ICE

US car was targeted in Mexico ambush

MEXICO CITY (AP) — A senior U.S. official says there is strong circumstantial evidence that Mexican federal police who fired on a U.S. Embassy vehicle, wounding two CIA officers, were working for organized crime in a targeted assassination attempt.

Meanwhile, a Mexican official with knowledge of the case confirmed on Tuesday that prosecutors are investigating whether the Beltran Leyva Cartel was behind the Aug. 24 ambush.

The Mexican official said that is among several lines of investigation into the shooting of an armored SUV that was clearly marked with diplomatic license plates on a rural road near Cuernavaca south of Mexico City. Federal police, at times battered by allegations of infiltration and corruption by drug cartels, have said the shooting was a case of mistaken identity as officers were looking into the kidnapping of a government employee in that area.

"That's not a 'We're trying to shake down a couple people for a traffic violation sort of operation. That's a 'We are specifically trying to kill the people in this vehicle'," a U.S. official familiar with the investigation told The Associated Press. "This is not a 'Whoops, we got the wrong people.' "

Photos of the gray Toyota SUV, a model known to be used by Drug Enforcement Administration agents and other U.S. Embassy employees working in Mexico, showed it riddled with heavy gunfire. The U.S. Embassy called the attack an "ambush."

When asked by the AP if the Mexican federal police officers involved in the shooting were tied to organized crime, the U.S. official said, "The circumstantial evidence is pretty damn strong."

Both the U.S. and Mexican officials spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the diplomatic issue.

A federal police on Tuesday maintained the position that their agents fired on the vehicle by mistake, thinking it belonged to a band of kidnappers they were pursuing, according to a spokesman who was not authorized to speak on the record.

The U.S. State Department declined to discuss details.

"We will not comment on an ongoing investigation," said William Ostick, a spokesman. "This is a matter of great significance to both our countries and we will continue to cooperate with Mexican authorities in their investigation."

The Mexican official said one line of investigation is that members of the Beltran Leyva Cartel were interested in attacking the people in the car because some of their lookouts had seen them passing through the area and presumed they were investigating the cartel. It's possible they didn't know they were Americans.

The rural road near Cuernavaca where the attack took place is known territory of the remnants of the Beltran Leyvas, a once-powerful cartel now run by Hector Beltran Leyva since the Navy killed his brother, drug lord Arturo Beltran Leyva, in Cuernavaca in late 2009. Beltran Leyva was once aligned with Mexico's powerful cartel, Sinaloa, headed by fugitive drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. But the groups split in 2008 and continued government hits on Beltran Leyva leadership since then have splintered that cartel into small gangs warring for the area.

The CIA officers were heading down a dirt road to the military installation with a Mexican navy captain in the vehicle when a carload of gunmen opened fire and gave chase. The embassy SUV tried to escape, but three other cars joined the original vehicle in pursuing it down the road, according to the original navy statement. Occupants of all four vehicles fired.

"This is somebody with a powerful automatic weapon just unloading an entire clip, reloading, and continuing to fire at that same impact point, clearly with the intention of penetrating the armor and presumably killing those who are inside," the U.S. official told the AP.

Surveillance cameras in the area recorded two civilian vehicles chasing the U.S. Embassy SUV, the Mexican official said. So far Mexican officials have said only federal police fired on the SUV.

The two CIA officers received non-life-threatening wounds and have returned to the United States. The navy captain was uninjured and radioed the navy for help.

(Page 3 of 3)

Twelve officers have been detained in the case and are being held under a form of house arrest pending possible charges, and 51 officers have testified in the case. The FBI, which is leading the investigation for the U.S., has been in on interviews of the detainees. At FBI headquarters in Washington, spokesman Paul Bresson declined to comment.

A Mexican federal police spokesman said last month that the officers may not have noticed the diplomatic plates. The official said police focused on the unusual sight of a bulletproof sport utility vehicle traveling at high speed on a rural road, not on the car's distinctive diplomatic plates.

But Raul Benitez, a security expert at Mexico's National Autonomous University, said Mexican military sources have told him that "the attack was not an error," and "the objective was to annihilate the three passengers in the car."

"The same car with the same people had been going up and back (to the marine training camp) for a week, so perhaps some lookout who worked for drug traffickers informed the police, or the Beltrans" about the vehicle, Benitez said.

He said the federal police must have known that they were attacking a diplomatic vehicle.

"I don't think we're yet in a position to say definitively who did it, who paid them and why they did it," the U.S. official said. "We have been assured repeatedly in private and in public that the government of Mexico will investigate this to the end and provide a final answer as to what occurred, and I think our posture at this stage is we take them at their word."

Mexico's federal police agency, which President Felipe Calderon calls the most professional and highly trained of the country's law enforcement, has been hit with allegations of wrongdoing in recent months. In August, all 348 officers assigned to security details at the Mexico City International Airport were replaced in the wake of a June shooting of three federal policemen, who were killed by a fellow officer believed to be involved in trafficking drugs through the terminal.

Ten federal police officers were arrested in the northern border city of Ciudad Juarez in 2011, accused of running an extortion ring.

Attacks on diplomatic personnel in Mexico were once considered rare, but the CIA attack was the third shooting incident in two years.

In 2011, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent was killed and another wounded in a drug gang shooting in northern Mexico.

A drug-gang shooting in 2010 in the border city of Ciudad Juarez killed a U.S. consulate employee, her husband and another man.

That could be the result of the break-up of larger cartels, said Andrew Selee of the Washington-based Mexico Institute, noting that historically drug traffickers didn't want the attention that a hit on U.S. personnel normally brings.

"The lower level leaders in the cartels are making decisions the more seasoned leaders.
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OFIR President attends National Sheriff's Border School and Tour

El Paso, Texas hosted the Border School event that brought 60 Sheriff's from across the country to learn "What happens on the border, doesn't stay on the border".  Two sheriff's from Oregon attended.  OFIR salutes Morrow County Sheriff Kenneth Matlack and Multnomah County Under Sheriff Tim Morrow. 

Photos posted in the OFIR photo gallery. Read more about OFIR President attends National Sheriff's Border School and Tour

OFIR President to give Border Tour presentation in Eugene

Alert date: 
September 11, 2012
Alert body: 

If you missed the OFIR meeting in May, please join Lane912 and others, this Tuesday, September 11th at 6:00pm to watch this disturbing presentation showing what is really happening on our southern border.  OFIR President Cynthia Kendoll participated in a private, behind the scenes tour of the Arizona-Mexico Border, travelling and talking with experts in Law Enforcement, the environment and more.

Admission is free.  Your participation is welcome.  Eugene IZZY's Restaurant at 950 Seneca Rd. in Eugene.

OSP Traffic Stop Leads to Seizure of 2 lbs of Heroin, Arrests of 3 People in Douglas and Yamhill Counties

A traffic stop Saturday morning by Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers on Interstate 5 north of Canyonville led to the arrest of two men after the discovery of approximately 2 pounds of heroin concealed in their vehicle. Follow up investigation by OSP Drug Enforcement Section detectives and troopers also led to the arrest of a wanted person in Newberg.

On September 1, 2012 at approximately 7:09 a.m. an OSP trooper stopped a 2004 Chevrolet Impala displaying Washington license plates northbound on Interstate 5 near milepost 102 for a speed violation. The two occupants were identified as driver VICTOR HUGO BARRAGAN ALCAZAR, age 18, and passenger ARMANDO GIOVANI VALENCIA, age 18, both from Vancouver, Washington.

Subsequent investigation with the assistance of an OSP drug detection canine led to the discovery of approximately 2 pounds of heroin concealed in the car's trunk with an estimated value of $70,000.

Both men were taken into custody for Unlawful Possession and Distribution of Heroin. They were later cited and released to appear at a future date on the charges in Douglas County Circuit Court.

The investigation led OSP Drug Enforcement Section detectives and OSP troopers to Newberg. With the assistance of Newberg Police, OSP arrested ENRIQUE BOTELLO SANCHEZ, age 31, from Vancouver, Washington on September 2nd for an outstanding Fail to Appear Warrant (DUII, Resisting Arrest). Charges are pending for SANCHEZ related to the initial traffic stop and heroin seizure.

  Read more about OSP Traffic Stop Leads to Seizure of 2 lbs of Heroin, Arrests of 3 People in Douglas and Yamhill Counties

Oregon identified as a “sanctuary” for criminal aliens by USDOJ, the federal governments top law enforcement agency

A review of the 1,240 criminal aliens in the DOC prison population by numbers per crime and percentage (%) per crime equated to the following:

4-arsons (0.32%), 131-assaults (10.56%), 25-burglaries (2.02%), 29-driving offenses (2.34%), 171-drugs (13.79%), 4-forgeries (0.32%), 154-homicides (12.42%), 50-kidnappings (4.03%), 69-others (5.56%), 178-rapes (14.35%), 81-robberies (6.53%), 230-sex abuses (18.55%), 95-sodomies (7.66%), 12-thefts (0.97%), and 7-vehicle thefts (0.56%).
 

No member of the Oregon State Legislature should forget the uncounted crime victims and their families, no matter what their immigration status, all are victims of the 1,240 criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons.

Besides the devastating human cost, the financial cost is overwhelming, as well.  Read David Olen Cross's full report.
  Read more about Oregon identified as a “sanctuary” for criminal aliens by USDOJ, the federal governments top law enforcement agency

1,240 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in DOC prison system

According to the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) Inmate Population Profile dated August 1, 2012 DOC indicated there were 14,215 prisoners incarcerated in DOC’s 14 prisons (See attachment).

Not included in DOC’s August 1st Inmate Population Profile was DOC data indicating there were 1,240 foreign nationals (criminal aliens) incarcerated in its prison system (See attachment).

All 1,240 criminal aliens incarcerated on August 1st by DOC had United States (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), detainers. The U.S. DHS–ICE is responsible for identifying whether a DOC inmate is a criminal alien or a domestic inmate. If an inmate is identified as being a criminal alien, at U.S. DHS–ICE’s request, the DOC places an “ICE detainer” on the inmate that directs DOC officials to transfer custody to ICE following completion of the inmate’s state sanction.

Criminal aliens made up approximately 8.72% of the DOC August 1st prison population (See table).

 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC % Inmates W/ICE detainers

August 1, 2008

13,595

12,518

1,077

7.92%

August 1, 2009

13,903

12,687

1,216

8.75%

August 1, 2010

14,054

12,809

1,245

8.86%

August 1, 2011

14,027

12,810

1,217

8.68%

August 1, 2012

14,215

12,975

1,240

8.72%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 AUGUST 08rtf – 01 AUGUST 12.rtf and Inmate Population Profile 01 AUGUST 08 – 01 AUGUST 12.

Comparing DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers from August 1, 2008 (1,077 criminal aliens) and August 1, 2012 (1,240 criminal aliens), the DOC prison system incarcerated 163 criminal aliens more than it did on August 1, 2008, a 15.13% increase (See table).
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Inmates W/ICE detainers

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers # Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

DOC Inmates W/ICE detainers % Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

August 1, 2008

1,077

————

————

August 1, 2009

1,216

139

12.91%

August 1, 2010

1,245

29

2.38%

August 1, 2011

1,217

(28)

(2.25%)

August 1, 2012

1,240

23

1.89%

Total

163

15.13%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 AUGUST 08 – 01 AUGUST 12 and Inmate Population Profile 01 AUGUST 08 – 01 AUGUST 12.

When comparing DOC domestic criminal incarceration numbers from August 1, 2008 (12,518 domestic criminals) and August 1, 2012 (12,975 domestic criminals), the DOC prison system incarcerated 457 domestic criminals more than it did on August 1, 2008, a 3.65%% increase (See table).
 

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Month/Day/Year

DOC Total Domestic Inmates

DOC Domestic Inmates # Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

DOC Domestic Inmates % Increase or (Decrease) from Previous Year

August 1, 2008

12,518

————

————

August 1, 2009

12,687

169

1.35%

August 1, 2010

12,809

122

0.96%

August 1, 2011

12,810

1

0.01%

August 1, 2012

12,975

165

1.29%

Total

457

3.65%

Source: Research and Evaluation DOC Unit-ICE inmates lists 01 AUGUST 08 – 01 AUGUST 12 and Inmate Population Profile 01 AUGUST 08 – 01 AUGUST 12.

A review of the 1,240 criminal aliens in DOC prisons by number per county and percentage (%) per county equated to the following: 0-Baker (0.00%), 14-Benton (1.13%), 86-Clackamas (6.93%), 8-Clatsop (0.64%), 1-Columbia (0.08%), 9-Coos (0.72%), 3-Crook (0.24%), 1-Curry (0.08%), 17-Deschutes (1.37%), 5-Douglas (0.40%), 1-Gilliam (0.08%), 1-Grant (0.08%), 3-Harney (0.24%), 6-Hood River (0.48%), 47-Jackson (3.79%), 13-Jefferson (1.05%), 11-Josephine (0.89%), 10-Klamath (0.81%), 0-Lake (0.00), 68-Lane (5.48%), 8-Lincoln (0.64%), 28-Linn (2.26%), 10-Malheur (0.81%), 279-Marion (22.50%), 7-Morrow (0.56%), 280-Multnomah (22.58%), 1-OOS (0.08%), 19-Polk (1.53%), 0-Sherman (0.00%), 3-Tillamook (0.24%), 23-Umatilla (1.85%), 2-Union (0.16), 0-Wallowa (0.00%), 4-Wasco (0.32%), 238-Washington (19.19%), 0-Wheeler (0.00%), and 34-Yamhill (2.74%).

No member of the Oregon State Legislature should forget the uncounted crime victims and their families, no matter what their immigration status, all victims of the 1,240 criminal aliens incarcerated in DOC prisons.

A review of the 1,240 criminal aliens in the DOC prison population by numbers per crime and percentage (%) per crime equated to the following: 4-arsons (0.32%), 131-assaults (10.56%), 25-burglaries (2.02%), 29-driving offenses (2.34%), 171-drugs (13.79%), 4-forgeries (0.32%), 154-homicides (12.42%), 50-kidnappings (4.03%), 69-others (5.56%), 178-rapes (14.35%), 81-robberies (6.53%), 230-sex abuses (18.55%), 95-sodomies (7.66%), 12-thefts (0.97%), and 7-vehicle thefts (0.56%).

Oregon State Legislators should not overlook the source of the preceding crimes, the country of origin of the 1,240 criminal aliens in DOC prisons.

The self-declared counties of origin of the 1,240 criminal aliens in the DOC prison population by numbers and percentage (%) per country equated to the following: 9-Canada (0.72%), 12-Cuba (0.97%), 17-El Salvador (1.37%), 32-Guatemala (2.58%), 12-Honduras (0.97%), 7-Laos (0.56%), 1,017-Mexico (82.02%), 89-others (7.18%), 6-Philippines (0.48% ), 8-Russia (0.64%), 13-Ukraine (1.05%), and 18-Vietnam (1.45%).

Beyond the DOC criminal alien incarceration numbers and incarceration percentages, per county and per crime type, or even country of origin, criminal aliens pose high economic cost on Oregonians.

An individual prisoner in the DOC prison system costs approximately ($82.48) per day to incarcerate (See link).

http://www.oregon.gov/DOC/PUBAFF/docs/pdf/IB_53_quick_facts.pdf

The DOC’s incarceration cost for its 1,240 criminal alien prison population is approximately ($102,275.20) per day, ($715,926.40) per week, and ($37,330,448.00) per year.

Even taking into account fiscal year 2011 United States Federal Government State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) award of $2,669,738.00 if the State of Oregon receives the same amount of SCAAP funding for fiscal year 2012, the cost to incarcerate 1,240 criminal aliens to the DOC will be at least ($34,660,710.00) (See link).

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/grant/11SCAAPAwards.pdf

None of my preceding cost estimates for the DOC to incarcerate the 1,240 criminal aliens include the dollar amount for legal services (indigent defense), court costs, nor cost estimates to cover victim assistance.


An unfortunate fact, the State of Oregon is not fully cooperating with the U.S. DHS–ICE to fight crime committed by criminal aliens who reside in Oregon.

In year 2007, a United States Department of Justice (USDOJ) report titled “Cooperation of SCAAP (State Criminal Alien Assistance Program) Recipients in the Removal of Criminal Aliens from the United States, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Inspector General Audit Division, Audit Report 07-07, August 2007, Redacted-Public Version” identified the State of Oregon as having an official “state sanctuary statute,” ORS 181.850 Enforcement of federal immigration laws (See link).

http://www.usdoj.gov/oig/reports/OJP/a0707/final.pdf

The USDOJ, the federal governments top law enforcement agency, identified Oregon as a “sanctuary” for criminal aliens.

An Oregon law, Oregon Revised Statue 181.850 (ORS 181.850), Section (1), prohibits Oregon law enforcement (Oregon State Police (OSP), county sheriffs, city police departments) from asking immigration status of anyone residing in the State of Oregon “for the purpose of detecting or apprehending persons whose only violation of law is that they are persons of foreign citizenship present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws.” Under ORS 181.850, Section (2), Oregon law enforcement may exchange information with U.S. DHS–ICE . . . “in order to: Subsection (a), “Verify the immigration status of a person if the person is arrested for any criminal offense;” or, Subsection (b), “Request criminal investigation information with reference to persons named in records of the” U.S. DHS–ICE . . . (See link).

http://www.leg.state.or.us/ors/181.html

The State of Oregon should no longer be classified by U.S. federal government law enforcement as having an official “state sanctuary statute” for criminal aliens, nor should Oregon be a sanctuary for criminal aliens to kill, rape, or maim Oregonians.

I ask the Oregon Legislature to please introduce, support, and pass legislation to fight foreign national crime in the next Oregon State Legislature legislative session.
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Federal agents file a lawsuit to stop "deferred action"

Alert date: 
August 23, 2012
Alert body: 

Federal immigration agents just now filed a suit against Janet Napolitano's DREAM amnesty.  Read the full story here.

Federal immigration agents just now filed a suit against Janet Napolitano's DREAM amnesty

All summer, citizens have been crying out, 'Why doesn't somebody take this to court!' over Janet Napolitano's Dream amnesty directive.

THIS MORNING, ICE AGENTS DID . . . with the promise of help from NumbersUSA members!

In the last hour, a group of 10 federal immigration-enforcement agents -- including the president of the agents' union -- filed suit against Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano and ICE Director John Morton.

The suit seeks an injunction against Napolitano's June 15 directive that includes issuing work permits to a whole class of illegal aliens, estimated at 1.7 million, under the age of 31. The 10 agents of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) section of DHS contend that the directive for the amnesty that DHS began to hand out on Aug. 15 is "unlawful and unconstitutional."

Kris Kobach, the nation's best-known immigration litigator, is leading the agents' legal team.

Chris Crane, president of the ICE Agents' Union, AGFE Council #119, is the public spokesman for the plaintiffs.

NumbersUSA, the nation's largest pro-enforcement grassroots organization, is underwriting the suit, based on the expectation of raising the necessary funds from our 1.3 million on-line activists. Read more about Federal immigration agents just now filed a suit against Janet Napolitano's DREAM amnesty

Metolius man faces charges

A Metolius man was arrested after police allegedly found him to be in possession of one ounce of methamphetamine, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said.

Juan Miranda-Medina, 32, was arrested in the parking lot of Erickson’s Thriftway in Madras on July 27 on suspicion of possession and delivery of meth. Miranda-Medina was taken to the Jefferson County jail, where he is also being held by Immigration and Customs Enforcement for illegal re-entry into the United States.

  Read more about Metolius man faces charges

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'Icebreaker 2' suspect sentenced

The 13th defendant in the sprawling “Icebreaker 2” investigation was sentenced Wednesday morning in Linn County Circuit Court.

Gilberto Garcia-Camacho [also known as Marco Hernandez-Vargas], 25, of Linn County pleaded guilty to racketeering and faces nearly three years in prison, with credit for time served and the possibility of earning time off for good behavior.

Authorities have said that in Icebreaker 2, a drug trafficking network distributed as much as 4 pounds of methamphetamine and 2 pounds of heroin throughout the Willamette Valley in any given week.

Police raids happened in the case on March 13 after a nine-month investigation.

Garcia-Camacho [aka Hernandez-Vargas] came in at the tail end of the criminal enterprise, and purchased large quantities of drugs, said defense attorney Paul Ferder of Salem.

Ferder added that Garcia-Camacho [aka Hernandez-Vargas] knew very few people involved in the larger criminal organization.

“He’s aware that at the conclusion of his sentence, he will be deported,” Ferder said.

Garcia-Camacho [aka Hernandez-Vargas], a Mexican citizen, was polite but declined much comment at Wednesday’s hearing.

“Whatever you decide,” he told Judge Daniel Murphy through a Spanish interpreter.

According to the charge, Garcia-Camacho [aka Hernandez-Vargas] conspired and endeavored to associate with an enterprise that distributed methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin.

Daniel Wendel, assistant attorney general, represented the prosecution. The case is being handled by the Oregon Department of Justice and the Benton County District Attorney’s Office. Most of the suspects were from Benton County.

Christian Stringer, Benton County chief deputy district attorney, said eight people in Benton County and four in Marion County already had been sentenced in the investigation.

Six court cases remain in Benton County, and five of those suspects remain in custody. A sixth, James Knox, was released after posting $100,000 on $1 million bail.

The investigation is continuing, and more people could be arrested, Stringer said.

  Read more about 'Icebreaker 2' suspect sentenced

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