environment

Just a smiley face painted on self-serving policy

What will happen to us, to our country and to our grandchildren if this massive mess of an amnesty bill prevails?

In their self-serving, big money, wheeling and dealing shenanigans, many of our elected officials can't see (or more likely, don't care) what they are doing to our country and our future.

Read Max Powell's insightful article about the consequences of such short sighted thinking.
 

Call now - as if the future of our country depends upon it

Alert date: 
June 24, 2013
Alert body: 

Please continue to call Congress and urge Senators to VOTE NO on S. 744, a monstrous disaster in the making.

The Senate just voted 67-27 to limit debate and amendments on the Corker-Hoeven amendment to the S. 744 amnesty bill.

That means the 1,100+ page bill as amended by 119 pages of amendments today can come to a vote as early as Wednesday morning. The final cloture vote (requiring 60 votes) on the whole bill could be as early as Thursday morning.

We recommend that you sign up with NumbersUSA for free faxing to Congress and to receive alerts on immigration bills before Congress. http://www.numbersusa.com.

NumbersUSA and FAIR are both doing great work in leading the opposition to bad immigration bills in Congress.

Congressional switch-board numbers: (202) 224-3132 or Toll free (866) 220-0044

Call, call, call....as if the future of our country depends upon it...because it does!

Smoke jumpers plant landing in pot 'starter kits'

A team of smoke jumpers fighting fires in the Applegate unknowingly dropped into a 1,500-plant marijuana garden this week, sheriff's officials said.

The locally-based smoke jumpers parachuted into the garden as they were searching for lightning-sparked fires, Jackson County sheriff's spokeswoman Andrea Carlson said.

The firefighters contacted law enforcement, who pulled the plants from the site on Tuesday, Carlson said.

"They had no idea they were dropping into a marijuana garden," Carlson said.

The sheriff's department said it is unusual to find a large marijuana garden this early in the year.

People usually stumble into the gardens in the late summer or early fall.

Most of the plants were small and growing inside plastic pots.

"They were in starter kits, so to speak," Carlson said.

The grow site was littered with hills of garbage, much of it harmful chemicals that can pollute soil and streams in the area, officials said.

At least two people were believed to be camping at the garden, keeping armed watch over the plants as they grew over the summer, Carlson said.

"These plants were going to be harvested in late summer or early fall," Carlson said.

The amount of garbage was disturbing, though not surprising considering what deputies have seen piled up at previous gardens found in the forest, she said.

"If you consider at least two people were eating two meals a day and then throwing the food containers away, and that it takes a lot of chemicals and fertilizers to start these grows, that's a lot of trash," Carlson said. "It's very bad for the environment of our forests."

The sheriff's department is putting together a group of volunteers who will hike into the garden to haul out the trash in the coming weeks, Carlson said.

"We won't just let it sit out there," Carlson said.

There were 1,509 plants at the site, along with hundreds of additional holes dug for future planting. Authorities also found two long guns and other evidence that suggested the garden was part of a Mexican cartel operation, Carlson said. She declined to elaborate, citing the ongoing investigation.

Those recreating on federal lands should be aware of the dangers of coming across possible grow sites, officials say. Telltale signs are PVC piping or black poly-pipe, bags of fertilizer, large quantities of trash and camp sites. Those who come across such sites should leave immediately the way they came in, police say. If possible, take note of the location on a GPS and make a waypoint but do not linger or investigate further. Upon returning home, call the local sheriff's department and provide accurate road descriptions and drainage or creek names.

"Anything that doesn't add up to the way the woods should look should give you a clue that you're in a marijuana grow," Carlson said. "Just head back the way you came and immediately call law enforcement."

Most of the marijuana plants at the grow site were small and inside plastic pots, said sheriff’s officials.

Scholarship opportunity for interested students

Alert date: 
January 14, 2013
Alert body: 

OFIR is accepting applications for our second annual essay contest scholarship opportunity.  Find out more.
 

Destination Washington D.C.

OFIR's President will travel to Washington D.C. to attend two conferences.  There will be numerous opportunities to meet and network with people from all over the country interested in stopping illegal immigration.  A summary of conference events will be posted on the website upon her return.

Mark your calendar for Saturday, May 12

OFIR members and concerned citizens, you're invited to bring a friend and join us Saturday, May 12 at 2:00 pm for a behind the scenes look at the Arizona - Mexico border.  OFIR President, Cynthia Kendoll traveled with the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) and a small group of concerned citizens from around the country on a week long, intensive study of the situation on our southern border in restricted areas not safely accessible to citizens.  Cynthia will be presenting a photographic tour of what she witnessed on the trip.  Move past the propaganda and see what is really happening.  During the trip, specialists in several governmental departments shared how they are impacted every day by illegal immigration.  Mark your calendar and plan to attend.  

Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 2 pm

In Salem, at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn,

3125 Ryan Dr SE, just west of I-5 Exit 253, across from Costco.

 

Is the Border Secure? Shocking Video Shows Otherwise

Just about a week ago, we were given a video exposing a major breach on the U.S./Mexico border near Lukeville, Arizona, located about 100 miles southwest of Tucson.  We checked its authenticity with our sources at the Department of Homeland Security who have confirmed that the video is real and was taken recently.  This was first posted by Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever and see how, despite claims by the Administration, the border is far from secure.

border video

Our DHS sources have been able to determine from the clothes the men are wearing, the straps on their backpacks, and other things they're carrying, that these are indeed drug smugglers bringing hundreds of pounds of illegal drugs into the United States.

The fence shown here was built by the Bush Administration and part of a $1 billion contract with Boeing. Amazingly, the fence was designed to do exactly what the smugglers did. The fence panels slide inside two steel columns, but no one in the Bush Administration nor at Boeing even considered welding the panels to the posts, making it easy for smugglers to get through. What we don't know is if they failed to weld along the entire length of the fence or just in some areas.

DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano has testified before Congress, saying the border is more secure now than it's ever been. Administration officials boast about fewer border crossings and the effectiveness of thousands of more border patrol agents. But where are the border patrol agents in this video? And if there aren't any border patrol agents to see the illegal crossings, then the crossings can't be recorded.

NumbersUSA is currently pushing for a Congressional investigation into this major breach of border security. The fence needs to be fixed, and Boeing needs to pay for it!

We need all Americans to watch it and consider its ramifications. Whether it be smuggling of illegal drugs, national security, or illegal immigration, every American should be shocked and demand answers!

Video link at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qdc-kv7nzaU

ICE Names "Public Advocate" – Call Him!

Today ICE announced the creation of a new office to serve as a point of contact for those who have "concerns, questions, recommendations or important issues they would like to raise." Boy, do we!

The office will be led by Andrew Lorenzen-Strait, who has been at ICE since 2008, mainly working as an advisor on reforming detention practices. Prior to joining ICE, Strait was a legal services attorney in Prince George's County, Md.

Strait sees his job as helping to flack the administration's non-enforcement policies, which he calls "sensible priorities". He says he will "strive to expand and enhance our dialogue with the stakeholder community." Except to Strait, the only stakeholders worthy of attention are illegal aliens and their advocates.

But I think we should take his statement at face value. He says one of his main duties is to "assist individuals and community stakeholders in addressing complaints and concerns in accordance with agency policies and operations, particularly concerns related to ICE enforcement actions that affect U.S. citizens".

Since ICE has not seen fit to establish a victim's advocacy unit to address the concerns of victims and families, instead establishing a hotline for illegal aliens in detention, I hope all you citizens out there who have been affected by illegal immigration – especially those who have been the victims of crimes committed by illegal aliens – will not hesitate to get in touch with Mr. Strait, and let him and his staff hear your concerns. In his blog, he said he is "thrilled" to be in this role, and hopes you'll reach out to him. He can be reached at andrew.strait@dhs.gov or (202) 732-3999.

 

 

 

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