Oregon

Honesty, patriotism define Oregon's sanctuary repeal effort

“In life you need either inspiration or desperation,” declares self-help guru Tony Robbins.
 
Bereft of the former, the liberal group Our Oregon has embraced the latter.
 
For the past year, Oregonians for Immigration Reform, a group that advocates policies to stem illegal immigration, has worked to qualify a measure for the November ballot that will enable voters to repeal Oregon Revised Statute 181A.820, the state’s illegal-immigrant sanctuary law. Our Oregon has sought to demonize OFIR’s effort by tarring the thoroughly mainstream organization as a “white supremacist hate group.”
 
The backbone of OFIR’s campaign has been the scores of volunteers who have circulated the petition and worked to gather the 88,000 signatures needed to certify the measure for the ballot. Those volunteers, of whom I am one, are motivated not by “hate” but by patriotism — and by the knowledge that Americans of all races benefit from laws that work to ensure an orderly influx of immigrants to our country. Tens of thousands of rank-and-file Oregonians have been excited to sign the petition and lend their names and support to sanctuary repeal.
 
To supplement the volunteers’ work, last year the campaign contracted with a company that employs paid signature gatherers — a small minority of whom, as the Herald and News reported in a recent story (“Investigation targets ‘sanctuary state’ repeal effort,” June 2), may have sought to misrepresent the measure as protecting, not repealing, the sanctuary law.
 
Lee Vasche, the company’s owner, “acknowledged complaints about misrepresentation in general,” the story reported. “Most were the fault of one signature gatherer, Vasche said, adding the company fired two other circulators and destroyed about 400 signatures” that may have been obtained under false pretenses.
 
But Our Oregon now suggests, with no evidence whatever, that Vasche may have known and approved of efforts to misrepresent the measure. Indeed, argues a complaint the group submitted to the state Department of Justice, “it is difficult to imagine a scenario” in which this was not the case.
 
This is baseless conjecture. Many ballot-measure campaigns employ paid signature gatherers. Those employees work on their own absent close supervision. The great majority are scrupulous to represent their measures fairly and accurately. A very few, however, are not. Their indiscretions do not reflect on the veracity of their employers or negate the value of the campaigns with which they are or have been associated.
 
I have worked with Lee Vasche since 2009, when I joined him on OFIR’s board of directors. He has long been one of Oregon’s premier political-marketing professionals. His integrity is beyond reproach. For Our Oregon to allege he was complicit in a strategy to deceive voters besmirches the reputation of an honest man. And it reveals the desperate measures to which the group will resort to keep sanctuary repeal off November’s ballot.
 
As for the measure itself? Oregon’s sanctuary statute forbids Oregon’s police departments and sheriff’s offices to use their resources to detect and apprehend reputedly “noncriminal” illegal immigrants. In doing so, it helps illegal immigrants escape the consequences of their lawbreaking — and encourages even more of them to come here.
 
Repealing the statute would free our police and sheriffs to take the initiative to help enforce immigration law. And it would send the clear message that lawbreakers of any kind will not get a free pass in Oregon’s communities.
 
To help get sanctuary repeal onto the ballot, interested voters should print a single-signature petition (available at StopOregonSanctuaries.org), sign it, and mail it to the campaign’s headquarters by July 2.
 
 
Richard F. LaMountain is a former vice president of Oregonians for Immigration Reform. In 2014, he was a chief sponsor of the ballot measure via which Oregon voters rejected illegal-immigrant driver cards.

Oregon group says immigration laws must be enforced

ALBANY, Ore. – While many are calling for changes in how illegal immigrants are being treated as they cross the border, others in more rural parts of Oregon disagree. Several people in Albany, said people need to come into the United States legally and that current immigration laws should be enforced.

"I'm sad about the protests,” explained Judy, who asked KGW to only use her first name. “I'm all for immigration, but I want it to be legal and I think that we have laws on the books that need to be enforced.”

“My great grandparents were immigrants, they came through Ellis Island from Italy, and even back then they had rules that they had to follow and I think legal immigration is what we need,” said Kathy, who also asked she only be identified by her first name.

A group called Oregonians for Immigration Reform echoed that sentiment.

"We're seeing right now this big hub bub about the issue of children being separated from their parents when they cross the border illegally, well, any time somebody breaks the law and they're incarcerated, they're always separated from their children,” said Jim Ludwick, a spokesman for Oregonians for Immigration Reform.

The group is also currently collecting signatures to get a measure on the ballot to repeal Oregon’s sanctuary state status.

“We feel we're on the path to collecting enough signatures,” Ludwick said. “We've got to get a little over 88,000. We think we're going to qualify and we are convinced if we qualify to get this on the ballot, we will prevail.”

The group would not say how many signatures it has collected so far, but believes it will be able to get enough to put Oregon’s sanctuary state status in the hands of voters.

Guest column: Voters should repeal Oregon sanctuary law

Should Oregon law provide sanctuary to illegal immigrants? This year, voters may get the chance to decide.
 
Activists affiliated with Oregonians for Immigration Reform are collecting signatures to seek to qualify a measure for the November ballot that would enable voters to repeal Oregon Revised Statute 181A.820. That law prohibits state and local law enforcement agencies from working to detect and apprehend “persons whose only violation of law is that they are persons of foreign citizenship present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.”
 
To begin, let’s clarify: If voters were to repeal ORS 181A.820, Oregon’s police departments and sheriff’s offices would not be required to help U.S. authorities enforce immigration law. Repeal would enable them, instead, to choose to detect and detain illegal immigrants on the basis of their illegal entry or visa overstay and to relinquish them to federal agents for removal from the country.
 
Is this a legitimate role for local law enforcement? In United States v. Vasquez-Alvarez (1999), the 10th Circuit Court recognized a “pre-existing general authority of state or local police officers to investigate and make arrests for violations of federal law, including immigration laws.” And in Arizona v. United States (2012), the U.S. Supreme Court held that local law enforcement officers may seek to determine the immigration status of someone they stop, detain or arrest if they have a clearly defined “reasonable suspicion” that the person is an illegal immigrant.
 
Suppose, after a repeal of ORS 181A.820, that many police and sheriffs chose to exercise their new power and that, as a result, the number of illegal immigrants in Oregon fell. What would be the practical effect of this on rank-and-file Oregonians?
 
On a routine basis, illegal immigration is precursory to other crimes — crimes that can impact Oregonians profoundly. “Virtually all adult illegal aliens commit felonies in order to procure the documents they need to get jobs, to drive and to obtain other benefits,” writes Ronald Mortensen, a fellow with the Center for Immigration Studies. Indeed, notes Mortensen, “the Social Security Administration and New York Times report that approximately 75 percent of illegal aliens have fraudulently obtained Social Security numbers.”
 
The U.S. Treasury Department’s Inspector General for Tax Administration, CNS News’ Terence Jeffrey reports, that between 2011 and 2016 there were “more than 1.3 million cases of identity theft perpetrated by illegal aliens … ineligible to work in the United States.”
 
A recent study by the Federation for American Immigration Reform found that the percentage of illegal immigrants incarcerated by states and localities is some 50 percent higher than the percentage of native-born Americans incarcerated. That’s borne out in Oregon, where illegal immigrants are estimated to comprise some 4 percent of the state’s population but, last month, accounted for 6.5 percent of the state prison population. Of those illegal-immigrant inmates, more than three-quarters were serving time for homicide, assault, robbery, kidnapping, rape, sodomy and sex abuse.
 
Illegal-immigrant crime wreaks havoc on too many law-abiding Oregonians. For voters to repeal the state’s sanctuary law — and give our law enforcement agencies the freedom to detect, apprehend and help remove illegal immigrants on the basis of immigration law violations alone — would be a major step toward a safer Oregon.
 
For information about the petition campaign to repeal ORS 181A.820, go to StopOregonSanctuaries.org.
 
— Richard F. LaMountain is a former vice president of Oregonians for Immigration Reform 

University Of Oregon Attacks OFIR

Alert date: 
2018-05-17
Alert body: 

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON'S TRADEMARK-INFRINGEMENT LAWSUIT THREAT FRIVOLOUS, POSSIBLY POLITICALLY MOTIVATED,  ALLEGES OREGONIANS FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM

Oregonians for Immigration Reform, the state's largest group advocating for immigration reductions, today condemned the University of Oregon for threatening to sue the group for trademark infringement.

"Last week, the University of Oregon notified OFIR that it would sue if our group did not immediately stop using the letter 'O,' with a depiction of a fir tree inside it, as part of our logo," said Cynthia Kendoll, OFIR's president.  "Our 'O,' the university claims, too closely resembles the 'O' it uses as its own logo."  Images of both logos appear at the end of this release.

"This is ridiculous," continued Kendoll.  "The 'O' in our logo and in the university's are in different fonts.  Our 'O,' unlike the university's, features a graphic inside.

"How, on the mere basis of a capital 'O' in both our logos, could any reasonable person confuse OFIR with the University of Oregon -- or believe the institutions are affiliated?  Does the university really believe it has the right to trademark a letter of the alphabet?

"Most importantly, do Oregonians want the state's flagship institution of higher learning to use their hard-earned tax money to bully an all-volunteer citizens' group over such a trivial matter?"

OFIR communications director Jim Ludwick suggested that politics, not trademark infringement, may be the real reason the university issued its lawsuit threat.

"In its cease-and-desist letter to OFIR, the university mentioned as one reason for its action the Southern Poverty Law Center's recent classification of OFIR as a 'hate' group," said Ludwick.  "But if the university had conducted even a cursory examination of the SPLC's tactics, it would have found the outfit exists mainly to smear patriotic Americans as 'racists' and 'xenophobes.'  Even mainstream liberals agree the SPLC inhabits the left-wing fringe.  If the university's lawsuit threat was truly about trademark infringement, why would its letter to us have mentioned the SPLC?"

In 2014, Ludwick noted, OFIR activists referred a measure to the statewide ballot via which Oregonians rejected illegal-alien driving privileges by a two-to-one margin.  This year, he continued, the group is collecting voters' signatures in an effort to qualify yet another measure -- to repeal the state's illegal-alien sanctuary law -- for this November's ballot.  "Given our record of success fighting illegal immigration in the political realm," asked Ludwick, "might the real reason for the university's action be to distract OFIR's attention from its ballot-measure campaign -- and thereby to chill a volunteer group's effort to influence public policy via direct democracy?"

"If so," concluded Ludwick, "it won't work.  We'll continue our fight against illegal immigration.  We'll get our measure onto the ballot.  And we'll continue to use the logo we use today."

Oregonians for Immigration Reform, founded in 2000, undertakes public-policy action to cut the excessive levels of legal immigration and end illegal immigration.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Homicide Report December 2017

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on December 1, 2017 that 136 of the 973 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for homicidal crimes (various degrees of murder and manslaughter), 13.98 percent of the criminal alien prison population.

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on December 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

December 1, 2017

973

136

13.98%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates incarcerated on December 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

Multnomah

39

28.68%

Marion

22

16.18%

Washington

22

16.18%

Umatilla

9

6.62%

Clackamas

7

5.15%

Jackson

6

4.41%

Lane

5

3.68%

Klamath

3

2.21%

Linn

3

2.21%

Yamhill

3

2.21%

Benton

2

1.47%

Josephine

2

1.47%

Lincoln

2

1.47%

Polk

2

1.47%

Clatsop

1

0.74%

Coos

1

0.74%

Douglas

1

0.74%

Gilliam

1

0.74%

Hood River

1

0.74%

Jefferson

1

0.74%

Malheur

1

0.74%

OOS (Not a County)

1

0.74%

Tillamook

1

0.74%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Crook

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Deschutes

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Lake

0

0.00%

Morrow

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wasco

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

136

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 136 criminal alien inmates by number and percentage incarcerated on December 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

 

Mexico

106

77.94%

 

Cuba

4

2.94%

 

Canada

3

2.21%

 

Vietnam

3

2.21%

 

Cambodia

2

1.47%

 

El Salvador

2

1.47%

 

Guatemala

2

1.47%

 

Laos

2

1.47%

 

South Korea

2

1.47%

 

China

1

0.74%

 

Costa Rica

1

0.74%

 

Japan

1

0.74%

 

Mariana Islands

1

0.74%

 

Marshall Islands

1

0.74%

 

Nicaragua

1

0.74%

 

Nigeria

1

0.74%

 

Peru

1

0.74%

 

South Africa

1

0.74%

 

Turkey

1

0.74%

 

Total

136

100.00%

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 December 17.

Criminal aliens from 19 different countries have committed homicidal violence against residents in the state of Oregon.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

Ajo Agents Arrest Illegal Alien Convicted of Rape and Assault

TUCSON, Ariz. – Border Patrol agents assigned to the Ajo Station arrested a Mexican man Sunday morning with a conviction for rape and assault in Marion County, Oregon in 2012.

Agents patrolling in Lukeville, Arizona, arrested five men illegally present in the United States. During processing, agents conducted a records check on 31-year-old Pascual Nava-Gutierrez, which revealed his earlier conviction of rape in the 3rd degree and assault in the 4th degree.

Nava will remain in federal custody pending prosecution for criminal immigration violations involving re-entry of an aggravated felon.

All persons apprehended by the Border Patrol undergo criminal history checks using biometrics to ensure illegal immigrants with criminal histories are positively identified.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.
 

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Homicide Report August 2017

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on August 1, 2017 that 138 of the 984 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for homicidal crimes (various degrees of murder and manslaughter), 14.02 percent of the criminal alien prison population.

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on August 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

August 1, 2017

984

138

14.02%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates incarcerated on August 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

Multnomah

40

28.99%

Marion

22

15.94%

Washington

21

15.22%

Umatilla

11

7.97%

Clackamas

7

5.07%

Jackson

6

4.35%

Lane

5

3.62%

Klamath

3

2.17%

Linn

3

2.17%

Yamhill

3

2.17%

Benton

2

1.45%

Josephine

2

1.45%

Lincoln

2

1.45%

Polk

2

1.45%

Clatsop

1

0.72%

Coos

1

0.72%

Douglas

1

0.72%

Gilliam

1

0.72%

Hood River

1

0.72%

Jefferson

1

0.72%

Malheur

1

0.72%

OOS (Not a County)

1

0.72%

Tillamook

1

0.72%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Crook

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Deschutes

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Lake

0

0.00%

Morrow

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wasco

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

138

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 138 criminal alien inmates by number and percentage incarcerated on August 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

 

Mexico

108

78.26%

 

Cuba

4

2.90%

 

Canada

3

2.17%

 

Vietnam

3

2.17%

 

Cambodia

2

1.45%

 

El Salvador

2

1.45%

 

Guatemala

2

1.45%

 

Laos

2

1.45%

 

South Korea

2

1.45%

 

China

1

0.72%

 

Costa Rica

1

0.72%

 

Japan

1

0.72%

 

Mariana Islands

1

0.72%

 

Marshall Islands

1

0.72%

 

Nicaragua

1

0.72%

 

Nigeria

1

0.72%

 

Peru

1

0.72%

 

South Africa

1

0.72%

 

Turkey

1

0.72%

 

Total

138

100.00%

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Criminal aliens from 18 different countries have committed homicidal violence against residents in the state of Oregon.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

Fight Over Oregon's 'Sanctuary Law' Brings Immigration Policy Battle To The NW

At a booth at the recent state fair in Salem, people waited in line at a booth for Oregonians for Immigration Reform to sign the group’s proposed ballot measure to repeal Oregon’s so-called “sanctuary law.”

Cynthia Kendoll, the group’s president, said this new measure is attracting more intense interest than its previous attempts to discourage illegal immigration.

“This is something that people are truly really concerned about,” said Kendoll, “and I have just been amazed here at the state fair that people walk up and say, ‘Just let me sign this. I am so sick of this.’”

Oregon may not seem like it is on the front lines of the battle over immigration policy. But the state appears headed toward a bitter election fight on the issue that could reverberate nationally. 

During his presidential campaign last year, Donald Trump put a harsh spotlight on jurisdictions that didn’t fully cooperate with federal immigration officials. In recent weeks, he’s wavered on some immigration issues — such as moving to cut a deal with Democrats on protecting immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. But his administration continues to attack so-called sanctuary laws.

Andrea Williams, one of the chief opponents of the measure, said the looming ballot fight sets up a choice for voters between going with the Trump administration or sticking with law she says reflects “Oregon values” and has long worked well.

“To me, the issue is very simple,” added Williams, executive director of Causa, a Salem-based immigrant rights group.  “Do we want to spend Oregon resources to do the federal government’s job?”

Oregon 30 years ago adopted a law limiting local and state police involvement with federal enforcement. It was the first statewide law of its kind, but it attracted little attention or controversy. Supporters said the law was needed because some local police officers were detaining Latinos simply based on their appearance.

The term sanctuary came into vogue much later as many cities began resisting large-scale deportations. Critics charged that sanctuary cities were shielding criminals and Trump highlighted the issue in his campaign. 

“We will end the sanctuary cities that have resulted in so many needless deaths,” Trump vowed. At the Republican convention last year, the relatives of people who had been killed by immigrants illegally in the country were prominently featured on stage.

Just a few weeks later, Oregonians for Immigration Reform began laying the groundwork for an initiative to abolish the state law.

Trump’s focus “gave us the backup that this is truly something that people are concerned about,” said Kendoll.

Opponents are gearing up to fight the measure and their feelings are also intense.

“Their ultimate goal is to get rid of immigrants because they want white nationalism in this state,” said state Rep. Diego Hernandez, D-Portland.  He argued that Oregon’s sanctuary law helps encourage cooperation with local police.

Causa is helping assemble a broad coalition to oppose the measure. Williams, the group’s executive director, has signed up a sort of who’s who of the major political backers of the Democratic political leadership of the state: the public employee unions, environmental groups as well as gay and abortion rights advocates.

She says her group got a wake-up call three years ago when Oregon voters rejected a new law providing driver’s licenses for people in the country illegally.

The idea was to give people a form of identification that would allow them to drive legally to work and get auto insurance. But Oregonians for Immigration Reform, charging that it only enabled illegal immigration, put the issue on the ballot and won in a landslide.

“We do have to get better at talking to Oregonians about the circumstances — why people here are undocumented and why they have limited solutions to adjust their status,” Williams said. If the sanctuary issue gets on the ballot, she said, her coalition will have to do a lot more to reach out to Oregonians to talk about the lives of immigrants and the economic benefits she said they bring to the state.

Surveys taken in Oregon and in the country as a whole generally show strong support for immigration reform that would provide some sort of path to legal status for people in the country without citizenship. But the sanctuary issue is different.

That became clear in staunchly Democratic California this year. After Trump was elected, the state Senate’s leader, Los Angeles Democrat Kevin de Léon, introduced a statewide sanctuary bill. But instead of winning swift passage and serving as a rebuke to Trump, it languished for months.

It faced strong opposition from many California law enforcement officials and one independent poll in March showed voters strongly divided on the issue. A watered-down version didn’t pass until the final hours of the legislative session on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017.

It’s still a long time until Oregon’s anti-sanctuary initiative could go before voters in November 2018. But there’s been plenty of early maneuvering around the issue.

Kendoll’s group was the first to take advantage of a new petitioning rule from Secretary of State Dennis Richardson that allows them to collect signatures while waiting for the ballot title to be finalized. Several groups are challenging Richardson’s rule. If they’re successful, it could put a major crimp in the petition drive.

Perhaps more crucially, critics of the measure are accusing Oregonians for Immigration Reform of having ties to white nationalism. They say the group has accepted aid from groups and individuals concerned about the changing racial composition of the country.

Kendoll denied that her group is motivated by racial animus.

We’re going after people who are here illegally,” she said. “Their race, their ethnicity, their religion — anything — has nothing to do with it. It’s, ‘are you in our country legally?’”

That leads Kendoll to some hard-line views. She said the estimated 11 million people who entered the country illegally should leave, and she supports ending the program allowing those brought here as children to gain legal status. In addition, she backs legislation that would cut legal immigration by half over the next decade.

“When you allow such a large number of people to immigrate legally,” she said, “assimilation is more difficult because they tend to clump together and not assimilate.”

The sanctuary issue provides a hot-button path toward that goal.

At the Oregonians for Immigration Reform booth, volunteers displayed the mugshot of Sergio Martinez and called him their “poster boy.”

He’s the man accused of sexually assaulting a 65-year-old woman after being released from the Multnomah County Jail despite being frequently deported. Focusing on this one extreme example infuriates opponents.

“They play off peoples’ fears. That’s how they win,” said Causa’s Williams. She said this line of attack unfairly stereotypes people who enter the country illegally, especially since research shows they are actually less likely to commit crimes. 

If Oregon’s 30-year-old sanctuary law is repealed, the result would likely be a patchwork of local policies. Counties and cities would be able to decide on their own how or if they wanted to limit their involvement with federal immigration enforcement.

The initiative needs 88,184 signatures by next July to qualify for the ballot. Kendoll isn’t saying how many signatures they’ve collected so far.

Woodburn police chief aims to build trust after news of DACA repeal

The recent decision by the federal government to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals causes me to once again reflect on the relationship between our immigrant communities and local law enforcement.

As I am out and about in the greater Woodburn community, I hear of continued confusion, fear and mistrust of government among immigrant communities.

Critical to our mission as local police officers is the notion that people in our community, particularly our immigrant communities, trust us and not fear us. Trust cultivates an environment of cooperation with victims and witnesses of crime, cooperation that we desperately need to keep our community safe.

The ongoing controversies surrounding immigration issues in our country unfortunately plays counter to that mission, resulting in emotions encouraging fear — not trust — and stifling any such cooperation.

Oregon law, which we follow and enforce, guides us in our daily work of keeping our community safe. ORS 181A.820 helps reinforce the goal of mutual trust and respect between local law enforcement and immigrant communities.

This Oregon law specifically prohibits local law enforcement from engaging solely in administrative immigration matters.

The statute does, however, allow for local law enforcement involvement in immigration matters when circumstances of a crime are present, including a person subject to arrest pursuant to a warrant issued by a federal magistrate.

The decisions surrounding immigration policy and its future are mired in politics well beyond the reach of local law enforcement. What is within the reach of both local law enforcement and our immigrant communities are opportunities to continue fostering mutual trust and respect.

Now is the time for us to come together and work hard to overcome any fear and mistrust of local law enforcement.

We can do this together through building and maintaining positive relationships, being transparent, practicing the tenets of police legitimacy and procedural justice, and working in partnership to keep our community a safe place to live, work and visit.

Jim Ferraris is the chief of the Woodburn Police Department. To read the Oregon statues mentioned in this letter, go to www.oregonlaws.org
 

What sanctuaries would cost Oregonians under new DOJ rule

A new day is dawning for sanctuary jurisdictions that have taken advantage of grant money from the federal government but declined to cooperate as they should with federal immigration law enforcement.
 
Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a new rule July 25 for jurisdictions applying for Byrne grants to assist state and local law enforcement. Byrne grants, formally called Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Programs (“Byrne JAG”), are the largest source of federal criminal justice funds for state, local, and tribal authorities.
 
There are quite a few jurisdictions in Oregon that used money from these grants in 2016, so now they need to take another look at their uncooperative policies with federal authorities in regard to immigration.
 
Taxpayers could be hit with bigger bills than ever if the affected jurisdictions fail to meet Department of Justice requirements for the grants and do not receive any.  And citizens in these locations can expect increases in numbers of illegal aliens in their communities, if a jurisdiction chooses to “go it alone” and continues its sanctuary policies.
 
Thanks to the Center for Immigration Studies for their detailed examination of which jurisdictions could lose how much money each year by losing the Byrne grants.
 
In Oregon, jurisdictions that received significant amounts from the Byrne program in 2016 and now must show proper cooperation with DOJ or lose the grants, are:
 
City of Portland $465,810 
Lane County $84,217 
City of Salem $69,968 
County of Washington $39,976 
Deschutes. County of $33,730 
Clackamas County Juvenile Department $25,771 
City of Grants Pass $17,547 
City of Beaverton $17,239  
City of Redmond $11,874 
 

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