration enforcement that targets serious criminal aliens who present the greatest risk to the security of our communities, such as those charged with or convicted of homicide, rape, robbery, kidnapping, major drug offenses and threats to national security.

 

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OFIR President returns safely from border tour

OFIR's President has returned from a week long intensive study of the Arizona/Mexico border.  Meeting with experts from Border Patrol, National Parks, DEQ, Fish and Wildlife, the Tohono O'odham Indian Nation and law enforcement officers from several agencies all along the border, Cynthia has gained a great deal of insight into the issues on the border.  Please check back for updates.


 

Is the Border Secure? Shocking Video Shows Otherwise

Just about a week ago, we were given a video exposing a major breach on the U.S./Mexico border near Lukeville, Arizona, located about 100 miles southwest of Tucson.  We checked its authenticity with our sources at the Department of Homeland Security who have confirmed that the video is real and was taken recently.  This was first posted by Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever and see how, despite claims by the Administration, the border is far from secure.

border video

Our DHS sources have been able to determine from the clothes the men are wearing, the straps on their backpacks, and other things they're carrying, that these are indeed drug smugglers bringing hundreds of pounds of illegal drugs into the United States.

The fence shown here was built by the Bush Administration and part of a $1 billion contract with Boeing. Amazingly, the fence was designed to do exactly what the smugglers did. The fence panels slide inside two steel columns, but no one in the Bush Administration nor at Boeing even considered welding the panels to the posts, making it easy for smugglers to get through. What we don't know is if they failed to weld along the entire length of the fence or just in some areas.

DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano has testified before Congress, saying the border is more secure now than it's ever been. Administration officials boast about fewer border crossings and the effectiveness of thousands of more border patrol agents. But where are the border patrol agents in this video? And if there aren't any border patrol agents to see the illegal crossings, then the crossings can't be recorded.

NumbersUSA is currently pushing for a Congressional investigation into this major breach of border security. The fence needs to be fixed, and Boeing needs to pay for it!

We need all Americans to watch it and consider its ramifications. Whether it be smuggling of illegal drugs, national security, or illegal immigration, every American should be shocked and demand answers!

Video link at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdc-kv7nzaU

Previously Deported Alien Caught Transporting Methamphetamine Through Sherman County Sentenced to Serve 78 Months in Federal Prison

PORTLAND, Ore. – Guadalupe Navarro (a.k.a. “Mari Vasquez”), 50, of Tulare, California, was sentenced on January 20, 2011, by U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown to 78 months in prison, for methamphetamine trafficking and illegal re-entry after deportation.

On the evening of October 3, 2010, a Sherman County Sheriff’s Office deputy stopped defendant’s vehicle for a traffic infraction. Defendant provided false identification, and deputies ultimately discovered her true identity and an outstanding warrant for her arrest. During a search of her vehicle, deputies seized one pound of methamphetamine and three pounds of marijuana. A criminal history check also revealed that she had a prior felony conviction in 2003 for unlawfully manufacturing methamphetamine after which she was deported to Mexico. Subsequently, defendant illegally returned to the United States.

Soon after her arrest in Sherman County, local authorities learned defendant was a target in an investigation initiated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Fresno, California. In the summer of 2010, DEA agents obtained authorization to conduct wiretaps on several members of a Mexican National Drug Trafficking Organization (DTO) operating in southern California. Defendant was intercepted in many incriminating calls, including conversations in which she described in coded language the quality of methamphetamine she was selling, price points, and growing frustration with her sources of supply.

“This conviction is the result of the excellent police work by the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office in conjunction with DEA agents in Fresno,” said U.S. Attorney Amanda Marshall. “This teamwork is essential to stemming the flow of methamphetamine coming north from Mexico into the Pacific Northwest and beyond.”

This case was investigated by the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office, DEA Fresno, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The case was prosecuted by Assistant U. S. Attorney Leah K. Bolstad.


 

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