enforcement

22 charged in multi-state scheme to obtain real driver's licenses with fraudulent documents

NEWARK, N.J. — Twenty-two individuals were charged and arrests were made in six states Wednesday in connection with an alleged scheme to fraudulently obtain driver's licenses for illegal aliens and other ineligible individuals, New Jersey U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman announced.

The investigation was conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Document and Benefit Task Force; FBI; Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS); New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission; and Bergen County Prosecutor's Office.

Seventeen arrests were made in New Jersey, New York, California, Nevada, Virginia and Georgia, including a contract employee of USCIS charged with stealing and providing forms used to aid in the scheme. The charged criminal operation allegedly provided a suite of unlawful services to individuals illegally residing in the United States, including fraudulently obtaining driver's licenses, and investor and student visas.

"Today's arrests are a reflection of how ICE Homeland Security Investigations continues to prioritize and work with our law enforcement partners to identify and dismantle those organizations engaged in document and identity fraud," said Andrew McLees, special agent in charge of HSI Newark. "Fraudulent documents give people the appearance of lawful status and provide them with opportunities to which they are not entitled. This investigation prevented masses of additional fraudulent documents from being used, and possibly threatening security at the local, regional and national levels. HSI works closely with federal, state and local agencies to combat immigration fraud, protect the integrity of the immigration system and punish those who profit from promoting fraudulent schemes."

"By gaining access to protected, blank government immigration forms, the subjects in this case were able to utilize sophisticated computer software to create false identity documents and subsequently move to receive legitimate driver's licenses," said FBI Special Agent in Charge Ward. "In doing so, they were able to circumvent established safeguards and proper vetting put into place post 9/11. The exploitation of this vulnerability is significant because identity-type frauds are a gateway crime. Seldom are they the end game. Individuals with falsely obtained identities are more likely to commit financial frauds, walk away from legal obligations, and are more difficult for law enforcement to identify and investigate."

According to the complaints unsealed today:

Young-Kyu Park, formerly a resident of Fort Lee, N.J., and currently a resident of Los Angeles, was the leader of a criminal enterprise ("the Park Criminal Enterprise") operating in Palisades Park and Fort Lee, N.J., as well as in other states. The Park Criminal Enterprise illegally obtained driver's licenses genuinely issued by New Jersey, New York, Virginia, Nevada and elsewhere. To do so, it acquired, created and counterfeited a variety of documents for sale to customers. Members of the Park Criminal Enterprise also escorted customers to various state motor vehicle agencies and coached them through obtaining the licenses. In return, customers each paid the Park Criminal Enterprise a fee of approximately $3,000 to $4,500 for the unlawful services.

In particular, Young-Kyu Park fraudulently obtained, completed and sold genuine I-797 forms for customers to use to get licenses. An I-797 form is used by the federal government – including USCIS – to communicate with others or convey an immigration benefit. State agencies that issue driver's licenses rely on these forms to verify the authenticity of an applicant's foreign passport and to verify the applicant's lawful presence in the United States. One version of this form can be used to show eligibility for in-state college tuition.

The Park Criminal Enterprise also altered and counterfeited other immigration documents, including passports, and created and provided fictitious documents to customers – such as fictitious utility bills and bank statements used to establish residency requirements. In furtherance of the scheme, Young-Kyu Park and his co-conspirators fraudulently extended expired Korean passports of individuals without legal status in the United States so they could obtain driver's licenses. These illegal services were, at times, advertised in Korean newspapers and online with headings such as, "New Jersey Driver's License."

Young-Kyu Park obtained blank I-797 forms from Karine Michmichian and Martin Trejo, a USCIS contract employee, working at the USCIS' Western Forms Center in Montclair, Calif. – the United States' largest warehouse storage facility for these forms. At various times, Young-Kyu Park ordered the forms from Michmichian, who contacted Trejo.

For example, on Feb. 2, 2012, Young-Kyu Park called a cell phone used by Michmichian. Approximately two minutes later she sent a text message to a cell phone used by Trejo, stating, "Need 200 (A) call me asap, please, valentines is coming," – an alleged reference to the purchase of approximately 200 I-797A forms. Young-Kyu Park then used a computer to print customers' information onto the blank, stolen forms.

The Park Criminal Enterprise maintained a network of co-conspirators in New Jersey, Nevada, Georgia and Virginia that met with customers. Young-Kyu Park often communicated with his co-conspirators in various states through email. For example, on Nov. 3, 2011, Young-Kyu Park sent an email to a cooperating witness, stating, "Not sure if [you] have received [the customer's] passport from Director Kim [Ki-Sok Kim]. Must receive the passport and extend it. When extending passport . . . [sic] set the period to 11/3/2011-11/2/2016 . . [sic] issue date should be 11/2/2011." In the same email, Young-Kyu Park directed the cooperating witness to then send the altered passport, via Federal Express, to Ho-man Lee, a co-conspirator in Alexandria, Va., who helped customers to illegally get licenses in that state.

Members of the Park Criminal Enterprise, including Young-Kyu Park's wife, Soong-Young Park, and his daughter, Hanna Park, laundered the proceeds of the illegal operation to distribute the proceeds and conceal the scheme. The criminal complaint charges the following offenses:

Count one charges the named defendants with conspiracy to unlawfully produce identification documents (driver's licenses) and false identification documents (passports). The charge carries a maximum potential penalty of 15 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count two charges the named defendants with conspiracy to steal government property and to transport and receive stolen property in interstate commerce. The charge carries a maximum potential penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count three charges the named defendants with conspiracy to commit money laundering. The charge carries a maximum potential penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

The charges and allegations contained in the complaint are merely accusations, and the defendants are considered innocent unless and until proven guilty.
 

No matter what the spin, enforcement wins!

Alert date: 
July 1, 2012
Alert body: 

Read the intelligent analysis and summary of the Supreme Court's decision about Arizona's immigration law in the Statesman's Guest Opinion section dated 6/28/2102.  Or click here to read it in OFIR's letter section.

Heavily-armed Texas gunboats now patrol Rio Grande

SOUTH TEXAS -- Ask Kyle McCarty where he worked just a few months ago and he’ll tell you about patrolling the roads around Odessa as a state trooper.

"Yes, sir," says McCarty, an affable young man with a Texas twang just two years into his career with the Department of Public Safety. "Just regular road crew, black and white."

Today, he’s patrolling a place utterly unlike the highways of the Texas Panhandle, piloting an armored gunboat bristling with automatic weapons around the Rio Grande, watching out for drug runners.

Call him one of the new cops on the border beat, zipping around the water in a shallow water boat that looks more like a military vehicle driving the streets of Baghdad. Surrounding him is a crew of fellow troopers who usually wear flak jackets as they man large-caliber machine guns that can fire up to 900 rounds a minute.

"Typically, the boats operating in the Rio Grande River are operating with six M-240, 30-caliber automatic machine guns," explains Lt. Charley Goble, the DPS officer in command of the newly deployed force of gunboats on the Rio Grande.

Texas now has a small navy of gunboats patrolling the Rio Grande and the Intercoastal Waterway. Right now, the DPS has four of the 34-foot shallow water vessels, but the fleet will soon grow to six. Each of the boats, equipped with armor-plating, night vision equipment and a small arsenal of weaponry, costs about $580,000 in state and federal funds.

Troopers patrolling the border say the expense is justified, considering the ruthless nature of their adversaries in the Mexican drug cartels. What they fear, more than anything else, is the prospect of an ambush.

"They’ve got radios, they’ve got their telephones, there’s somebody right here in this abandoned house right here," Goble says, gesturing to people hanging around on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. "There’s somebody there now. They’re watching what we’re doing."

They’re watching, troopers explain, mainly because they’re providing real-time intelligence to smugglers who dump bales of drugs into the river and let the current carry them to the U.S. shoreline. Smugglers typically steal trucks in south Texas, load them up with drugs on the river and drive inland.

If they’re caught close to the border, many of the smugglers make a run back to the river, speeding down the dusty roads and crashing their trucks into the water. Then they climb out of their vehicles and quickly unload their contraband cargo, helped by confederates splashing into the river from the Mexican side. They haul their bales of dope back onto the dry land in Mexico, ready to try again another day.

"They fear Texas law enforcement, but not as much as they fear going back and saying they’ve lost their load," Goble says. "Everything’s at stake. They will go to any extreme to get away from law enforcement and to get the contraband back to the owner."

The desperate flights back to the river happen so often, troopers have nicknamed them "splashdowns." Law enforcement authorities have recorded more than 60 of these escapes in the last three years. Troopers point out rusting hulks of abandoned trucks on the U.S. shore where fleeing smugglers have abandoned their stolen vehicles.

So the cat and mouse game on the border continues. Troopers now watch for smugglers from their heavily armed gunboats. And smugglers position spotters to watch for the gunboats.

"They’re in constant communication," Goble says. "If they see us operating in a particular location on the river, they’ll just push it 10 miles either end of us. They’ve got their techniques down to a science, almost. They can move a load of dope across the river in just a matter of minutes. And they can have it completed prior to us even arriving."

 

More than 7 in 10 U.S. teens will be jobless this summer

WASHINGTON — Once a rite of passage to adulthood, summer jobs for teens are disappearing.

Fewer than three in 10 American teenagers now hold jobs such as running cash registers, mowing lawns or busing restaurant tables from June to August. The decline has been particularly sharp since 2000, with employment for 16-to-19-year olds falling to the lowest level since World War II.

And teen employment may never return to pre-recession levels, suggests a projection by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The drop in teen employment, steeper than for other age groups, is partly a cultural shift. More youths are spending summer months in school, at music or learning camps or in other activities geared for college. But the decline is especially troubling for teens for whom college may be out of reach, leaving them increasingly idle and with few options to earn wages and job experience.

Older workers, immigrants and debt-laden college graduates are taking away lower-skill work as they struggle to find their own jobs in the weak economy. Upper-income white teens are three times as likely to have summer jobs as poor black teens, sometimes capitalizing on their parents’ social networks for help.

Overall, more than 44 percent of teens who want summer jobs don’t get them or work fewer hours than they prefer.

“It’s really frustrating,” said Colleen Knaggs, describing her fruitless efforts to find work for the past two years. The 18-year-old graduated from high school last week in Flagstaff, Ariz., the state that ranks highest in the share of U.S. teens who are unable to get the summer work they desire, at 58 percent.

Wanting to be better prepared to live on her own and to save for college, Knaggs says she submitted a dozen applications for summer cashier positions. She was turned down for what she believes was her lack of connections and work experience. Instead of working this summer, she’ll now be babysitting her 10-year-old brother, which has been the extent of her work so far, aside from volunteering at concession stands.

“I feel like sometimes they don’t want to go through the training,” said Knaggs, who is now bracing for a heavier debt load when she attends college in the fall.

Economists say teens who aren’t getting jobs are often those who could use them the most. Many are not moving on to more education.

“I have big concerns about this generation of young people,” said Harry Holzer, labor economist and public policy professor at Georgetown University. He said the income gap between rich and poor is exacerbated when lower-income youths who are less likely to enroll in college are unable to get skills and training.

“For young high school graduates or dropouts, their early work experience is more closely tied to their success in the labor market,” he said.

Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University, said better job pathways are needed for teens who don’t attend four-year colleges, including paid internships for high school seniors and increased post-secondary training in technical institutes.

“We are truly in a labor market depression for teens,” he said. “More than others, teens are frequently off the radar screens of the nation’s and states’ economic policymakers.”

Washington, D.C., was the jurisdiction most likely to have teens wanting summer work but unable to get it or working fewer hours than desired, with more than three in five in that situation. It was followed by Arizona, California, Washington state, Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina and Nevada.

On the other end of the scale, Wyoming, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Nebraska, South Dakota and Kansas had teens who were more often able to find work. All those states have fewer immigrant workers.

The figures are based on an analysis of Census Bureau Current Population Survey data from June to August 2011 by Northeastern’s Center for Labor Market Studies. They are supplemented with research from Christopher Smith and Daniel Aaronson, two Federal Reserve economists, as well as interviews with Labor Department economists and Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a national job placement firm.

About 5.1 million, or just 29.6 percent, of 16-to-19 year olds were employed last summer. Adjusted for seasonal factors, the rate dips to 25.7 percent. In 1978, the share reached a peak of nearly 60 percent before waves of immigration brought in new low-skill workers. Teen employment remained generally above 50 percent until 2001, dropping sharply to fresh lows after each of the past two recessions.

Out of more than 3.5 million underutilized teens who languished in the job market last summer, 1.7 million were unemployed, nearly 700,000 worked fewer hours than desired and 1.1 million wanted jobs but had given up looking. That 3.5 million represented a teen underutilization rate of 44 percent, up from roughly 25 percent in 2000.

By race and income, blacks, Hispanics and teens in lower-income families were least likely to be employed in summer jobs. The figure was 14 percent for African-American teens when their family income was less than $40,000 a year, compared to 44 percent of white teens with family income of $100,000-$150,000.
 

Obama's Administrative Dream Act Myths

The Obama administration's latest attempt at amnesty is a lawless act and an end run around American citizens and their representatives in Congress. It is also a hostile act toward the millions of legal residents looking for jobs. Legalizing illegal aliens is unpopular and this plan may well drive voters away from the Obama campaign. If this were not the case, Obama would have announced his administrative amnesty plan on a Monday morning and followed with a week of fanfare; instead, the White House decided to drop this bombshell on a Friday afternoon while refusing to take questions from the press.

The amnesty memo, "Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion with Respect to Individuals Who Came to the United States as Children", is available online. Though details are scarce, the plan raises a number of questions.

If the plan were narrowly-tailored and designed to benefit only young people brought her by their parents, the plan might find some support. Unfortunately, the president's plan is much more broad in scope than its supporters are willing to admit. Some of the myths spread by supporters are addressed here.

"It will only benefit 800,000 people." The White House is claiming that this administrative DREAM Act amnesty will benefit 800,000 illegal aliens, but the Pew Hispanic Center estimates that 1.4 million people will qualify for the amnesty. These estimates assume no fraud, and the number of individuals who will ultimately benefit under the act will be much larger if history is any guide. In 1989, Roberto Suro, writing in the New York Times, described the 1986 amnesty as "one of the most extensive immigration frauds ever perpetrated against the United States Government", noting that "federal officials and immigration experts place the number of fraudulent applications at somewhere between 250,000 and 650,000." And that was when the nation's total illegal alien population was less than half of today's 11 million. Mass legalizations like Obama's new administrative DREAM Act will undoubtedly benefit thousands of people who are technically ineligible under the administration's memo.

"It's for those with no criminal history." Advocates claim this grant of work permits would benefit illegal aliens who are already here working and are leading "law-abiding lives". Yet illegal aliens who hold jobs have acquired their positions through fraud and are not, by definition, leading law-abiding lives. For example, illegal aliens regularly engage in ID theft, Social Security fraud, and I-9 Form fraud. This is in addition to any immigration violations.

The White House claims that before an illegal alien can benefit from its administrative amnesty plan, he or she must pass a background check. There are two problems. First, just because a person does not have a rap sheet, it does not necessarily follow that he or she is not violating a number of laws. Most illegal aliens have not been prosecuted for their ID theft, for example, because the White House has made a decision to not go after these so-called "low priority" offenders. The result is that a background check may turn up nothing, even though the alien could easily be prosecuted if the Obama administration was interested in upholding the rule of law.

Second, an alien's background is potentially unknowable. A background check will likely be a simple name search in U.S. databases. One problem is that the alien has likely been using a number of aliases during his or her stay in the United States, making a background check difficult. Furthermore, a background check is unlikely to include a search of foreign databases, yet the alien may be a serious criminal in his or her home country. Amnesties are notorious for granting legal status to problematic individuals — such as the 1993 WTC bombers — and there is no reason to believe this plan would be any different.

"It's for children." The plan would benefit illegal aliens up to age 30, and anyone 18 or older is an adult. This is not just for youths. Furthermore, this plan will benefit any older illegal alien who can successfully make a fraudulent claim as to his or her age. Illegal aliens are already involved in serious ID fraud and ID theft, so falsifying one's age to the Obama administration shouldn't be too much of a problem. As history shows, amnesties are full of fraud. It is very likely that this amnesty will benefit many people who do not fit into the categories set forth in the administrative memo.

"It's only for those brought here by their parents." Obama's proposal would benefit illegal aliens who snuck into the United States on their own. Like the failed DREAM Act, this plan does not include any language requiring that illegal alien beneficiaries actually be "brought" into the United States by their parents. This is a fictitious description that amnesty advocates have created in the hope that it creates sympathy, and ultimately support, for amnesty. It is well known that teenage aliens frequently enter the United States illegally on their own volition. Put another way, people who knowingly and willingly violated U.S. sovereignty will benefit from Obama's plan. The only reason that "children brought into the United States" are sympathetic is because they did not make the decision to violate U.S. sovereignty. The same cannot be said for many of the potential beneficiaries under this plan.

Even Janet Napolitano's memo contains an inconsistency. She writes that it is for "certain young people who were brought to this country" yet in the nuts-and-bolts section of the memo, she explains that the plan would apply to all illegal aliens who "came to the United States under the age of 16". Legally and morally culpable illegal aliens will benefit under the plan.

"They must have lived in United States for five continuous years." It is well established in immigration law that the "continuous residence" requirement does not actually require an alien to be continuously resident in the United States. Immigration attorneys have been successful in getting immigration courts to whittle this down to a point where it is almost meaningless. For example, an alien seeking naturalization must also prove five years of continuous residency, but that can still be met even if the alien has been absent from the United States for up to six months. And the alien can have multiple six-month vacations over the course of five years. If Obama's administrative DREAM Act follows established precedent, the five-year residency requirement will not mean much.

"It will not lead to citizenship." The entire goal of President Obama's administrative DREAM Act is to put illegal aliens on a pathway to citizenship. The White House knows it cannot get an amnesty through Congress, so its new goal is to provide illegal aliens as many benefits of U.S. citizenship as possible today, so that full citizenship simply becomes a matter of filling out paperwork tomorrow. This plan will result in work permits being granted to illegal aliens. Does anyone really think that once the illegal aliens are granted work permits, the administration won't decree that these illegal aliens also have a right to driver's licenses so that they can get to work? And why shouldn't they be allowed to vote? This is all part of an ongoing agenda to legitimize a population of people who have chosen to violate multiple U.S. laws. It starts small, like recognizing unverifiable foreign consulate cards such as Mexico's matricula consular so that the alien can open a bank account, get a loan, open credit cards, and so forth. Eventually, the illegal alien acquires all of the benefits of U.S. citizenship with few civic responsibilities.

It is important to deport illegal aliens at the first possible opportunity.

Eight Amendments to Increase Immigration Enforcement Approved by the House

Last night, the House of Representatives passed the Homeland Security spending bill for the 2013 fiscal year, which included 8 immigration amendments supported by NumbersUSA.

Throughout the day on Thursday, our activists flooded the Capitol switchboard with calls to help get the amendments passed. And with roll call votes on three of the amendments, we'll be able to update our grade cards over the next few days!

The first amendment to receive a roll call actually came on Wednesday night and was featured on our home page on Thursday. Reps. Ted Poe of Texas and Jason Altmire of Pennsylvania offered a bipartisan amendment to reallocate funds to pay for the construction of cell phone towers along the Southwest border. The wife of murdered rancher Robert Krentz believes that if there was a cell phone signal along the border in 2011, her husband might still be alive today. The amendment passed 302-to-113 with strong support coming from both sides of the aisle.

The two other roll call votes were split mostly by party line, but both were still approved with large margins. Rep. Steve King of Iowa offered an amendment that would prohibit funds from being used to implement and execute the directives from ICE Director John Morton's memos of 2011. These memos instruct agents to use prosecutorial discretion thereby offering an administrative amnesty to illegal aliens that have not committed a violent crime. It passed 238-to-175. The other amendment was offered by Rep. John Sullivan of Oklahoma, and his amendment prohibited funds from being used to terminate 287(g) contracts. It passed 250-to-164.

The amendments approved by voice vote include:

  • Rep. Chip Cravaack's amendment to keep criminal aliens behind bars before they're deported;
  • Rep. Price's amendment to prevent funds from being used to circumvent the enforcement of immigration laws;
  • Rep. Black's amendment to prohibit the funding of a Public Advocate position within ICE;
  • Rep. Graves' amendment to prevent the implementation

Visit the Numbers USA website for more information

 


 

Deportation consistent with immigration rules: US

The US today said that the deportation of Indian orphan Kairi Abha Shepherd was consistent with its immigration priorities, indicating it would go ahead with the proceedings, despite an appeal by New Delhi that her case be treated with "sensitivity and compassion".

India had said that the humanitarian dimension of the case should be considered before removing Shepherd, who was adopted by an Utah woman from Kolkata when she was just three months old and has lived in the US ever since.

In 2004, Shepherd, was convicted of attempted forgery and third-degree forgery. After she served her time, the government initiated removal proceedings against her, and the 30 year old is facing deportation as a "criminal alien".

Reacting to the Indian request, the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said the deportation proceedings were in line with immigration enforcement priorities.

"ICE has reviewed Ms Shepherd's case at length and believes seeking her removal is consistent with the agency's immigration enforcement priorities, which include focusing on identification and deportation of aliens with felony criminal convictions," spokesperson Virginia Kice said.

The statement came in response to the Indian Embassy spokesman, Virander Paul's plea in this regard that her case "deserves to be treated with the utmost sensitivity and compassion, keeping in mind the humanitarian dimension and tenets of universally accepted human rights".

"The Embassy has seen reports concerning Kairi Shepherd, and has requested the US authorities for facts on this matter," the spokesman said. "All the information available to us on this case indicates that it has a clearly humanitarian dimension that cannot be ignored. As reports indicate, Kairi Shepherd was brought to the United States after adoption, as a baby, and has known no other home," Paul said.

Explaining the case of Shepherd, the ICE spokesperson said she was originally encountered by Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers at the Salt Lake County Adult Detention Complex in October 2007 following her incarceration on unknown local charges.

"ERO officers processed Ms Shepherd and placed her in immigration removal proceedings after determining she was potentially deportable based upon her criminal history," Kice said.

She said an immigration judge had ordered Shepherd's deportation in February 2010, and a Court of Appeals had recently declined to set aside that order.

"Background checks indicate Ms Shepherd's criminal history includes two prior convictions in Utah in 2004 for attempted forgery and forgery, the latter of which constitutes an aggravated felony," Kice said, defending ICE's decision to move ahead with the deportation proceedings.

Shepherd has said deportation was akin to 'death sentence' for her.

Shepherd was adopted by an Utah woman in 1982. As luck would have it, her mother died of cancer when she was eight. "Ms Shepherd was an orphaned baby in India when she was brought to this country for adoption in 1982 by a US citizen. Her adoptive mother died when she was eight years of age, and she was thereafter cared for by guardians. There is no record of any effort by Ms Shepherd or her guardians to petition for her citizenship," court documents say.

At an initial hearing before the Immigration Judge (IJ), government counsel noted that Shepherd's history suggested she might be able to prove she became a US citizen through adoption under the CCA's automatic citizenship provision.

This provision directs that "a child born outside of the United States automatically becomes a citizen of the United States" when three conditions are fulfilled: "(1) At least one parent of the child is a citizen of the United States"; "(2) The child is under the age of eighteen years"; and "(3) The child is residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the citizen parent pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent residence".

And citizenship constitutes the "'denial of an essential jurisdictional fact' in a deportation proceeding".

Her deportation proceedings would be carried out by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) after it receives the necessary travel documents from the Indian Government.

"Before carrying out a deportation, ICE (US Immigration and Customs Enforcement) must first obtain a travel document to ensure the receiving country will admit the alien who is being returned," ICE spokesperson, Lori K Haley.

 

Governor Kitzhabers actions generate letter of frustration

Stephen Smith of Portland was moved to "words" in a great letter to his Legislator.  Read his letter in our letters section.

Perhaps you'll be inspired to write a letter of your own, too!  If you don't know how to contact your Legislator click here.

Governor Kitzhaber attempts to preempt federal law

Read below a statement from the Department of Homeland Security outlining the documents a foreign national must have to enter the United States legally. In essence a non-citizen must have either a passport or a valid visa issued by a U.S. Consular official. There is one exception to the rule.

A visa and passport are not required of a Mexican national who is in possession of a Form DSP-150, B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card, containing a machine-readable biometric identifier issued by the U.S.Department of State. Mexican citizens using the card may only travel 25 miles into the U.S.

A Mexican matricula consular card is not valid as proof that a person is legally in the U.S. In fact, if a Mexican matricula card is the best or only identification a person can present, that is tacit admission that the person is illegally in the U.S.

Governor Kitzhaber is attempting to preempt federal law by promoting acceptance of the matricula consular as identification for drivers. That policy amounts to aiding and abetting illegal immigration. Furthermore it puts the Oregon State Police in a difficult legal position and citizens in danger.

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U.S. Customs & Border Protection

Entering the U.S. - Documents required for Foreign Nationals (International Travelers)

What travel documents and identification are required for a foreign national to enter the U.S.?

Updated 02/06/2012 11:22 AM

 

A foreign national or alien entering the U.S. is generally required to present a passport and valid visa issued by a U.S. Consular Official, unless they are a citizen of a country eligible for the Visa Waiver Program, or are a lawful permanent resident of the U.S. or a citizen of Canada. The Visa Waiver Program allows foreign nationals from certain countries to be admitted to the U.S. under limited conditions and for a limited time without obtaining a visa. The foreign national must arrive on an approved carrier (if coming by air or sea), staying no more than 90 days, for pleasure/medical purposes/business, and be able to prove they are not inadmissible. The foreign national is still required to have a passport. To obtain a list of countries eligible for the VisaWaiver Program, please reference the Department of State Web site. Canadians coming as a Treaty Trader, classification E are required to have a visa to enter the U.S. as are Canadians coming to marry a U.S. citizen and reside in the U.S. (K1)

A visa and passport are not required of a Mexican national who is in possession of a Form DSP-150, B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card, containing a machine-readable biometric identifier, issued by the Department of State and is applying for admission as a temporary visitor for business or pleasure from contiguous territory by land or sea. Mexican citizens using the Border Crossing Card may only travel 25 miles into the U.S. - except in the Nogales/Tucson area, where travel to Tucson is authorized.

Continuing students who are going to travel outside of the United States must see their foreign student advisor and obtain an endorsement from the DSO or RO. The endorsement will be made on page 3 of the SEVIS Form I-20 or page 1 of the DS-2019. When returning to the United States, a continuing student/exchange visitor must present a valid SEVIS Form I-20 or DS-2019 with the DSO or RO signature showing that the student is active and in good standing with the school or program.

Visitors traveling to the U.S. are required to be in possession of passports that are valid for six months beyond the period of their intended stay in the U.S. For a list of countries exempt from the six month rule, see Six Month Club. (Six Month Club validity on your passport does not apply to U.S. Citizens returning to the United States.)

Senator Merkely holding 5 town halls in Eastern Oregon

OFIRP encourages members to attend Townhall meetings and ask questions. See below for suggested questions, if you don't have your own ideas.  Invite a friend or neighbor to join you.  Remember, Senator Merkley works for Oregon's citizens, but his Immigration-Reduction Report Card shows a D- grade.   

Ask Senator Merkley to explain why he isn't working for unemployed Oregonians.

Sherman County Town Hall
Tuesday, May 29, 2012
12:00 pm
Rufus Community Center
304 West 2nd
Rufus, OR 97050

Gilliam County Town Hall
Tuesday, May 29, 2012
2:30 pm
Arlington High School Gymnasium
1200 Main Street
Arlington, 97812

Morrow County Town Hall
Tuesday, May 29, 2012
5:30 pm
Ione School District
Cafeteria
445 Spring Street
Ione, OR 97843

Wallowa County Town Hall
Wednesday, May 30, 2012
2:00 pm
South Fork Grange
Hwy 82 (Center of Lostine)
Lostine, OR 97857

Wheeler County Town Hall
Thursday, May 31, 2012
12:00 pm
Wheeler County Family Services Building
401 Fourth Street
Fossil, OR 97830

Below are a few examples of questions you could ask Senator Merkley:

Senator Merkley, mandatory E-Verify could get millions of Americans back to work and has support from people in every party. Why have you not worked with fellow Oregonian Representative DeFazio to get this mandate passed?

Senator Merkley, only illegal aliens and the big businesses that hire them are against E-Verify. 81% of Democrats support E-Verify. So why are you refusing to support this program? Who are you trying to protect?

Senator Merkley, there are 20 million Americans who are unemployed, jobless, or underemployed. If you were on the side of the American worker, you would support E-Verify. It could open up 7 million jobs, more than any bill being discussed in Congress right now! Will you please support mandatory E-Verify?

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