drugs

Morrow County sheriff visits the U.S., Mexico border

With 40 years of law enforcement experience, Morrow County Sheriff Kenneth Matlack has a vested interest in making sure that those who cross the southern border are here to better their lives without breaking the law.

“There are many people who cross over the border and are hardworking people who are trying to make a better life for themselves,” Matlack said. “But there are a lot of criminals who come over here and are still being criminals, and when they’re deported, they’re just coming back over and keep committing crimes.”

Matlack said he has noticed a trend of the same illegal immigrant criminals coming back to the states just a few months after being deported, and he wanted to see for himself how the border could be letting so many people in. So he and five other sheriffs visited the Rio Grande Valley and the Texas State Police Border Patrol.

“(Officers) are doing the absolute best they can with what’s available, but patrols are overwhelmed,” Matlack said.

Matlack was impressed with their security, but border patrol and Texas State Police are too thinned out to properly cover the border, he said. And if an illegal immigrant is caught, they have to put them through a detention center that is also stretched too thin.

At the detention center Matlack visited, the McAllen Border Station would process about 250 immigrants in a day while he was there.

“In the facilities they break them apart into different groups, but they keep the families together,” Matlack said. “It’s similar to a county jail. There’s open spaces, cafeteria and an exercise area, but it’s not really designed to hold that many people.”

Matlack’s trip to the south was funded by the Federation for American Immigration Reform. FAIR is a non-profit organization that seeks to eliminate illegal immigration and increase border security.

“This is the first time we’ve done something like this,” FAIR Press Secretary Anna Giaritelli said. “But it’s something we’ve wanted to do so that people can see for themselves what’s happening.”

When Matlack would sit in on briefings during his visit, he said the primary topic was seeking out and infiltrating the Mexican drug cartels.

“What happens at the border doesn’t stay at the border,” Matlack said. “The drugs that are crossing through there are spreading throughout the states. It’s a fight every day for the patrols to try and track down these cartels.”

Once a person is processed, within 48 hours they’re taken to Health and Human Services shelters and they’ll have their deportation trial. Among those 250 are a mix of people seeking a fresh start or family member already in the U.S., but also criminals and people involved with cartels. The process of finding out who’s who among the crowd is an exhaustive and imprecise process.

“It’s frustrating to see all the drug activity that’s coming from the border because it’s not secure,” Matlack said. “I’m not looking to over-simplify things, but something needs to be done to secure things, and it has to be a permanent fix, not a quick one.”

Linn County detectives find large marijuana grow

At 10 a.m. on Aug. 12, 2014 Linn County Detectives arrested Louis Alfonso Arellano-Arellano, 47, of Yakima, Wash., while he was tending to a large scale marijuana grow operation, according to a news release from Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley.

The grow operation was located on private timber land owned by Weyerhaeuser Company Inc. in the Lacomb area.

Detectives determined Arellano-Arellano was living in and tending to the marijuana grow site. This large marijuana growing operation caused damage to the surrounding land and to the local streams by the cutting of small trees and brush, depositing trash, and littering the area with chemicals and irrigation tubing.

Detectives seized 1,874 marijuana plants from three different growing plots. The grow site contained a hybrid marijuana strain. This type of marijuana plant produces a much smaller and thinner plant by maturing at a faster rate, making the growing season much shorter. The estimated value of the marijuana plants if allowed to reach maturity is approximately $1.8 million.

Arellano-Arellano was lodged in the Linn County Jail and was charged with Unlawful Manufacture of Marijuana, Unlawful Possession of Marijuana, Criminal Mischief II, Criminal Trespass II, and Littering in or near waterways.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement determined Arellano-Arellano is in the United States illegally and therefore has placed a hold on him.

 

Transport of nearly $1 million worth of meth lands Canby man 17+ years in prison

Omar Martinez Rodriguez showed such little sophistication in drug trafficking that he stuffed 22 pounds of methamphetamine worth close to $1 million into two coolers for the road trip from California to Oregon, his lawyers said.

...Martinez Rodriguez was just a bit player – a courier, not a kingpin.

...sentencing him to more than 17 years in prison. The federal judge said he believed Martinez Rodriguez was planning to sell the meth – some 40,000 doses worth, according to prosecutors.

"You didn't have a chance to capitalize on it, and that's the only thing that saved you from being even more involved as a distributor," Jones said in U.S. District Court in Portland. He noted Martinez Rodriguez' previous assault convictions as well as the undocumented immigrant's illegal re-entry to the United States just months before his September 2013 arrest. "It sounds like you didn't learn anything from going to prison," he said.

Martinez Rodriguez must also serve five years of supervised release, and if he is deported must first get approval from governmental agencies before he may return to the United States.

Martinez Rodriguez was targeted in an investigation, and an informant made arrangements to buy meth from him, according to the government's sentencing memorandum. Authorities learned that his phone was in California, and they began following him after he entered Oregon.

Police conducted a traffic stop around Salem and found the drugs in the coolers ...

 

Bring your American flag - bring your patriotism and join the protest

Alert date: 
July 19, 2014
Alert body: 

Join us Saturday 11am - 4pm on the Center St. bridge overpass in Salem to protest the lack of enforcement of our immigration laws.

Bring something to drink, wear sunscreen and a hat!  Signs will be available if you need one.

Be respectful AT ALL TIMES!  Obey all laws and do not interfere with traffic.

More information.
 

Drug dog find 50 pounds of cocaine in vehicle following traffic stop

A Canadian man has been arrested on suspicion of transporting cocaine.

Charles Taesung Pak, 28 of Vancouver, B.C., was pulled over... driving a rental car and did not answer basic questions.

...they called in Nikko, a drug dog..., finding 50 pounds of cocaine.

The drugs have a street value in the United States of $420,000...

 

Drug cartel operatives wait with baited breath

David Cross has explained why citizens, not only in the Portland Metropolitan area, but all across the state, should be very concerned about issuing driver cards to illegal aliens and, in the end, the terrible price citizens will pay.  Should our elected officials be working so hard to make it even easier for drug cartels and their operatives to get an even stronger foothold in our state? 

Why would they do that?  Because big business and big money have been influencing lawmakers to issue driver cards with no proof of legal presence, so the illegal workforce on which they rely, won't be caught up in pesky immigration issues if stopped for a traffic violation.

Meanwhile - Oregonians are at even greater risk as illegal drugs are delivered statewide, horrific crimes are committed and lives are lost - just so illegal aliens can get to their illegal jobs -  hired by unscrupulous employers to work at restaurants, hotels, in construction, landscaping, drywall, concrete and more.

To put a finer point on it - the majority of Oregon Legislators would prefer to bow down to big business than to uphold their oath of office and the laws of the land.  In other words - you, your family and your safety are just not as important.  You will simply be 'collateral damage' caused by loosening restrictions on Oregon driver cards.

Your NO vote in NOvember can put an end to this foolish and dangerous law.  Please vote - and tell your friends and family to vote NO in NOvember!

If you are fed up and would like to help with our statewide campaign to overturn SB 833 - please visit our Protect Oregon Driver Licenses website and sign up.  There are a million things we need to accomplish in the next 4 1/2 months and the more people we have helping - the better it will be.

If you just don't have time to volunteer - we would be happy to have your financial support for our winning statewide campaign.  We were very fortunate to have a donor offer Protect Oregon Driver Licenses a $5,000 matching grant.  Your $5, $20 or even $100 donation will be matched dollar for dollar!  Please consider a generous donation to help with the campaign.

 

 

 

 

Cartel-affiliated groups likely to expand heroin, meth trafficking in Oregon, report concludes

Drug trafficking organizations based in Mexico will continue to dominate Oregon's drug underworld, pumping increasing quantities of heroin into the state, according to a new state report.

"Heroin use and trafficking has increased in Oregon...

The assessment was produced by Oregon HIDTA,...

The trends reported in drug use and trafficking aren't good news for Oregon.

The state ranks fourth in the country in the percentage of residents using illegal drugs...

The report warned that "the number of young users will likely grow...

Mexican national drug trafficking organizations, typically associated with or operating as cartels, control the distribution of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and Mexican-grown marijuana, the report said...

Cartels are playing a dangerous role in Oregon, the report said.

"A growing concern is apparent cartel involvement in homicides and violent crimes...

Link: Oregonian series

"Heroin availability and use in the state has reached a critical level," the report said....

Crystal meth is "highly available" as Mexican traffickers smuggle the drug into the U.S...

"Methamphetamine-related crimes such as identity theft, property and violent crimes will continue to follow the trend of abuse," the report said.

 

Six year report: Criminal aliens incarcerated in the Oregon Dept. of Corrections

According to the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) Inmate Population Profile dated May 1, 2014 DOC indicated there were 14,657 prisoners incarcerated in DOC’s 14 prisons (See attachment).

Not included in DOC’s May 1st Inmate Population Profile was DOC data indicating there were 1,133 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in its prison system (See attachment).

All 1,133 criminal aliens incarcerated on May 1st by DOC had United States (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), detainers. The U.S. DHS–ICE is responsible for indentifying whether a DOC inmate is a criminal alien or a domestic inmate. If an inmate is identified as being a criminal alien, at U.S. DHS–ICE’s request, the DOC places an “ICE detainer” on the inmate that directs DOC officials to transfer custody to ICE following completion of the inmate’s state sanction.

Criminal aliens made up approximately 7.73% of the DOC May 1st prison population (See table).

 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

May 1, 2008

13,614

12,544

1,070

7.86%

May 1, 2009

13,907

12,731

1,176

8.46%

May 1, 2010

13,998

12,764

1,234

8.82%

May 1, 2011

14,038

12,775

1,263

9.00%

May 1, 2012

14,057

12,787

1,270

9.03%

May 1, 2013

14,396

13,201

1,195

8.30%

May 1, 2014

14,657

13,524

1,133

7.73%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 MAY 08rtf – 01 MAY 14.rtf and Inmate Population Profile 01 MAY 08– 01 MAY 14.

Comparing DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers from May 1, 2008 (1,070 criminal aliens) and May 1, 2014 (1,133 criminal aliens), the DOC prison system incarcerated 63 criminal aliens more than it did on May 1, 2008, a 5.89% increase (See table).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers # Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers % Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

May 1, 2008

1,070

————

————

May 1, 2009

1,176

106

9.91%

May 1, 2010

1,234

58

4.93%

May 1, 2011

1,263

29

2.35%

May 1, 2012

1,270

7

0.55%

May 1, 2013

1,195

(75)

(5.90%)

May 1, 2014

1,133

(62)

(5.19%)

Total

63

5.89%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 MAY 08rtf – 01 MAY 14.rtf and Inmate Population Profile 01 MAY 08– 01 MAY 14.

When comparing DOC domestic criminal incarceration numbers from May 1, 2008 (12,544 domestic criminals) and May 1, 2014 (13,524 domestic criminals), the DOC prison system incarcerated 980 domestic criminals more than it did on May 1, 2008, a 7.81% increase (See table).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Domestic Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates # Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

DOC Domestic Inmates % Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

May 1, 2008

12,544

————

————

May 1, 2009

12,731

187

1.49%

May 1, 2010

12,764

33

0.26%

May 1, 2011

12,775

11

0.09%

May 1, 2012

12,787

12

0.09%

May 1, 2013

13,201

414

3.24%

May 1, 2014

13,524

323

2.45%

Total

980

7.81%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 MAY 08rtf – 01 MAY 14.rtf and Inmate Population Profile 01 MAY 08– 01 MAY 14.

Bringing the preceding numbers together, from May 1st 2008 – 2014, six years, the DOC prison population grew by 1,043 domestic and criminal alien prisoners; 6.04% of the overall growth was in criminal alien prisoners.

A review of the 1,133 criminal aliens in DOC prisons by number per county and percentage (%) per county equated to the following: 0-Baker (0.00%); 15-Benton (1.32%); 78-Clackamas (6.88%); 4-Clatsop (0.35%); 1-Columbia (0.09%); 5-Coos (0.44%); 2-Crook (0.18%); 0-Curry (0.00%); 19-Deschutes (1.68%); 5-Douglas (0.44%); 1-Gilliam (0.09%); 0-Grant (0.00%); 0-Harney (0.00%); 5-Hood River (0.44%); 49-Jackson (4.32%); 9-Jefferson (0.79%); 7-Josephine (0.62%); 8-Klamath (0.71%); 0-Lake (0.00); 58-Lane (5.12%); 9-Lincoln (0.79%); 28-Linn (2.47%); 12-Malheur (1.06%); 266-Marion (23.48%); 4-Morrow (0.35%); 275-Multnomah (24.27%); 1-OOS (0.09%); 17-Polk (1.50%); 0-Sherman (0.00%); 4-Tillamook (0.35%); 19-Umatilla (1.68%); 3-Union (0.26); 0-Wallowa (0.00%); 3-Wasco (0.26%); 195-Washington (17.21%); 0-Wheeler (0.00%); and 31-Yamhill (2.74%).

No member of the Oregon State Legislature should forget the uncounted crime victims and their families, no matter what their immigration status, all victims of the 1,133 criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons.

A review of the 1,133 criminal aliens in the DOC prison population by numbers per crime and percentage (%) per crime equated to the following: 2-arsons (0.18%); 105-assaults (9.27%); 24-burglaries (2.12%); 14-driving offenses (1.23%); 175-drugs (15.44%); 0-escape (0.00%); 3-forgeries (0.26%); 146-homicides (12.89%); 47-kidnappings (4.15%); 57-others (5.03%); 176-rapes (15.53%); 67-robberies (5.91%); 207-sex abuses (18.27%); 93-sodomies (8.21%); 12-thefts (1.06%); and 5-vehicle thefts (0.44%).

Oregon State Legislators should not overlook the source of the preceding crimes, the country of origin of the 1,133 criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The self-declared counties of origin of the 1,133 criminal aliens in the DOC prison population by numbers and percentage (%) per country equated to the following: 6-Canada (0.53%); 11-Cuba (0.97%); 15-El Salvador (1.32%); 7-Federated States of Micronesia (0.62%); 32-Guatemala (2.82%); 11-Honduras (0.97%); 6-Laos (0.53%); 918-Mexico (81.02%); 83-others (7.32%); 6-Philippines (0.53%); 9-Russia (0.79%); 12-Ukraine (1.06%); and 17-Vietnam (1.50%).

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner incarcerated in the DOC prison system costs the state approximately ($87.08) per day; the cost to incarcerate a prisoner increased ($2.27) per day in May 2014, a 2.67% increase from 2013’s cost of ($84.81) per day (See link).

http://www.oregon.gov/doc/GECO/docs/pdf/IB_53_quick_facts.pdf

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 1,133 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($98,661.64) per day, ($690,631.48) per week, and ($36,011,498.60) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2013 United States Federal Government State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $2,146,935.00, if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2014, the cost to incarcerate 1,133 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($33,864,563.60) (See link).

https://www.bja.gov/Funding/13SCAAPawards.pdf

None of preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 1,133 criminal aliens include the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), court costs, nor cost estimates to cover victim assistance.

An unfortunate fact, the State of Oregon is not fully cooperating with the U.S. DHS–ICE to fight crime committed by criminal aliens who reside in Oregon.

In year 2007, a United States Department of Justice (USDOJ) report titled “Cooperation of SCAAP (State Criminal Alien Assistance Program) Recipients in the Removal of Criminal Aliens from the United States, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Inspector General Audit Division, Audit Report 07-07, May 2007, Redacted-Public Version” identified the State of Oregon as having an official “state sanctuary statute,” ORS 181.850 Enforcement of federal immigration laws (See link).

http://www.usdoj.gov/oig/reports/OJP/a0707/final.pdf

The USDOJ, the federal governments top law enforcement agency, identified Oregon as a “sanctuary” for criminal aliens.

An Oregon law, Oregon Revised Statue 181.850 (ORS 181.850), Section (1), prohibits Oregon law enforcement (Oregon State Police (OSP), county sheriffs, city police departments) from asking immigration status of anyone residing in the State of Oregon “for the purpose of detecting or apprehending persons whose only violation of law is that they are persons of foreign citizenship present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.” Under ORS 181.850, Section (2), Oregon law enforcement may exchange information with U.S. DHS–ICE . . . “in order to: Subsection (a), “Verify the immigration status of a person if the person is arrested for any criminal offense;” or, Subsection (b), “Request criminal investigation information with reference to persons named in records of the” U.S. DHS–ICE . . . (See link).

http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/lawsstatutes/2013ors181.html

The State of Oregon should no longer be classified by U.S. federal government law enforcement as having an official “state sanctuary statute” for criminal aliens, nor should Oregon be a sanctuary for criminal aliens to kill, rape, maim or abuse Oregonians.

 

Oregon drug deaths: More people dying from meth use, cocaine-related deaths at a low

There was one less drug-related death in Oregon last year, compared to 2012.

What stood out: The fewest number of people died as a result of cocaine use in more than a decade, but the greatest number of people lost their lives as a result of methamphetamine use since 2000...

...123 methamphetamine-related deaths did not result from overdoses of the drug, but the result of other traumatic incidents, such as a drowning or a car crash. Methamphetamine use is also linked to seizures and sudden elevation in blood pressure, which can cause strokes or a heart attack.
...Superlabs in Mexico took over production of methamphetamine after domestic U.S. production was essentially eliminated due to the limits placed on the key ingredient, pseudoephedrine, he said.

"Meth is probably the most plentiful drug in the western United States,'' Kruger said...

Dr. Karen Gunson, state medical examiner, said illicit drug deaths dropped by one in 2013, to 222 deaths from 223 in 2012. Last year, the state recorded the highest number of methamphetamine-related deaths since 2000, Gunson said.Stuart Tomlinson/The Oregonian/2012...

 

Convicted felon deported to Mexico 2 years ago, arrested after shooting BB gun at car

A man arrested Wednesday night for allegedly shooting a BB gun at a car in Oregon City turned out to be an convicted felon who had been deported to Mexico two years ago.

Jiminez-Barragan provided a fake Mexican driver's license. Police searched the truck and said they found a BB gun, $6,600 in cash and about five grams of heroin. Jiminez-Barragan, 28, then gave police a second phony name. After he was fingerprinted, police learned his real identity.

Jiminez-Barragan was deported more than two years ago and had illegally returned about a month ago, police said. He was convicted in Multnomah County on drug charges.

He also is subject to an immigration hold.

 

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