ORS 181A.820

Oregon’s Marion County First in Foreign National Crime in October 2017

On October 2, 2017 Oregon’s Marion County had 233 of the 971 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) prison system; the county was first in foreign national crime in the state with 24.00 percent of the criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The following table reveals how Marion County residents were harmed or victimized by the 233 criminal aliens incarcerated on October 2nd in the DOC prison system with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainers.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

51

21.89%

Rape

50

21.46%

Sodomy

31

13.30%

Homicide

22

9.44%

Assault

18

7.73%

Kidnapping

10

4.29%

Robbery

9

3.86%

Drugs

8

3.43%

Burglary

7

3.00%

Theft

4

1.72%

Driving Offense

1

0.43%

Vehicle Theft

1

0.43%

Arson

0

0.00%

Escape

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

21

9.01%

Total

233

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

This table reveals, using the DOC ICE detainer numbers from October 2nd, the total number of criminal alien inmates incarcerated in the DOC prison system by type of crime from all Oregon counties, the total number of criminal alien inmates from Marion County in DOC prisons by type of crime and the percentage of those alien inmates who were from the county by type of crime.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from all Oregon Counties by Type of Crime

Total number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers in DOC Prisons from Marion County by Type of Crime

Sex Abuse

197

51

25.89%

Rape

174

50

28.74%

Homicide

137

22

16.06%

Drugs

106

8

7.55%

Sodomy

99

31

31.31%

Assault

79

18

22.78%

Robbery

48

9

18.75%

Kidnapping

24

10

41.67%

Burglary

22

7

31.82%

Theft

16

4

25.00%

Driving Offense

8

1

12.50%

Vehicle Theft

4

1

25.00%

Escape

1

0

0.00%

Arson

0

0

0.00%

Forgery

0

0

0.00%

Other / Combination Crimes

56

21

37.50%

Total

971

233

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

The following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the majority of the 233 criminal aliens with ICE immigration detainers who have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County in the DOC prison system.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

Total Inmates W/ ICE Detainers from Marion Country by Country of Origin in DOC Prisons

Percentage of Inmates W/ICE Detainers by Country of Origin from Marion County in DOC Prisons

Mexico

204

87.55%

Federated States of Micronesia

3

1.29%

Russia

3

1.29%

Vietnam

3

1.29%

Cambodia

2

0.86%

El Salvador

2

0.86%

Marshall Islands

2

0.86%

Other Countries

14

6.01%

Total

233

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 02 October 17.

Criminal aliens from 19 different countries have harmed or victimized the residents of Marion County.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials in Marion County to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the county. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/

ICE Arrests Illegal Alien Previously Convicted for Child Molestation

In a press release filed Friday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that they apprehended an individual illegally entering the United States across the southern border who had previously been convicted in the States for sexually assaulting a minor.

Border patrol agents at the Ajo station near Tuscon, Arizona apprehended the pervert sneaking into the country on Thursday. After running a background check, authorities discovered that 29 year-old Raul Cano-Garcia had been convicted in Fresno, California for having sex with a child under the age of 14. Cano-Garcia was sentenced to three years, but it is unclear if he ever actually served any jail time or was simply deported.

President Donald J. Trump received massive criticism for kicking off his 2016 presidential campaign with comments saying Mexico was sending "rapists" when illegal aliens entered the country. Cano-Garcia, however, is one of many illegal aliens from Mexico who have been convicted in American courts for some kind of sexual offense.

Statistics are not available right now for how many illegal aliens in jails across America are sex offenders, but a report out of Oregon last spring showed startling numbers within the state.

According to the Washington Examiner, nearly half of the illegal aliens in Oregon's jails are convicted sex offenders. 83% of those individuals convicted are from Mexico. The Examiner also reported last spring that under President Obama, ICE released nearly 600 sex offenders "for legal reasons." Many of these individuals were sent back to their native countries, but 151 one of them were denied admittance by those nations. Many of these individuals were released back into the streets of America.

Dale Wilcox, executive director of the Immigration Reform Law Institute, told the Examiner these numbers highlight the need for serious immigration reform.

"The anti-borders left routinely inject sanctimony into the immigration issue claiming that anyone with opposing arguments is morally inferior," said Dale Wilcox, executive director of the Immigration Reform Law Institute.

"But when statistics like this come out, statistics which show the horrific consequences of having an unregulated immigration system, they merely step over them like they don't exist," he added.

His group has a solid record of obtaining insider documents that show flaws in the immigration system.

Oregon Department of Corrections: Foreign National Homicide Report August 2017

Information obtained from the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated on August 1, 2017 that 138 of the 984 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) in the state’s prison system were incarcerated for homicidal crimes (various degrees of murder and manslaughter), 14.02 percent of the criminal alien prison population.

Using DOC U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the total number criminal alien inmates along with the number and percentage of those alien inmates incarcerated on August 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE Detainers

DOC Number of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ICE Detainers for Homicidal Crimes

August 1, 2017

984

138

14.02%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the number and percentage of criminal alien inmates incarcerated on August 1st that were sent to prison from the state’s 36 counties for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by County Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

Multnomah

40

28.99%

Marion

22

15.94%

Washington

21

15.22%

Umatilla

11

7.97%

Clackamas

7

5.07%

Jackson

6

4.35%

Lane

5

3.62%

Klamath

3

2.17%

Linn

3

2.17%

Yamhill

3

2.17%

Benton

2

1.45%

Josephine

2

1.45%

Lincoln

2

1.45%

Polk

2

1.45%

Clatsop

1

0.72%

Coos

1

0.72%

Douglas

1

0.72%

Gilliam

1

0.72%

Hood River

1

0.72%

Jefferson

1

0.72%

Malheur

1

0.72%

OOS (Not a County)

1

0.72%

Tillamook

1

0.72%

Baker

0

0.00%

Columbia

0

0.00%

Crook

0

0.00%

Curry

0

0.00%

Deschutes

0

0.00%

Grant

0

0.00%

Harney

0

0.00%

Lake

0

0.00%

Morrow

0

0.00%

Sherman

0

0.00%

Union

0

0.00%

Wallowa

0

0.00%

Wasco

0

0.00%

Wheeler

0

0.00%

Total

138

100.00%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Using DOC ICE immigration detainer numbers, the following table reveals the self-declared countries of origin of the 138 criminal alien inmates by number and percentage incarcerated on August 1st in the state’s prisons for homicidal crimes.
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Country

DOC Number of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

DOC Percent of Inmates W/ ICE Detainers by Country Incarcerated for Homicidal Crimes

 

Mexico

108

78.26%

 

Cuba

4

2.90%

 

Canada

3

2.17%

 

Vietnam

3

2.17%

 

Cambodia

2

1.45%

 

El Salvador

2

1.45%

 

Guatemala

2

1.45%

 

Laos

2

1.45%

 

South Korea

2

1.45%

 

China

1

0.72%

 

Costa Rica

1

0.72%

 

Japan

1

0.72%

 

Mariana Islands

1

0.72%

 

Marshall Islands

1

0.72%

 

Nicaragua

1

0.72%

 

Nigeria

1

0.72%

 

Peru

1

0.72%

 

South Africa

1

0.72%

 

Turkey

1

0.72%

 

Total

138

100.00%

 

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Report ICE inmates list 01 August 17.

Criminal aliens from 18 different countries have committed homicidal violence against residents in the state of Oregon.

David Olen Cross of Salem, Oregon writes on immigration issues and foreign national crime. This report is a service to Oregon state, county and city governmental officials to help them assess the impact of foreign national crime in the state. He can be reached at docfnc@yahoo.com or at http://docfnc.wordpress.com/
 


 

It's not too soon! Take advantage of your Oregon Political Tax Credit

Alert date: 
2017-10-02
Alert body: 

This year, don't forget to take advantage of your Oregon Political Tax Credit!

You have a choice: Give your money to the State of Oregon to work against you OR give your money to OFIR PAC to work FOR you!

Learn more about how to give to the OFIR PAC.


 

ICE arrests 33 in Portland during operation targeting sanctuary cities

Federal immigration agents arrested 33 people in Portland during a four-day operation targeting sanctuary cities across the nation this week, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement officials said in a statement Thursday.

Nearly 500 people were arrested for federal immigration violations during the operation...

Agents focused their attention on cities and regions where local law enforcement don't honor immigration detainers...

The operation targeted people with prior criminal convictions, pending criminal charges and gang ties and those who re-entered the country after they were deported...

ICE acting director Tom Homan said in a statement that agents targeted sanctuary cities because "non-cooperation policies" undermine public safety.

"Sanctuary jurisdictions that do not honor detainers or allow us access to jails and prisons are shielding criminal aliens from immigration enforcement and creating a magnet for illegal immigration," he said. "As a result, ICE is forced to dedicate more resources to conduct at-large arrests in these communities."

Multnomah County's policies against sharing information with immigration authorities were criticized in July after a man who had been deported 12 times allegedly attacked two women....

Here's a breakdown of people arrested in each region:

-Baltimore: 28

- Cook County, Illinois: 30

- Denver: 63

- Los Angeles: 101

- New York: 45

- Philadelphia: 107

- Portland: 33

- Santa Clara County, California: 27

- Washington, D.C.: 14

- Massachusetts: 50

Some of the people arrested will be federally prosecuted for alleged illegal entry and re-entry after removal, ICE officials said. Others will administratively processed for deportation.

Attny.Gen. Jeff Sessions visits Portland, calls for proper cooperation in enforcing immigration law

 
Attorney General Jeff Sessions came to Portland on Tuesday, September 19, to speak to state and local law enforcement about the importance of better cooperation between state and federal authorities in controlling immigration.
 
Here are excerpts from Sessions’ remarks
 
The fundamental duty of this government is to protect the safety and the rights of its citizens. President Trump is a law and order President. …
 
A key concern is that some jurisdictions have undertaken to undo our immigration laws through so-called “sanctuary policies.”
 
Such policies undermine the moral authority of law and undermine the safety of the jurisdictions that adopt them.
 
In Portland and all over Oregon, here’s how it works right now: once the police arrest an illegal alien and charge him with a crime, they fingerprint him and book him into their jail.
 
When federal immigration authorities learn that this criminal alien is in a jurisdiction’s custody, our ICE officers issue a detainer request accompanied by a civil arrest warrant and ask the city to either notify them before they release the criminal or to hold the criminal alien long enough to transfer him to federal custody in a safe setting.
 
But political leaders have directed state and local officers to refuse these requests. Cooperation has been a key element in informed crime fighting for decades.
 
The result is that police are forced to release the criminal alien back into the community without regard to the seriousness of his crimes or the length of his rap sheet. Think about that: Police may be forced to release pedophiles, rapists, murderers, drug dealers, and arsonists back into the communities where they had no right to be in the first place. They should according to law and common sense be processed and deported.
 
These policies hinder the work of federal law enforcement; they’re contrary to the rule of law, and they have serious consequences for the law-abiding residents of Oregon. …
 
These policies do far greater damage than many understand. At its root, they are a rejection of our immigration laws and a declaration of open borders.
 
These lawless policies do more than shield individual criminal illegal aliens – they also shelter lethal gangs like the Latin Kings and MS-13.
 
These predators thrive when crime is not met with consequences. This state of lawlessness allows gangs to smuggle guns, drugs, and even humans across borders and around cities and communities.
 
That makes a sanctuary city a trafficker, smuggler, or gang member’s best friend. …
 
They will say that forcing police officers to release criminal aliens back onto the streets will somehow increase community trust. But that does not make sense to me. Would releasing someone who had been arrested 10 times this year into your community give you more confidence in law enforcement?
 
Would learning that your local district attorney actually charges illegal aliens with less serious crimes to evade federal deportation make you believe they are trying to make your neighborhood safer? Would forcing federal officers to track down criminal aliens on your street instead of safely in the jails make you believe we value your community? …
 
The problem is the policies that tie your hands. Sanctuary policies endanger us all, and especially the federal immigration officers who are forced to pursue criminal aliens outside of jails and prisons.
 
Yet, rather than reconsider their policies, these sanctuary jurisdictions feign outrage when they lose federal funds as a direct result of actions designed to nullify plain federal law. Some, including Portland, have even decided to sue this administration so that they can keep receiving taxpayer-funded grants while continuing to impede federal immigration enforcement.
 
These grants are not an entitlement. We strive to help state and local law enforcement.
 
But we cannot continue giving such federal grants to cities that actively undermine the safety of federal law officers and actively frustrate efforts to reduce crime in their own cities.
 
Our duty is to protect public safety and protect taxpayer dollars and I plan to fulfill that duty. …
 
The American people rightly want a lawful immigration system that keeps us safe and serves the national interest. … 
---------------------------------------
The Oregonian has a detailed report on Sessions’ visit to Portland.
 

Fight Over Oregon's 'Sanctuary Law' Brings Immigration Policy Battle To The NW

At a booth at the recent state fair in Salem, people waited in line at a booth for Oregonians for Immigration Reform to sign the group’s proposed ballot measure to repeal Oregon’s so-called “sanctuary law.”

Cynthia Kendoll, the group’s president, said this new measure is attracting more intense interest than its previous attempts to discourage illegal immigration.

“This is something that people are truly really concerned about,” said Kendoll, “and I have just been amazed here at the state fair that people walk up and say, ‘Just let me sign this. I am so sick of this.’”

Oregon may not seem like it is on the front lines of the battle over immigration policy. But the state appears headed toward a bitter election fight on the issue that could reverberate nationally. 

During his presidential campaign last year, Donald Trump put a harsh spotlight on jurisdictions that didn’t fully cooperate with federal immigration officials. In recent weeks, he’s wavered on some immigration issues — such as moving to cut a deal with Democrats on protecting immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. But his administration continues to attack so-called sanctuary laws.

Andrea Williams, one of the chief opponents of the measure, said the looming ballot fight sets up a choice for voters between going with the Trump administration or sticking with law she says reflects “Oregon values” and has long worked well.

“To me, the issue is very simple,” added Williams, executive director of Causa, a Salem-based immigrant rights group.  “Do we want to spend Oregon resources to do the federal government’s job?”

Oregon 30 years ago adopted a law limiting local and state police involvement with federal enforcement. It was the first statewide law of its kind, but it attracted little attention or controversy. Supporters said the law was needed because some local police officers were detaining Latinos simply based on their appearance.

The term sanctuary came into vogue much later as many cities began resisting large-scale deportations. Critics charged that sanctuary cities were shielding criminals and Trump highlighted the issue in his campaign. 

“We will end the sanctuary cities that have resulted in so many needless deaths,” Trump vowed. At the Republican convention last year, the relatives of people who had been killed by immigrants illegally in the country were prominently featured on stage.

Just a few weeks later, Oregonians for Immigration Reform began laying the groundwork for an initiative to abolish the state law.

Trump’s focus “gave us the backup that this is truly something that people are concerned about,” said Kendoll.

Opponents are gearing up to fight the measure and their feelings are also intense.

“Their ultimate goal is to get rid of immigrants because they want white nationalism in this state,” said state Rep. Diego Hernandez, D-Portland.  He argued that Oregon’s sanctuary law helps encourage cooperation with local police.

Causa is helping assemble a broad coalition to oppose the measure. Williams, the group’s executive director, has signed up a sort of who’s who of the major political backers of the Democratic political leadership of the state: the public employee unions, environmental groups as well as gay and abortion rights advocates.

She says her group got a wake-up call three years ago when Oregon voters rejected a new law providing driver’s licenses for people in the country illegally.

The idea was to give people a form of identification that would allow them to drive legally to work and get auto insurance. But Oregonians for Immigration Reform, charging that it only enabled illegal immigration, put the issue on the ballot and won in a landslide.

“We do have to get better at talking to Oregonians about the circumstances — why people here are undocumented and why they have limited solutions to adjust their status,” Williams said. If the sanctuary issue gets on the ballot, she said, her coalition will have to do a lot more to reach out to Oregonians to talk about the lives of immigrants and the economic benefits she said they bring to the state.

Surveys taken in Oregon and in the country as a whole generally show strong support for immigration reform that would provide some sort of path to legal status for people in the country without citizenship. But the sanctuary issue is different.

That became clear in staunchly Democratic California this year. After Trump was elected, the state Senate’s leader, Los Angeles Democrat Kevin de Léon, introduced a statewide sanctuary bill. But instead of winning swift passage and serving as a rebuke to Trump, it languished for months.

It faced strong opposition from many California law enforcement officials and one independent poll in March showed voters strongly divided on the issue. A watered-down version didn’t pass until the final hours of the legislative session on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017.

It’s still a long time until Oregon’s anti-sanctuary initiative could go before voters in November 2018. But there’s been plenty of early maneuvering around the issue.

Kendoll’s group was the first to take advantage of a new petitioning rule from Secretary of State Dennis Richardson that allows them to collect signatures while waiting for the ballot title to be finalized. Several groups are challenging Richardson’s rule. If they’re successful, it could put a major crimp in the petition drive.

Perhaps more crucially, critics of the measure are accusing Oregonians for Immigration Reform of having ties to white nationalism. They say the group has accepted aid from groups and individuals concerned about the changing racial composition of the country.

Kendoll denied that her group is motivated by racial animus.

We’re going after people who are here illegally,” she said. “Their race, their ethnicity, their religion — anything — has nothing to do with it. It’s, ‘are you in our country legally?’”

That leads Kendoll to some hard-line views. She said the estimated 11 million people who entered the country illegally should leave, and she supports ending the program allowing those brought here as children to gain legal status. In addition, she backs legislation that would cut legal immigration by half over the next decade.

“When you allow such a large number of people to immigrate legally,” she said, “assimilation is more difficult because they tend to clump together and not assimilate.”

The sanctuary issue provides a hot-button path toward that goal.

At the Oregonians for Immigration Reform booth, volunteers displayed the mugshot of Sergio Martinez and called him their “poster boy.”

He’s the man accused of sexually assaulting a 65-year-old woman after being released from the Multnomah County Jail despite being frequently deported. Focusing on this one extreme example infuriates opponents.

“They play off peoples’ fears. That’s how they win,” said Causa’s Williams. She said this line of attack unfairly stereotypes people who enter the country illegally, especially since research shows they are actually less likely to commit crimes. 

If Oregon’s 30-year-old sanctuary law is repealed, the result would likely be a patchwork of local policies. Counties and cities would be able to decide on their own how or if they wanted to limit their involvement with federal immigration enforcement.

The initiative needs 88,184 signatures by next July to qualify for the ballot. Kendoll isn’t saying how many signatures they’ve collected so far.

Woodburn police chief aims to build trust after news of DACA repeal

The recent decision by the federal government to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals causes me to once again reflect on the relationship between our immigrant communities and local law enforcement.

As I am out and about in the greater Woodburn community, I hear of continued confusion, fear and mistrust of government among immigrant communities.

Critical to our mission as local police officers is the notion that people in our community, particularly our immigrant communities, trust us and not fear us. Trust cultivates an environment of cooperation with victims and witnesses of crime, cooperation that we desperately need to keep our community safe.

The ongoing controversies surrounding immigration issues in our country unfortunately plays counter to that mission, resulting in emotions encouraging fear — not trust — and stifling any such cooperation.

Oregon law, which we follow and enforce, guides us in our daily work of keeping our community safe. ORS 181A.820 helps reinforce the goal of mutual trust and respect between local law enforcement and immigrant communities.

This Oregon law specifically prohibits local law enforcement from engaging solely in administrative immigration matters.

The statute does, however, allow for local law enforcement involvement in immigration matters when circumstances of a crime are present, including a person subject to arrest pursuant to a warrant issued by a federal magistrate.

The decisions surrounding immigration policy and its future are mired in politics well beyond the reach of local law enforcement. What is within the reach of both local law enforcement and our immigrant communities are opportunities to continue fostering mutual trust and respect.

Now is the time for us to come together and work hard to overcome any fear and mistrust of local law enforcement.

We can do this together through building and maintaining positive relationships, being transparent, practicing the tenets of police legitimacy and procedural justice, and working in partnership to keep our community a safe place to live, work and visit.

Jim Ferraris is the chief of the Woodburn Police Department. To read the Oregon statues mentioned in this letter, go to www.oregonlaws.org
 

Oregon Expands Dangerous Sanctuary Law

While California is the most well-known sanctuary state, Oregon was actually the first one in the country. (The Daily Caller, Aug. 8, 2017) It passed its sanctuary law over 30 years ago. (Id.) Now that Governor Kate Brown has signed HB 3464, Oregon gets a new distinction, now being the most extreme sanctuary state. (Id.) Oregon’s new law makes it nearly impossible for state and local law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration officials and allows criminal aliens, even those convicted of the most serious crimes, to escape immigration enforcement. (H.B. 3464)

Specifically, the law prohibits state and local agencies in Oregon from sharing information about individuals including their contact information, time and location of their public appointments, the identity of relatives, and their place of employment. (Id.) The law also prohibits these institutions from requesting information about a person's immigration or citizenship status. (Id.) If they already have that information, they “may decline to disclose” the status to federal authorities unless required by law or court order, according to the new law. (Id.)

Outrageously, Governor Brown signed the sanctuary law a mere two weeks after criminal alien Sergio Jose Martinez was accused of raping a 65 year-old woman in her home and sexually assaulting another woman in a parking garage. (The Washington Times, Aug. 16, 2017) Martinez had previously been deported 20 times and had a long history of criminal activity, including burglary and battery, spanning several states. (The Oregonian, Aug. 3, 2017) In December 2016, Martinez was in a Multnomah County jail when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued a detainer on him. (Id.) Despite the detainer request, Multnomah County released him from jail without contacting ICE. (Id.) Multnomah County Sheriff Mike Reese said that he could not detain Martinez because of Oregon’s sanctuary law. (See KGW.com, Aug. 1, 2017) In June, Martinez was arrested again in Multnomah County. (Id.) He was released on July 17, after serving 31 days in jail. (Id.) One week later, Martinez was arrested for those violent sexual attacks on the two women. (Id.)


 

Walden votes against blocking funds to sanctuary cities

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., joined a small group of congressional Republicans who voted last week against blocking some federal funds from states and cities that don't cooperate with immigration enforcement agents.

Oregon is a so-called sanctuary state by law, and governments of several Oregon cities, including Portland's, have symbolically designated themselves as sanctuary cities. In practice, Oregon's immigration enforcement statute bars state and local law enforcement from cooperating with immigration agents if a detainee's only apparent offense is being in the country illegally.

Walden has generally voted in favor of conservative immigration policies. The congressman "leans toward less immigration, less population growth, less foreign labor," according to his voting scorecard at NumbersUSA, a group that lobbies for less immigration.

He voted to build a fence along the U.S.-Mexico border in 2006. He's co-sponsored legislation several times that would deny automatic citizenship to U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants.

Following the Trump administration's decision last week to end DACA, which grants deportation reprieves to children of illegal immigrants, Walden expressed sympathy for young adults who may face deportation. He said Congress should find a "permanent solution" to fix the nation's immigration system.

Walden was one of eight Republicans to vote against the funds-blocking amendment Wednesday, which was sponsored by U.S. Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo. It passed, 225-195.

In a speech from the House floor, Smith described his amendment as "very straightforward" and ensures that funds "only go to cities and states that uphold federal law."

All of Oregon's congressional Democrats -- Earl Blumenauer, Suzanne Bonamici, Peter DeFazio and Kurt Schrader -- voted against the amendment. Washington Republicans Jaime Herrera Beutler, Kathy McMorris Rodgers and Dan Newhouse voted for the amendment but Dave Reichert joined that state's Democrats in voting against it.

The bill containing the amendment funds the U.S. Department of the Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service, the Indian Health Service and other agencies. The full bill has yet to pass the House.

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