E-Verify

Your tax dollars at work

Oregon is home to a thriving nursery industry.  However, many of these businesses take advantage of Brad Avakian (Bureau of Labor and Industries Commissioner) and Oregon's lax enforcement of labor laws.  They often rely on workers that are in the U.S illegally.  Now, to add insult to injury, your tax dollars are being used to educate nursery workers, so they will be better educated for their employers. Read more here.

Wouldn't Oregon's tax dollars be better spent to educate Oregon's unemployed youth, our returning veterans or our low skill workers that want to work, but either don't have specialized skills or simply can't find a job?

Oregon needs a strong Bureau of Labor and Industries Commissioner.  Vote for Bruce Starr for BOLI Commissioner.
 

Romney in 2nd debate refuses to budge or pander on issue of taking jobs from illegal aliens

Gov. Romney sent a powerful positive message to unemployed American workers in construction, service and manufacturing by refusing to budge from his long-term insistence on strong enforcement to get illegal immigrants out of U.S. jobs.

He did so in the face of a tough audience question about "productive" illegal immigrants and in response to attacks by Pres. Obama about Romney's support for "self-deportation."

Romney noted two primary ways that a country can enforce its immigration rules and said he rejects the one that involves mass roundups and mass deportations. Instead, he said, he would take away the jobs and benefits magnets and allow most illegal immigrants to come to their own conclusion on moving back to their home countries.

Obama, unfortunately, indicated that he opposes both enforcement options, except for deporting criminals who are "hurting the community."
 

OFIR VP published in Washington Times

Rick LaMountain is a talented writer often published in The Oregonian.  LaMountain has a gift for making a clear point and did just that, in a well sourced commentary about unions and their involvement in illegal immigration issues.

Friday, September 7, 5th Congressional District Debate

Alert date: 
2012-09-05
Alert body: 

-Election 2012-

5th Congressional District Debate:   Lugo, Schrader and Thompson

Salem City Club is pleased to host a debate between the three candidates seeking to represent Oregon's 5th congressional district in U.S. House of Representatives. Join us on Friday, September 7 at noon when we open our 45th season with this dynamic program. Congressional District 5 encompasses Tillamook, Lincoln, Polk, Marion, and Clackamas counties, rural, metro, coastal, and suburban neighborhoods.

For more information please visit the Salem City club website.

NOTE:  Incumbent Kurt Schrader has a D grade on immigration issues according to NumbersUSA.  Oregon deserves better!

This evening is your opportunity to make a difference - attend Keizer City Council Work Session, Monday, September 10th

Alert date: 
2012-09-07
Alert body: 

Salem and Keizer members, friends and supporters,

Sometimes it feels like the issue of illegal immigration is too big and there is nothing one person can do.  But, here is a great opportunity right in our own backyard!

On Monday, September 10th, the Keizer City Council will have a Work Session at 5:45 p.m (OFIR suggests arriving earlier, if possible). The topic for the work session will be the City Council Rule that requires youth councilors to be electors when they turn 18 years of age. In essence the rules require that youth councilors must be U.S. citizens.

The city council has come under pressure from outside groups to allow “undocumented aliens” to become youth councilors. Of course people who are not in the US legally cannot become electors. The purpose of the program is that the city council wanted young adults to gain experience and hopefully someday they would then decide to get involved in their local government. OFIR believes the program should be open only to American citizens and not those in our country illegally.  Please plan to attend and bring a friend or neighbor.  It is OFIR's understanding that pro-illegal immigration groups plan to "occupy" this event.  If so, please to NOT engage in any combative language or yelling.  Be polite and respectful if called on to comment.  We want everyone to be safe!

What: The work session will be held in the Keizer Council Chambers.

When: 5:45 Monday, September 10. (go earlier if possible)

Where: Keizer City hall, 930 Chemawa Road NE, Keizer, OR 97303.

OFIR encourages you to attend the work session and let the city council know that

you support their rule requiring only people legally in the country be allowed in the program.

The work session will start at 5:45 p.m. (get there earlier, if possible)

If you have any questions please call the OFIR office at (503) 435-0141.

On deporting illegal aliens - Thoughts of a retired Border Patrol agent

One of the original intentions of immigration law, and the effort to locate and remove those illegally in our country, was the concern for displacement of American employees. It was considered somewhat the acid test. If American employees were being set aside, the offending illegals were arrested and deported. At some juncture in the recent past, that concept was apparently pitched out the window. The big conundrum is not so much that it happened, but rather why did it happen. It's the product of a frightening political shift that is totally incomprehensible to anyone other than those who seek reelection. It's also bi-partisan. It has to stop, and we have to return to rational thinking.

Depending on whose estimates one uses, we have nearly as many illegals employed as we do legal residents and citizens out of work. Certainly more than 50 percent. That quite simply has to stop.

That we cannot deport such huge numbers, and therefore must create a method through which illegals can remain, is pure political bunk. How do we deport them? In earnest. We start with number one, and we work our way up the ladder. We streamline the processing, and remove administrative road-blocks. When I was first in the Border Patrol, we were led to believe that there was a time when processing an illegal was nothing more than a 3x5 hand written card; probably during Operation Wet Back. Today, the same thing can be done, but on a computerized system. Prints can be digitally checked, and repeat offenders can get their due. Yes, it can be done, and it must be done. All, however, is contingent on a relatively well-sealed border. That's the first order of the day.

Hasta La Vista,

Gary Fossen,

Jacksonville, Oregon


 

Oregon teen unemployment 30%

Oregon teenagers faced a challenging job market this summer.

An analysis by the Employment Policies Institute found that the state's unemployment rate in July was 30.3 percent, the third-highest among the states.

Using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the institute pegged national teen unemployment at 23.8 percent. Between April and July, the number of unemployed citizens between the ages of 16 and 24 rose by 2.1 million, to 19.5 million.

“The nation’s teens have suffered through a fourth summer of difficult job prospects,” said Michael Saltsman, research fellow at EPI. “As a result, thousands are going back to school having missed out on the valuable career experience that comes from an entry-level job.”

The EPI analysis found that 19 states had teen unemployment rates of more than 25 percent from August 2011 through July 2012. Here is the breakdown:

1. California 35.4%
2. South Carolina 30.5%
3. Oregon 30.3%
4. Georgia 30.2%
5. Hawaii 29.6%
6. Arizona 28.7%
7. Washington 28.7%
8. Louisiana 27.5%
9. North Carolina 27.5%
10. Rhode Island 27.4%
11. Colorado 27.3%
12. New York 27.1%
13. Mississippi 26.9%
14. Illinois 26.5%
15. Nevada 26.3%
16. Florida 25.7%
17. New Jersey 25.6%
18. Idaho 25.1%
19. Kentucky 25.0%
 

Republicans decry 'deadly' policy as report shows illegal immigrants committing new crimes

Roughly one in six illegal immigrants is re-arrested on criminal charges within three years of release, according to new government data being released Tuesday.

Those charges range from murder to drunken-driving and, according to House Republicans pushing out the report, are symptoms of what they describe as a "dangerous and deadly" immigration policy.

The findings, obtained by Fox News, are contained in reports by the Republican-controlled House Judiciary Committee and nonpartisan Congressional Research Service. They are the result of the committee’s subpoena request for Department of Homeland Security records from October 2008 to July 2011.

The information was analyzed by the CRS, which also broke down the information for criminal immigrants -- legal immigrants who committed crimes and were arrested again over the three-year period. Together, the two groups also had a roughly one-in-six recidivism rate.

The records show 276,412 reported charges against illegal and criminal immigrants over that three-year period as identified by Secure Communities, a federal program that essentially attempts to make best use of resources by identifying and prioritizing which illegal immigrants pose the biggest threat to public safety and should be arrested or deported.

Of the 160,000 people in the database, more than 26,000 were re-arrested -- accounting for nearly 58,000 crimes and violations.

They allegedly committed nearly 8,500 drunken-driving offenses and more than 6,000 drug-related violations. The records also show major criminal offenses, which included murder, battery, rape, kidnapping and nearly 3,000 thefts. Roughly 2 percent of the crimes included carjacking, child molestation, lynching and torture, according to the 13-page Congressional Research Service report.

“The Obama administration could have prevented these senseless crimes by enforcing our immigration laws,” the committee chairman, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, said. “But President Obama continues to further his anti-enforcement agenda while innocent Americans suffer the consequences.”

The report showed that more than 7,000 of those re-arrested were illegal immigrants. Among their charges were 19 murders, three attempted murders and 142 sex crimes.

The records were subpoenaed last year in large part over concerns that Obama administration changes to Secure Communities was allowing “potentially millions of illegal and criminal immigrants to avoid current immigration law,” according to the GOP-led House committee.

The Department of Homeland Security could not be reached for comment.

Committee members cited one case in which an illegal immigrant was flagged by Secure Communities for a June 2010 vehicle theft and then arrested five months later for attempted grand theft.

He was then arrested roughly six months later in connection with murder. He and two other men allegedly attempted to rob a 68-year-old man. When the victim’s grandson intervened, the illegal immigrant allegedly shot and killed the grandson, according to the committee.

“While this illegal immigrant should have been detained and deported, he was not considered a priority under the Obama administration’s reckless immigration policy and was released onto our streets,” the committee concluded.

 

The need for E-Verify

In the OFIR crime section there is a news report of an alleged illegal alien that was recently arrested for 2nd degree theft of a cell phone.

The story that isn't written is that the illegal alien was discovered among a group of construction workers who denied knowing anything until the phone, which was hidden in the insulation, rang. 

Maybe the report should have included that Pedro Salome Ramos-Figueroa also likely stole a job from an American citizen?
 

More than 7 in 10 U.S. teens will be jobless this summer

WASHINGTON — Once a rite of passage to adulthood, summer jobs for teens are disappearing.

Fewer than three in 10 American teenagers now hold jobs such as running cash registers, mowing lawns or busing restaurant tables from June to August. The decline has been particularly sharp since 2000, with employment for 16-to-19-year olds falling to the lowest level since World War II.

And teen employment may never return to pre-recession levels, suggests a projection by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The drop in teen employment, steeper than for other age groups, is partly a cultural shift. More youths are spending summer months in school, at music or learning camps or in other activities geared for college. But the decline is especially troubling for teens for whom college may be out of reach, leaving them increasingly idle and with few options to earn wages and job experience.

Older workers, immigrants and debt-laden college graduates are taking away lower-skill work as they struggle to find their own jobs in the weak economy. Upper-income white teens are three times as likely to have summer jobs as poor black teens, sometimes capitalizing on their parents’ social networks for help.

Overall, more than 44 percent of teens who want summer jobs don’t get them or work fewer hours than they prefer.

“It’s really frustrating,” said Colleen Knaggs, describing her fruitless efforts to find work for the past two years. The 18-year-old graduated from high school last week in Flagstaff, Ariz., the state that ranks highest in the share of U.S. teens who are unable to get the summer work they desire, at 58 percent.

Wanting to be better prepared to live on her own and to save for college, Knaggs says she submitted a dozen applications for summer cashier positions. She was turned down for what she believes was her lack of connections and work experience. Instead of working this summer, she’ll now be babysitting her 10-year-old brother, which has been the extent of her work so far, aside from volunteering at concession stands.

“I feel like sometimes they don’t want to go through the training,” said Knaggs, who is now bracing for a heavier debt load when she attends college in the fall.

Economists say teens who aren’t getting jobs are often those who could use them the most. Many are not moving on to more education.

“I have big concerns about this generation of young people,” said Harry Holzer, labor economist and public policy professor at Georgetown University. He said the income gap between rich and poor is exacerbated when lower-income youths who are less likely to enroll in college are unable to get skills and training.

“For young high school graduates or dropouts, their early work experience is more closely tied to their success in the labor market,” he said.

Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University, said better job pathways are needed for teens who don’t attend four-year colleges, including paid internships for high school seniors and increased post-secondary training in technical institutes.

“We are truly in a labor market depression for teens,” he said. “More than others, teens are frequently off the radar screens of the nation’s and states’ economic policymakers.”

Washington, D.C., was the jurisdiction most likely to have teens wanting summer work but unable to get it or working fewer hours than desired, with more than three in five in that situation. It was followed by Arizona, California, Washington state, Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina and Nevada.

On the other end of the scale, Wyoming, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Nebraska, South Dakota and Kansas had teens who were more often able to find work. All those states have fewer immigrant workers.

The figures are based on an analysis of Census Bureau Current Population Survey data from June to August 2011 by Northeastern’s Center for Labor Market Studies. They are supplemented with research from Christopher Smith and Daniel Aaronson, two Federal Reserve economists, as well as interviews with Labor Department economists and Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a national job placement firm.

About 5.1 million, or just 29.6 percent, of 16-to-19 year olds were employed last summer. Adjusted for seasonal factors, the rate dips to 25.7 percent. In 1978, the share reached a peak of nearly 60 percent before waves of immigration brought in new low-skill workers. Teen employment remained generally above 50 percent until 2001, dropping sharply to fresh lows after each of the past two recessions.

Out of more than 3.5 million underutilized teens who languished in the job market last summer, 1.7 million were unemployed, nearly 700,000 worked fewer hours than desired and 1.1 million wanted jobs but had given up looking. That 3.5 million represented a teen underutilization rate of 44 percent, up from roughly 25 percent in 2000.

By race and income, blacks, Hispanics and teens in lower-income families were least likely to be employed in summer jobs. The figure was 14 percent for African-American teens when their family income was less than $40,000 a year, compared to 44 percent of white teens with family income of $100,000-$150,000.
 

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